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Jude Jackson
Works at The T-Shirt Shoppe
Lived in Aiken, SC
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Jude Jackson

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Needs more shakycam, clearly.
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Jude Jackson

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A little more input (carrying over from the conversation on Facebook):

The gold-collecting sound gets a bit repetitive after a while, so it might be good to have a couple dozen variation; they don't have to be very different, just enough to give them a little texture. Maybe even give a separate sound for the big wads of cash. One thing some games are doing now is changing the pitch of in-game sounds to match the soundtrack,

Another thing is, it took me a while to figure out when the big map changes were triggered. They felt arbitrary, but I bet they would feel really satisfying if there was a little build-up and anticipation when the Phase Shift meter was almost full. Maybe it could glow, or maybe there could be a sound effect, or some other cue.

In general, I can think of a bunch of little things you could do for feedback. Maybe there could be cues when you reach or are reaching certain landmarks for time or points, maybe some better feedback on what exactly your powerups are doing (you picked up what appeared to be a health powerup, but it seemed to make the same sound as all the other powerups, and it didn't highlight in the UI what it was doing). The more different subtle ways you communicate to the player what is happening, in general the more satisfying the experience is. I was even confused about some things that I couldn't tell if they were enemies or powerups, until I concluded that all powerups are square (maybe I'm wrong though).

One last idea: At the very end when the ship explodes, maybe it could be a huge explosion that wipes everything off the map. It wouldn't be much, but it would end the game with a clean slate and lends some finality to it, instead of leaving the clutter of all the enemies that weren't defeated.

tl;dr: More sounds and visual effects pls
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Jude Jackson

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On a chilly Sunday morning, I was out in the driveway with a wire brush scraping flakes of chipped paint and rust off of the corners of my 1979 MG Midget. I peeled back a rubber seal and watched a blanket of rust cascade out...
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Jude Jackson

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It's appealing to popular purity myth anyway. The principles of organic, grass-fed, free-range, and such are mainly based on arbitrary standards that are restrictive without offering any measurable benefits, often at the detriment of sustainability.

That's not to say that the resulting product isn't, in practice, often superior, but the health and sustainability of something organic has nothing to do with whether its pesticides are synthetic or "natural," and as often as not the standards don't actually provide guidelines that ensure a quality product, and often they come with their own pernicious drawbacks.

Grass-fed, for example, means the livestock has literally been fed nothing but grass (and milk of course), which is trivially distinct from livestock that has been fed mostly grass with limited grains. That standard guarantees that the very valuable label is prohibitively expensive (it's hard to graze cattle when you need to slaughter them), and cattle producers are less incentivized to reach a middle ground, seeing that consumers will never know the difference; the dogma of the standard sacrifices the systemic quality and sustainability of beef in service of the purity of the ideal.

The organic standards themselves are built on dubious ideas of purity that are unreasonably restrictive against most producers, and while overall they provide a framework for relatively sustainable small-scale farming, they draw arbitrary boundaries between "natural" and synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, instead of defining meaningful chemical standards. The entire standard, however well-intentioned, is predicated on, and ultimately a slave to, the myth of purity.
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+Jon Care Exactly, beef producers are inclined to produce extremely low-cost and low-quality beef when there isn't an incentive to reach a healthy middle ground.

While small-scale farmers can foster a healthy personal relationship with their customers by producing quality product, even without necessarily meeting the strict organic or grass-fed standards, industrial-scale farms have almost no incentive to raise production costs, because it only directly interfaces with packagers and inspection agencies. For example, if you want to buy kosher food at the supermarket, you only need to look for food that bears the mark of a hechsher, such as OK or OU.

I am definitely saying that the entire concept of organic food is somewhat pernicious because it's not actually about sustainability and health so much as arbitrary ideals of "natural" purity. But more importantly, I'm also saying that its steep requirements works against producers who would be happy to meet in the middle, if only there was a meaningful incentive. The current standards systemically harm the overall quality of food by demanding all-or-nothing commitment.

If there were an evidence-based standard that rewards farmers for balancing health, sustainability, and efficiency, and allowed mediocre-quality product to stand above low-quality product while still incentivizing improvement, that would be miles more useful than a label for following the organic belief diet.
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Jude Jackson

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Soooooo why did circus performers wear their underwear on the outside?
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h0m3st4r's profile photoMocking Jay's profile photoPham Huy Anh's profile photoHarpo Django Rose's profile photo
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If you ever seen a guy just wearing tights like in ballet...it looks kinda awkward...I think the shorts were to provide better coverage but also allow them to have enough flexibility and room to do their stunts without the weight of too much clothing holding them down. :))
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Have him in circles
29 people
Jitney Friekur's profile photo
Eden Wells's profile photo
Hallie Davidson's profile photo
Richard Stevens's profile photo
Kazuna Nakama's profile photo
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Aiken, SC - Lafayette, LA - Charleston, SC
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    Graphic Designer, present
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