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Frank Elliott
9,660 followers -
I am a curious fellow and that trait more than any has enabled me to thrive in very difficult circumstances. I'm an easy person to get along with. Suffering, struggle, and renewal have taught me to be very patient. I'm also struggling to keep up with adding people back. So, if I haven't added you back yet and you really want to sharing and communicate, send me a message. I add people back whenever I believe we have much to share or learn from each other.
I am a curious fellow and that trait more than any has enabled me to thrive in very difficult circumstances. I'm an easy person to get along with. Suffering, struggle, and renewal have taught me to be very patient. I'm also struggling to keep up with adding people back. So, if I haven't added you back yet and you really want to sharing and communicate, send me a message. I add people back whenever I believe we have much to share or learn from each other.

9,660 followers
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Hello Everyone Sorry I've Been Gone For A While, But I'll Be Back

Wanted all of you know that Mary and I have been traveling most of the past month. We've visited the Great Lakes, Lake Erie, and Family and Friends in that area. We also had our first family reunion in ten years on my uncle's farm.After we return from our travels, I'll start to write on Google Plus Again. I've strengthened my legs, built up my stamina, and solved a major issue with my health insurer about getting my very expensive asthma medicine, Xolair, that has saved my life over the past 9 years. Oh what a relief that is to be able to depend on getting the regular dose I need of that.

My health having improved, We're headed down to Tennessee tomorrow to see the full solar eclipse this next Monday. We'll meet up with my sister and her family, my brother, and my niece to drive into the zone of totality near the center of the moon's shadow to catch about 2 mins and 40 seconds of totality early on Monday morning, August 21st. Where my sister lives in Tennessee almost all schools are closed for the big event and they expect huge crowds. Most state, county and national parks are totally filled up, but they will open up at about 7 a.m. to let people park and visit. By the way, my first total solar eclipse viewing was in 1970 when some friends and I decided to go to North Carolina near the coast to Cliffs of the Nice (sp) State Park as part of an astronomy class informal delegation and see the amazing events surrounding an eclipse.

A cool breeze stirred as we approached totality. All animals started to go quiet and then lines of dark and light moved across the community college field we gathered at. I remember the moved across the athletic field at about 10 miles per hour right before the sun blinked out. Then this brilliant hazy, circular light surrounded the sun, the stars and planets appeared. Goose bumps popped up all up and down my arms. I shivered and wondered what must ancient and even colonial people have felt. I understood how they would have been both excited, amazed, and in total fear. What could swallow the sun. I hope many of you have the opportunity to see and feel an event like a total solar eclipse in your lives. It is well worth a long journey.

And hey, here's one of the best eclipse maps I've found allowing us to zoom in and out in the 70 mile path the moon's shadow will make across the USA. http://xjubier.free.fr/en/site_pages/solar_eclipses/TSE_2017_GoogleMapFull.html The New York Times also had one of the best articles I've seen on the eclipse a week or so ago with this feature just a day ago which gathered a series of their excellent posts on this big event. https://www.nytimes.com/news-event/solar-eclipse-2017

P.S. I also found this excellent short piece on some highly recommended apps to photograph the eclipse with your Apple or other smart phones along with other tips.

Post has attachment
Hello Everyone Sorry I've Been Gone For A While, But I'll Be Back

Wanted all of you know that Mary and I have been traveling most of the past month. We've visited the Great Lakes, Lake Erie, and Family and Friends in that area. We also had our first family reunion in ten years on my uncle's farm.After we return from our travels, I'll start to write on Google Plus Again. I've strengthened my legs, built up my stamina, and solved a major issue with my health insurer about getting my very expensive asthma medicine, Xolair, that has saved my life over the past 9 years. Oh what a relief that is to be able to depend on getting the regular dose I need of that.

My health having improved, We're headed down to Tennessee tomorrow to see the full solar eclipse this next Monday. We'll meet up with my sister and her family, my brother, and my niece to drive into the zone of totality near the center of the moon's shadow to catch about 2 mins and 40 seconds of totality early on Monday morning, August 21st. Where my sister lives in Tennessee almost all schools are closed for the big event and they expect huge crowds. Most state, county and national parks are totally filled up, but they will open up at about 7 a.m. to let people park and visit.

And hey, here's one of the best eclipse maps I've found allowing us to zoom in and out in the 70 mile path the moon's shadow will make across the USA. http://xjubier.free.fr/en/site_pages/solar_eclipses/TSE_2017_GoogleMapFull.html The New York Times also had one of the best articles I've seen on the eclipse a week or so ago with this feature just a day ago which gathered a series of their excellent posts on this big event. https://www.nytimes.com/news-event/solar-eclipse-2017

P.S. I also found this excellent short piece on some highly recommended apps to photograph the eclipse with your Apple or other smart phones along with other tips.

