Profile

Cover photo
Ron Hays
Works at UCLA
Attended UC Riverside
Lives in Cerritos
17 followers|12,255 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideosReviews

Stream

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
http://medpac.gov/…/june-2015-report-to-the-congress-medica…
“If a link between patient-reported outcomes and clinical outcomes could be established and if the statistical and administrative concerns that the Commission raised in the context of the HOS could be mitigated, then a tool like the 10-item PROMIS Global Health Scale may have value as a population-based outcome measure to compare performance across FFS Medicare, accountable care organizations, and MA plans. Further research is needed before reaching conclusions about the use of HRQOL measures in Medicare” (p. 215)

Hays, R. D., Bjorner, J., Revicki, D. A., Spritzer, K., & Cella, D. (2009). Development of physical and mental health summary scores from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) global items. Quality of Life Research, 18, 873-80.
1
Add a comment...

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
Hays, R. D., Liu, H., & Kapteyn, A.  (in press).  Use of internet panels to conduct surveys.  Behavior Research Methods.

Abstract: Use of internet panels to collect survey data is increasing because it is cost-effective, enables access to large and diverse samples quickly, takes less time than traditional methods to get data back for analysis, and the standardization of data collection process makes studies easy to replicate.  A variety of probability-based panels have been created including Telepanel/CentERpanel, Knowledge Networks (now GFK KnowledgePanel®), the American Life Panel, the LISS Panel, and the Understanding American Study panel.  Despite the advantage of having a known denominator (sampling frame), the probability-based internet panels often have low recruitment participation rates and some have argued that there is little practical difference between opting out of a probability sample and opting into a non-probability (convenience) internet panel.  This paper provides an overview of both probability-based and convenience panels, discussing potential benefits and cautions for each method, and summarizing approaches used to weight panel respondents to better represent the underlying population.  Challenges in using internet panel data such as false answers, answering too fast, giving the same answer repeatedly, getting multiple surveys from the same respondent, and panelists being members of multiple panels are discussed.  There is more to be learned about internet panels generally and web-based data collection along with opportunities to evaluate data collected using mobile devices and social media platforms. 
1
Add a comment...

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
Chawla, N., Urato, M., Ambs, A., Schussler, N., Hays, R. D., Clauser, S. B., Zaslavsky, A. M., Schwartz, M., Halpern, M., Gaillot, S., Goldstein, E. H., & Arora, N. K.  (in press).  Unveiling SEER-CAHPS®: A new data resource for quality of care research.  Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Background: Since 1990, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have collaborated to create linked data resources to improve our understanding of patterns of care, health care costs, and trends in utilization. However, existing data linkages have not includes measures of patient experiences with care.

Objective: To describe a new resource for quality of care research based on a linkage between the Medicare Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) patient surveys and the NCI’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data.

Design: This is an observational study of CAHPS respondents and includes both fee-for-service and Medicare Advantage beneficiaries with and without cancer. The data linkage includes: CAHPS survey data collected between 1998-2010 to assess patient reports on multiple aspects of their care, such as access to needed and timely care, doctor communication, as well as patients’ global ratings of their personal doctor, specialists, overall health care, and their health plan; SEER registry data (1973-2007) on cancer site, stage, treatment, death information, and patient demographics; and longitudinal Medicare claims data (2002-2011) for fee-for-service beneficiaries on utilization and costs of care.

Participants:  In total, 150,750 respondents were in the cancer cohort and 571,318 were in the non-cancer cohort. 

Main Measures: The data linkage includes SEER data on cancer site, stage, treatment, death information, and patient demographics in addition to longitudinal data from Medicare claims and information on patient experiences from CAHPS surveys.  

Key Results: Sizable proportions of cases from common cancers (e.g. breast, colorectal, prostate) and short-term survival cancers (e.g. pancreas) by time since diagnosis enable comparisons across the cancer care trajectory by MA vs. FFS coverage.

Conclusions: SEER-CAHPS is a valuable resource for information about Medicare beneficiaries’ experiences of care across different diagnoses and treatment modalities, and enables comparisons by type of insurance.
1
Add a comment...

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
J Gen Intern Med. 2014 Nov 22. [Epub ahead of print]

Should Health Care Providers be Accountable for Patients' Care Experiences?
Anhang Price R1, Elliott MN, Cleary PD, Zaslavsky AM, Hays RD.

