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Appleby Associates Executive Career Coaching
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Appleby Associates – Executive Career Coaching | Support – Helping you find and secure positions that are right for you.
Appleby Associates – Executive Career Coaching | Support – Helping you find and secure positions that are right for you.

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Focus - Clarify your options; define your goals.
Draw out the truth to get a clearer picture of who you are and what you can and should be aiming to do. What motivates and excites you, what do you believe and want and what do you really have to offer? http://ow.ly/CDvQ30a3rqU

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THREE STEPS TO EXECUTING AN EFFECTIVE CAREER SEARCH CAMPAIGN

Launching a job search without clear focus and thorough preparation will invariably lead to a less than optimal result, so before you start, double check that you have a succinct response to the question “What are you looking for?”... http://ow.ly/4GZV309ZBzq

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Often the most valuable assessment of your skills, strengths and weaknesses is through people that you know or work with. They can be a valuable source of information in helping you remember things you’ve achieved and areas you excel in. Feedback from others can reveal the true impact you make on people. Ask past or present managers or supervisors; colleagues; customers or suppliers; family and friends; members of your clubs or societies. It’s important to keep a record of the skills you have and constantly review them as your skill level and requirements will change as you progress through your career. http://bit.ly/2lApw2c
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INTERVIEW. While it's important to research the organisation you're applying to, knowing a little about the person/persons you'll be facing can prove extremely useful. Their personal bio on the website should provide background information as well as evidence of their work or links to articles they've written. Check out LinkedIn to see the kind of groups they're members of and the people/organisations they're following. Have they posted recently, or linked to any industry articles? These extra details can offer an insight into their interviewing style, the character traits they deem important and the kind of questions they might ask. http://ow.ly/JfsQ309IQcF
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ARE YOU AN EMOTIONALLY INTELLIGENT BOSS? Research is increasingly showing emotional intelligence to be an integral part of good leadership but whilst it might have a nice ring to it what does it actually mean? In a leadership context, it means being secure enough in your own abilities to put your own career to one side to tune into the people you are managing, their work performance, feelings, interests and problems. http://bit.ly/2l0RnZz
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Just being asked to an interview means you're a strong contender for the job and by following up you're reminding the interviewer of that fact. Before you walk out of the interview room emphasise how much you want the job and ask when the interviewer is planning to contact candidates, so if you haven't heard anything by then you can legitimately send a quick, friendly note indicating your eagerness to hear. As soon as possible send a thank you note highlighting the value you'll bring to the company and your enthusiasm for the role. Keep learning and thinking about the company and be prepared for additional interviews. http://bit.ly/2kDRJkB

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V FORMAT - There are two basic forms of CV: historical and skills-oriented. The advantage of the historical CV is that it is familiar to the reader and progress through your career can be tracked fairly easily. The disadvantage is that the reader has to work out for themselves the contribution you're able to make to their organisation. The skills-oriented CV can address this problem by stating clearly the capabilities you have and providing evidence to back them up, in the form of career-wide key achievements. Therefore not only are your abilities readily apparent to the reader, but relevant achievements from past roles can be emphasised http://bit.ly/1BwpCdJ

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CV FORMAT - There are two basic forms of CV: historical and skills-oriented. The advantage of the historical CV is that it is familiar to the reader and progress through your career can be tracked fairly easily. The disadvantage is that the reader has to work out for themselves the contribution you're able to make to their organisation. The skills-oriented CV can address this problem by stating clearly the capabilities you have and providing evidence to back them up, in the form of career-wide key achievements. Therefore not only are your abilities readily apparent to the reader, but relevant achievements from past roles can be emphasised http://bit.ly/1BwpCdJ

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As you move through your career it’s imperative that you make time to take a step back and reflect on your experiences. Reflection is an important tool in developing self-awareness and an understanding of your skill set. Humans have a natural tendency to recall their failures in great detail and to overlook achievements along the way. Celebrating your successes in a constructive way is great for self-esteem and developing the confidence to tackle new challenges. Take the time to absorb and reflect on different experiences, approaches and attitudes as you come into contact with them and you may begin to see life through a different lens. http://bit.ly/1YJuoNy
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Beware the preliminary phone interview. While often disguised as a ”quick chat” or little more than a formality en route to the real thing, it's really not to be underestimated. The most important thing is not to lose sight of your core objective – to clinch that all-important face-to-face interview. A quick chat it may be, but the person on the other line needs a reason to take you to the next phase. It's up to you to provide this. http://bit.ly/2kDRJkB
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