Post has attachment
Hello Everyone Sorry I've Been Gone For A While, But I'll Be Back

Wanted all of you know that Mary and I have been traveling most of the past month. We've visited the Great Lakes, Lake Erie, and Family and Friends in that area. We also had our first family reunion in ten years on my uncle's farm.After we return from our travels, I'll start to write on Google Plus Again. I've strengthened my legs, built up my stamina, and solved a major issue with my health insurer about getting my very expensive asthma medicine, Xolair, that has saved my life over the past 9 years. Oh what a relief that is to be able to depend on getting the regular dose I need of that.

My health having improved, We're headed down to Tennessee tomorrow to see the full solar eclipse this next Monday. We'll meet up with my sister and her family, my brother, and my niece to drive into the zone of totality near the center of the moon's shadow to catch about 2 mins and 40 seconds of totality early on Monday morning, August 21st. Where my sister lives in Tennessee almost all schools are closed for the big event and they expect huge crowds. Most state, county and national parks are totally filled up, but they will open up at about 7 a.m. to let people park and visit.

And hey, here's one of the best eclipse maps I've found allowing us to zoom in and out in the 70 mile path the moon's shadow will make across the USA. http://xjubier.free.fr/en/site_pages/solar_eclipses/TSE_2017_GoogleMapFull.html The New York Times also had one of the best articles I've seen on the eclipse a week or so ago with this feature just a day ago which gathered a series of their excellent posts on this big event. https://www.nytimes.com/news-event/solar-eclipse-2017

P.S. I also found this excellent short piece on some highly recommended apps to photograph the eclipse with your Apple or other smart phones along with other tips.

Post has attachment
Wild Turkeys Come For The Elliott Buffet And Entertain Us All

We've had two Turkey couples coming to our yard over the last two to three months. At first, we saw only one very large pair with no chicks. Then, about six weeks ago, they just stopped appearing. We hoped they were ok, but we never saw them at all here or in our neighborhood. We grew worried and concerned. What? No Turkeys. Our winter was not very severe and our spring was relatively warm; hope remained, but we wondered. We thought maybe; there’s just a chance that they’ll return because the eating was good here at the Elliott household. We waited without saying anything to each other to jinx our hopes. We’re both animal lovers you see and our hearts were growing sad. Then, suddenly, a week ago, they reappeared along with their family of about five chicks. So, relieved, deep mutual smiles swelled in our faces. Our day lit up. Life was returning again.

Then, another stroke of happiness. Just about a week later, a slight smaller couple appeared with seven much smaller chicks. The other much taller and "weightier" couple has five little ones; much larger. The size of a full grown chicken. This video is of the small turkey couple having the seven smaller chicks. Their little ones are about the size of two fists, side by side, from end to end with legs about as long as my middle finger. They stay very close to and behind their mom, especially when traveling. Gradually as they’ve come and gone, we’ve seen that they love a nice partially shady spot along our asphalt driveway. They congregate under our big, 60 year old, Lilac bushes on the south side of our driveway. It's a wonderful shady and weather protected area occupying a strip almost 7 feet wide.

The male and female adult turkeys come into this area to eat, but watch from the adjacent grassy area in our back yard. The driveway, adjacent to our neighbors galvanized steel with our Lilac bushes very close to that fence is where we've put out a mix of corn, sunflower seeds, nuts, and a whole bunch of other seeds too. It’s safe their next to the fence. No cat or other prey animal can get through their to our driveway where the chicks eat. The adults watch from the yard so they can help their chicks if there is any trouble. There in the long driveway, they find sixteen to eighteen cup-sized piles of our very good seeds and nuts. We also have a large-sized clear pyrex cooking pan with a gallon of clean water. The smaller chicks stand on the bricks we’ve put on two sides.


The Wild Turkey Pairs come separately, never appearing at the same time, together. They arrive in the late morning and then again in the afternoon to early evening. I think that sometimes they come at night or very early in the morning when we’re not up to see them. Why, every so often I hear the kitties running around and jumping up to their cat trees or kitty perches at our windows. I’m always half asleep when I hear this. Can’t get myself up, but the cats sleep much lighter and have a much better sense that we do of noises, vibrations, and animals and beings moving late at night. Well, needless to say, Wild Large Turkey Couples and Chicks moving early in the morning and especially as work is beginning and again when people come home are very interesting. Very early or very late they are strange shadows moving along with a small line of much smaller bumps. Are they four large lizards with a long tail during those dark hours? Well, The two pairs have even raised a lot of interest and gawking from cars, bicyclers, and walkers and runners going by. At one point some couples got out and even started a traffic jam. We've even had a whole line of cars stop as mother and dad lead their chicks up the street from the nature center we live within a few hundred yards of. At one point, some couples even got out grabbed their phones and took pictures. A good traffic jam started to grow and bonking began. We enjoy these new wild turkeys even more than most of these people. Do most people realize that Wild Turkeys Can Fly Long And High? I know I Did Not until they arrived early this spring and I started to read about them! Imagine, I’ve read that they can fly up into trees as high as 30 or 40 feet above ground and as far as several hundred yards.