Abstract
Measures of patients' care experiences are increasingly used as quality measures in accountability initiatives. As the prominence and financial impact of patient experience measures have increased, so too have concerns about the relevance and fairness of including them as indicators of health care quality. Using evidence from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) surveys, the most widely used patient experience measures in the United States, we address seven common critiques of patient experience measures: (1) consumers do not have the expertise needed to evaluate care quality; (2) patient "satisfaction" is subjective and thus not valid or actionable; (3) increasing emphasis on improving patient experiences encourages health care providers and plans to fulfill patient desires, leading to care that is inappropriate, ineffective, and/or inefficient; (4) there is a trade-off between providing good patient experiences and providing high-quality clinical care; (5) patient scores cannot be fairly compared across health care providers or plans due to factors beyond providers' control; (6) response rates to patient experience surveys are low, or responses reflect only patients with extreme experiences; and (7) there are faster, cheaper, and more customized ways to survey patients than the standardized approaches mandated by federal accountability initiatives.
1
Add a comment...

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
Qual Life Res. 2014 Oct 12. [Epub ahead of print]
Correlation of PROMIS scales and clinical measures among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with and without exacerbations.
Irwin DE1, Atwood CA Jr, Hays RD, Spritzer K, Liu H, Donohue JF, Leidy NK, Yount SE, DeWalt DA.

Abstract
PURPOSE:
The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) initiative was developed to advance the methodology of PROs applicable to chronic diseases. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive chronic disease associated with poor health. This study was designed to examine the correlation of PROMIS health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scales and clinical measures among COPD patients.
METHODS:
A cross-sectional analysis was conducted comparing patients who were stable (n = 100) with those currently experiencing a COPD exacerbation (n = 85). All PROMIS measures for adults available at the time of the study (2008), disease-targeted and other HRQOL instruments, health literacy, percent predicted FEV1, and a 6-min walk distance were assessed when patients were considered clinically stable.
RESULTS:
Stable COPD patients reported significantly (p ≤ 0.05) better health-related quality of life on PROMIS domains than patients experiencing an exacerbation. PROMIS domain scores were significantly (p ≤ 0.01) correlated with each of legacy measures. Six-min walk scores were most highly correlated with the PROMIS physical function domain scores (r = 0.53) followed by the fatigue (r = -0.26), social (r = 0.24) and to a lesser extent depression (r = -0.23), and anxiety (r = -0.22) domain scores. Percent predicted FEV1 score was significantly associated with PROMIS physical function scores (r = 0.27).
CONCLUSION:
This study provides support for the validity of the PROMIS measures in COPD patients.

 
 
1
Add a comment...

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
Spiegel BM, Hays RD, Bolus R, Melmed GY, Chang L5, Whitman C, Khanna PP, Paz SH, Hays T, Reise S, Khanna D
Am J Gastroenterol. 2014 Sep 9. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2014.237. [Epub ahead of print]
Development of the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Gastrointestinal Symptom Scales.
 
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) is a standardized set of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) that cover physical, mental, and social health. The aim of this study was to develop the NIH PROMIS gastrointestinal (GI) symptom measures.METHODS:We first conducted a systematic literature review to develop a broad conceptual model of GI symptoms. We complemented the review with 12 focus groups including 102 GI patients. We developed PROMIS items based on the literature and input from the focus groups followed by cognitive debriefing in 28 patients. We administered the items to diverse GI patients (irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and other common GI disorders) and a census-based US general population (GP) control sample. We created scales based on confirmatory factor analyses and item response theory modeling, and evaluated the scales for reliability and validity.RESULTS:A total of 102 items were developed and administered to 865 patients with GI conditions and 1,177 GP participants. Factor analyses provided support for eight scales: gastroesophageal reflux (13 items), disrupted swallowing (7 items), diarrhea (5 items), bowel incontinence/soilage (4 items), nausea and vomiting (4 items), constipation (9 items), belly pain (6 items), and gas/bloat/flatulence (12 items). The scales correlated significantly with both generic and disease-targeted legacy instruments, and demonstrate evidence of reliability.CONCLUSIONS:Using the NIH PROMIS framework, we developed eight GI symptom scales that can now be used for clinical care and research across the full range of GI disorders.Am J Gastroenterol advance online publication, 2014; doi:10.1038/ajg.2014.237.
1
Add a comment...

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
Fongwa, M. N., Nandy, K., Yang, Q., & Hays, R. D.  (in press).  The Facilitators of and barriers to Adherence to hypertension Treatment Scale (FATS). Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.

