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This is an interesting overview with graphs of the development of estimated market share between Bazaar, CVS, Git, Mercurial and Subversion the last eight months. It's based on repository statistics from openhub.net (formerly ohloh.net) and judging by this, Git is doing pretty well.
openhub-repositories - Historic data from the repository comparison at openhub.net
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Why I Don't Hate Git: Hidden Consistency. written on Tuesday, February 17, 2015. Git for me is an interesting topic. I used it initially when git had no UI and cogito was still a thing. I can't say I enjoyed using it much. At the time I did all my development tasks with SVN and the world was ...
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Please write good commit messages. Future generations will thank you and homeless kittens get a home.
A Note About Git Commit Messages. 19 Apr 2008. I want to take a moment to elaborate on what makes a well formed commit message. I think the best practices for commit message formatting is one of the little details that makes Git great. Understandably, some of the first commits to rails.git have ...
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In this post, I want to share with you a technique I learned recently from a colleague. It's a really great trick to keep your history nice and clean, while being able to work and push feature branches. Let's start with the workflow and the problem that generates ...
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Git 2.1.0 is released
To see what's new since version 2.0.0, check out the release notes at <http://git.kernel.org/cgit/git/git.git/tree/Documentation/RelNotes/2.1.0.txt>. Downloads are available from <http://git-scm.com/downloads>.
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Flight rules for git
What is the proper action when you end up in a situation with Git you're not familiar with? This is a set of step-by-step procedures for Git astronauts to help them resolve the issue when things become scary. It's stored as a MarkDown document on GitHub, so if you know how to resolve a situation that's not listed there, create a pull request to help out your fellow astronauts.
git-flight-rules - Flight rules for git - a work in progress!
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New episode of the +GitMinutes podcast out now!
 
Finally another episode! This time we talk to +Luca Milanesio about Gerrit Code Review.
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Git

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Now that Google Code is soon history, here's a nice article about how things are going at GitHub.
Google Code was supposed to spread the open source religion. But then GitHub came along. And GitHub, it turns out, was a much better preacher.
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Asım Hocagil's profile photoDieter Lunn's profile photo
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The ultimate guide to "Do"s and "Don't"s when using Git! Excellent information for both new and old Git users. Also suitable for other version control systems.
Commit Often, Perfect Later, Publish Once: Git Best Practices. Best Practices vary from environment to environment, and there is no One True Answer, but still, this represents a consensus from #git and in some cases helps you frame the discussion for the generation of your very own best ...
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Make your Git workflow easier with aliases or scripts
You probably have many git commands you repeat several times a day. To save keystrokes, you can create git aliases to convert the commands into short and easy commands. But what are the commands you use the most? If you're using bash, one way to find out is to check the .bash_history file. This file contains a list of all the commands you enter on the command line. To find out which git commands you use the most, execute this command:

  grep '^git ' ~/.bash_history | sort | uniq -c | sort -n

This creates a list of all git commands logged in .bash_history with the most used commands at the end of the list. If you're using zsh, replace .bash_history with .zsh_history (default in zsh) or .zhistory if you're using oh-my-zsh.

The aliases are stored in the ~/.gitconfig file, here are some examples:

[alias]
  br = branch
  ci = commit
  # dw: Create word diff
  dw = diff --word-diff
  # dww: Create diff showing single characters
  dww = diff --word-diff --word-diff-regex=.
  # fp: Fetch from all remotes and forget deleted remote branches
  fp = fetch --all --prune
  # lp: git log with patch
  lp = log -p --cc --decorate=short
  st = status -bs
  # rank: Create a list sorted by most active authors
  rank = shortlog -sne
  rv = remote -v
  # delbr: delete all merged branches
  delbr = !git branch -d `git branch --merged | cut -c3DASH`

(In the "delbr" alias, replace DASH with a single hyphen/minus, had to do it this way because Google Plus insisted on using overstrike. Any tips on how to disable G+ formatting in cases like this is very, very welcome.)

Also, if your command is too complicated to be represented by a git alias, you can create a script named git-[command] and store it in a directory in your $PATH. For example, name this script "git-bs" and place it somewhere in your $PATH:

#!/bin/sh
# Wrapper to allow execution of git-bisect in subdirectories
cd "$(git rev-parse --show-toplevel)"
git bisect "$@"

You now have a "git bs" command that works just like "git bisect", but can be executed from any subdirectory in your source tree.

Do you have any favourite aliases or git-* scripts? Please contribute useful examples in the comments!
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Thorsten Biermann's profile photod4vid turn3r (r3nrut)'s profile photoAlex M's profile photoAldo Mendez Reyes's profile photo
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I think it's also worth evangelizing git-extras, which has helped my workflow a lot:
https://github.com/visionmedia/git-extras
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6 myths preventing developers from using Git
"Nowadays, you’ll have a hard time finding a professional developer who doesn’t use a version control system (VCS) such as Git.
But, there are still a few among us who choose not to use a VCS due to preconceived notions they might have about version control.
Here are some myths and excuses that dissuade developers from integrating Git — and any version control system in general — into their workflow."
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Git is the next Unix
This essay was written in 2008, around two and a half year after Git was created. So why post this now, more than six years later? Because, in hindsight, +Avery Pennarun really hit the nail on the head with this post. Git started out not as a revision control system, but a distributed file system that could be built upon and used for all kinds of interesting things. Have a read and get inspired.
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Koustubh Sinkar's profile photoDaniel Fanjul's profile photoStefanie Janine Stölting's profile photoNick Funk's profile photo
 
Totally agree. At our company, we switched from using an SQL database to using git for storing an hierarchical object tree. Works great, faster, smaller on disk and built in revision control. We use libgit2 for it. 
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Have them in circles
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News, tips and tricks about the Git version control system.
Introduction

Git is a free & open source, distributed version control system designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency.

Every Git clone is a full-fledged repository with complete history and full revision tracking capabilities, not dependent on network access or a central server. Branching and merging are fast and easy to do.

Git is used for version control of files, much like tools such as MercurialBazaarSubversionCVSPerforce, and Team Foundation Server.

This page is not an official page by the Git project, but created and updated by Øyvind A. Holm.