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scott sanderson
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Soul to Sole: One who walks, and sees, and reflects and writes
Soul to Sole: One who walks, and sees, and reflects and writes

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Dog and I
Dog and I
soletosoulinflorida.wordpress.com
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What rare gift it is
When God grants a “longer wait” to some
As here on earth there are things to do
There are people to greet
Stories to tell
Smiles to share

A life long-lived is a blessing
For those all around
Wisdom and grace
Humor and patience
Are gifts they still share

Remaining blessed
Are those who are given a “longer wait”
Through dark times they endured
Keeping the faith, marching on
Now, sadness reigns no more
Vanquished by the love of live
That re-lights each new day.

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                      The problem is Offense
Recent world events have had tragic consequences. Islamic extremists have within the past few months massacred schoolchildren in Peshawar Pakistan and murdered the staff of a satirical newspaper in Paris France. In North Korea the leaders of that isolated nation, threatened death to US movie-goers, in retaliation for a film that had been produced in which the tyrannical leader of that nation was to be killed.  Even in America, two police officers were shot while sitting in their patrol car by a person apparently upset about perceived police culpability in the death of an unarmed man.
Though these events have occurred in different parts of the world, and with different results, there seems to have been a common theme. Each of these acts, whether done in the guise of religion or not, involved one group being offended. This common thread seems absent from most debates. The Islamic extremists have often stated that they are offended by the cavalier and capricious manner in which their prophet Mohammed has been portrayed. They considered this an affront.  The leaders of North Korea apparently felt the same way towards their ruler.  Even the problems that some—mostly African Americans-- have had with the police in New York  City and elsewhere, arise from a feeling of being offended by what they have  perceived as racist attitudes.
 So, what does it mean to “be offended”? Is it a “right”?
Often when the topic of offense seems to be discussed, the onus is placed upon the party that has offended.  In today’s political climate, it is widely viewed as appropriate for the party that has caused the transgression to confess, ask forgiveness and make amends. The latter often involves money. The presidents of both the United States and Australia have, within the past few years, apologized for maltreatment of natives, even though the offenses occurred generations ago.
I want to explore the other side of the topic. Instead of arguing that people should try to conduct themselves in a way that will keep them from offending someone, or some group, we should instead understand that everyone will be offended by something. The issue then becomes, how do we deal with the offense? Specifically, I ask, how in this crowded world, do we find peace, when we have been offended?
Offense, in this regard has geography. It can be mapped and charted. It occurs somewhere in place and time. Consider the case with involving the New York City police. For the majority of Americans who do not live in that city, the accusations of racism and malpractice seem odd—even though similar events have occurred in other parts of the nation. A person living in a small town in Iowa, will likely few the actions in a different light, even if they are African American.
The remedy for those who were offended was to leave the area. We were taught this at a young age. If someone is bullying you, or doing something that is offensive, like making fun of your belief system, then we were not to “hang” around with those people. This seemed to work well. Even if we did not obtain an apology, or any indication that the activity will cease, we could at least remove ourselves from the situation, and regain peace.
However, due to computers the world has changed. Time and space have collapsed. On a computer we can experience something that happened yesterday or ten years ago. Likewise we can also   experience something that is happening across the nation or even across the world—in real time. This is a new reality; a breaking-down of barriers that once kept us removed from knowing about the largesse of the world.
No longer are we able to escape to some faraway place where we can be free from offense. This I feel is a pernicious problem that will become indicative of this “post modern” era. Solutions must therefore be found within the individual, for now offense has become ubiquitous, in that it is no longer bound by time and space constraints.
 
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Closure
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closure ( philosophy) It is that time again: The end of a school year, the end of a
business cycle, or the end of the day. Everything, at some point ends. But the world has changed. It has become more complex, and with
that complexity our concept of t...
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**
Window Watcher A poem From the window I see her Looking sad, big eyes focused ahead, Hoping that someone would come, soon   She hears something and sits up
straight Could it be them? Restlessness sets in, when will the
door open?   Anticipation builds! Soon...
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Why We Need Answers
Why We Need Answers
newyorker.com
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