Background: Lack of adherence to recommended regimens is a major cause of uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) among African/Black American (AA) women. The national initiative to increase BP control among AAs by 50% makes clear the need for culturally appropriate instruments to assess facilitators of adherence to treatment of hypertension (HBP). Objective: To develop a culturally sensitive measure of facilitators of and barriers to adherence to hypertension treatment regimens for AA women. Methods: We developed the Facilitators of and barriers to Adherence to hypertension Treatment Scale (FATS) with input from focus groups with 20 AA women. A total of 147 AA women from a federally-funded inner city clinic in Los Angeles were enrolled in the study and 70 (48%) completed the survey. Internal consistency reliability was estimated using Cronbach’s alpha. Results: Coefficient alpha for the 18-item FATS was 0.79. In a multivariate regression model, the FATS was significantly associated with: Hill-Bone High Blood Pressure Compliance Scale (standardized β = 0.40; p = 0.0017), Enhancing Recovery from Coronary Heart Disease Social Support Inventory (ESSI) (β = 0.32; p = 0.0112), and CAGE alcohol screening instrument (β = - 0.29; p = 0.0273). FATS was significantly associated with ESSI and CAGE even after controlling for BP stage (e.g., Stage I, >140 -159 systolic or >90 – 99 diastolic pressure). Discussion: FATS is a culturally sensitive measure for assessing adherence to treatment regimens of HBP in AA women. Further study in other samples of AA women is needed to confirm the FATS adequately assesses facilitators of adherence to regimens for HBP in AA women.
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
17 people
Tom Potts's profile photo
Richard Kravitz's profile photo
Mohir Ahmedov's profile photo
Sawroop Dhillon's profile photo
Janel Hanmer's profile photo
Tom Potts's profile photo
Richard Hector's profile photo
Jamie Durity's profile photo
ken kaneki's profile photo

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25832617
J Gen Intern Med. 2015 Apr 2. [Epub ahead of print]
U.S. General Population Estimate for "Excellent" to "Poor" Self-Rated Health Item.
Hays RD, Spritzer KL, Thompson WW, Cella D.
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
The most commonly used self-reported health question asks people to rate their general health from excellent to poor. This is one of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) global health items. Four other items are used for scoring on the PROMIS global physical health scale. Because the single item is used on the majority of large national health surveys in the U.S., it is useful to construct scores that can be compared to U.S. general population norms.
OBJECTIVE:
To estimate the PROMIS global physical health scale score from the responses to the single excellent to poor self-rated health question for use in public health surveillance, research, and clinical assessment.
DESIGN:
A cross-sectional survey of 21,133 individuals, weighted to be representative of the U.S. general population.
PARTICIPANTS:
The PROMIS items were administered via a Web-based survey to 19,601 persons in a national panel and 1,532 subjects from PROMIS research sites. The average age of individuals in the sample was 53 years, 52 % were female, 80 % were non-Hispanic white, and 19 % had a high school degree or lower level of education.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
PROMIS global physical health scale.
KEY RESULTS:
The product-moment correlation of the single item with the PROMIS global physical health scale score was 0.81. The estimated scale score based on responses to the single item ranged from 29 (poor self-rated health, 2.1 SDs worse than the general population mean) to 62 (excellent self-rated health, 1.2 SDs better than the general population mean) on a T-score metric (mean of 50).
CONCLUSIONS:
This item can be used to estimate scores for the PROMIS global physical health scale for use in monitoring population health and achieving public health objectives. The item may also be used for individual assessment, but its reliability (0.52) is lower than that of the PROMIS global health scale (0.81).
1
Add a comment...

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2014 Nov 21. [Epub ahead of print]

The Facilitators of and Barriers to Adherence to Hypertension Treatment Scale.
Fongwa MN1, Nandy K, Yang Q, Hays RD.

BACKGROUND::
Lack of adherence to recommended regimens is a major cause of uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) among African/Black American (AA) women. The national initiative to increase BP control among AAs by 50% makes clear the need for culturally appropriate instruments to assess facilitators of adherence to treatment of hypertension (high BP [HBP]).
OBJECTIVE::
The aim of this study was to develop a culturally sensitive measure of facilitators of and barriers to adherence to hypertension treatment regimens for AA women.
METHODS::
We developed the Facilitators of and Barriers to Adherence to Hypertension Treatment Scale (FATS) with input from focus groups with 20 AA women. A total of 147 AA women from a federally funded inner-city clinic in Los Angeles were enrolled in the study and 70 (48%) completed the survey. Internal consistency reliability was estimated using Cronbach's α.
RESULTS::
Coefficient α for the 18-item FATS was 78. In a multivariate regression model, controlling for BP stage, the FATS was significantly associated with the Hill-Bone High Blood Pressure Compliance Scale (standardized β = .35; P = .0014), the Enhancing Recovery From Coronary Heart Disease Social Support Inventory (β = .42; P = .001), the and CAGE (cut down on your drinking, annoyed by being criticized for your drinking, guilty about drinking, and eye-opener drink in the morning) alcohol screening instrument (β = -.24; P = .05).
DISCUSSION::
The FATS is a culturally sensitive measure for assessing adherence to treatment regimens of HBP in AA women. Further study in other samples of AA women is needed to confirm that the FATS adequately assesses facilitators of adherence to regimens for HBP in AA women.
1
Add a comment...

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
Health-related quality of life in older adult survivors of selected cancers: Data from the SEER-MHOS linkage.

Kent EE1, Ambs A, Mitchell SA, Clauser SB, Smith AW, Hays RD.
Cancer. 2014 Nov 4. doi: 10.1002/cncr.29119. [Epub ahead of print]

BACKGROUND:
Research on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among older adult cancer survivors is mostly confined to breast cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, and lung cancer, which account for 63% of all prevalent cancers. Much less is known about HRQOL in the context of less common cancer sites.
METHODS:
HRQOL was examined with the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, version 1, and the Veterans RAND 12-Item Health Survey in patients with selected cancers (kidney cancer, bladder cancer, pancreatic cancer, upper gastrointestinal cancer, cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx, uterine cancer, cervical cancer, thyroid cancer, melanoma, chronic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma) and in individuals without cancer on the basis of data linked from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry system and the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey. Scale scores, Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores, and a utility metric (Short Form 6D/Veterans RAND 6D), adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and other chronic conditions, were calculated. A 3-point difference in the scale scores and a 2-point difference in the PCS and MCS scores were considered to be minimally important differences.
RESULTS:
Data from 16,095 cancer survivors and 1,224,549 individuals without a history of cancer were included. The results indicated noteworthy deficits in physical health status. Mental health was comparable, although scores for the Role-Emotional and Social Functioning scales were worse for patients with most types of cancer versus those without cancer. Survivors of multiple myeloma and pancreatic malignancies reported the lowest scores, with their PCS/MCS scores less than those of individuals without cancer by 3 or more points.
CONCLUSIONS:
HRQOL surveillance efforts revealed poor health outcomes among many older adults and specifically among survivors of multiple myeloma and pancreatic cancer. Cancer 2014. © 2014 American Cancer Society.
1
Add a comment...

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
Every Monday morning before 6am the sidewalks are watered down in front of 911 Broxton Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024.  Supervisors have been told multiple times that this is a waste of water and the owner of the property has supposedly been informed but the watering continues weekly. #droughtshaming
1
Add a comment...

Ron Hays

Shared publicly  - 
 
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/376302300  
AHRQ is offering an additional position for the CAHPS team, a GS 15.  The description and application information can be found at the above URL.   Closing date is Friday, August 22. The ideal candidate would have expertise in the main areas of interest in CAHPS—patient experience survey development and testing, reporting research and QI in health facilities, but the primary interest is in adding survey expertise to the AHRQ CAHPS team.
JOB SUMMARY: Become a part of the Department that touches the lives of every American!  At the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) you can give back to your community, state, and country by making a difference in the lives of Americans everywhere.  It is the principal agency for protecting the health of citizens.  Join HHS and help to make our world healthier, safer, and better for all Americans. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Q...
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
17 people
Tom Potts's profile photo
Richard Kravitz's profile photo
Mohir Ahmedov's profile photo
Sawroop Dhillon's profile photo
Janel Hanmer's profile photo
Tom Potts's profile photo
Richard Hector's profile photo
Jamie Durity's profile photo
ken kaneki's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Professor
Employment
  • UCLA
    Professor, present
  • RAND
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Cerritos
Previously
Long Beach
Story
Introduction

Ron Hays (PhD, University of California, Riverside, Psychology) is Professor of Medicine at UCLA and a Senior Health Scientist at RAND.    He is one of the Principal Investigators for CAHPS®, a project that has developed measures to assess consumer evaluations of hospitals, nursing homes, group practices, and individual physicians as well as tools to report these assessments to health care providers and consumers.  Dr. Hays has published 430 research articles and 36 book chapters.  He is a member of the special methodology panel for the Journal of General Internal Medicinea former editor-in-chief of Quality of Life Research, and former deputy editor of Medical Care

Education
  • UC Riverside
Basic Information
Gender
Male
One problem was that the in-room heating system was set on automatic and woke me up when it came on in the wee hours of the morning. The front desk said the next day that maintenance could have been called to change it, but when one is tired and not dressed the last thing you want is to have a visit at 2:30am. Upon checkout the front desk staff gave me a complimentary breakfast voucher, but there was only 10 minutes before my shuttle to a meeting and the wait staff wasn't able to even get me coffee that fast.
• • •
Quality: Very GoodFacilities: GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
1 review
Map
Map
Map