This would sure stir a ruckus among Amber, Henri, and Lilly as the birds crossed their motion sensing eyes while dropping in. Even when the turkeys march in by foot all the cats are riveted tight to our back windows and French Doors when the Turkeys come to eat. During the last several days, we've seen the mother turkey teaching the smaller chicks how to scratch the ground for bugs and seeds. The most exciting thing though, is seeing the chicks from the larger couple. They've all started to flap their wings and test their strength. I wouldn't be surprised to see them all drop in one day unannounced. Kind of squadron of the "New Turkey Air Force". I hope they keep it clean and not bomb our pretty gold/silver colored Toyota Camry. Mary had it washed just yesterday and a blue jay or a crow seems to have found it out in the open already and dropped one or more blue and white slimy bombs! I told Mary just this morning that I dropped the passenger's side front window only to the level where the latest bombing showed. Can't imagine what flying turkeys will bring.

We haven't had many large birds stop by over the years, but we have had several mallard couples greet the spring and summer here. Our favorites birds are several cardinal couples that stay with us over each winter as well as the very intelligent crows and blue-jays. The turkeys are our new favorites. The largest couple stands about three and half feet tall. The slightly smaller pair are just over three feet. I've never seen turkeys this big, especially when they stretch their beautiful brown and gold wings out. They've got to be at least six feet from tip to tip and raise a little dust storm in the far back corner of our yard where they've been making their exit.

I'll try to catch photographs and short videos of them several more times this summer, fall, and winter. We enjoy them very much and use no insecticides in our yard. Dandelions, daisies, and large patches of clover help to attract bees too. Up near the stairway going to our deck we have a Bower Vine which grows to be the size of a huge flowering Lilac bush each summer and early fall. The small white flowers last for months and have nectar that is very attractive to bees.

Mary's joined our local gardening club too. It was several years ago and that knowledge had resulted in great beauty and color. She has flowering perennials planted all over our yard and around the house. The neighborhood, with many trees and shade looks like we live in a quiet northern recreational village. Our streets are wide and we see dogs and people doing their rounds and joggers and bicyclers exercising all through the day. It's safe for people, pets, rabbits, and wild turkeys too unless they start to bomb us in earnest. Ha..... ha..... ha..... Fly light, ok!! And remember, please watch for Wild Turkey Couples and their Chicks to pass by quietly as you go and come to work. I’ve read that their population is expanding into many suburban areas and even into cities like Minneapolis in states with large wild areas. Be Careful Of Turkeys. We may all be seeing many more of these majestic birds and lines of their young as first seen here in the “Burbs” of Minneapolis.


#wildturkeys #wildanimals #turkeychicks #turkeyjams #caturday #suburbanturkeys #Minneapolis #NewTurkeyAirForce #BirdBombing #wildatheart

Post has attachment
Wild Turkeys Come For The Elliott Buffet And Entertain Us All

We've had two Turkey couples coming to our yard over the last two to three months. At first, we saw only one very large pair with no chicks. Then, about six weeks ago, they just stopped appearing. We hoped they were ok, but we never saw them at all here or in our neighborhood. We grew worried and concerned. What? No Turkeys. Our winter was not very severe and our spring was relatively warm; hope remained, but we wondered. We thought maybe; there’s just a chance that they’ll return because the eating was good here at the Elliott household. We waited without saying anything to each other to jinx our hopes. We’re both animal lovers you see and our hearts were growing sad. Then, suddenly, a week ago, they reappeared along with their family of about five chicks. So, relieved, deep mutual smiles swelled in our faces. Our day lit up. Life was returning again.

Then, another stroke of happiness. Just about a week later, a slight smaller couple appeared with seven much smaller chicks. The other much taller and "weightier" couple has five little ones; much larger. The size of a full grown chicken. This video is of the small turkey couple having the seven smaller chicks. Their little ones are about the size of two fists, side by side, from end to end with legs about as long as my middle finger. They stay very close to and behind their mom, especially when traveling. Gradually as they’ve come and gone, we’ve seen that they love a nice partially shady spot along our asphalt driveway. They congregate under our big, 60 year old, Lilac bushes on the south side of our driveway. It's a wonderful shady and weather protected area occupying a strip almost 7 feet wide.

The male and female adult turkeys come into this area to eat, but watch from the adjacent grassy area in our back yard. The driveway, adjacent to our neighbors galvanized steel with our Lilac bushes very close to that fence is where we've put out a mix of corn, sunflower seeds, nuts, and a whole bunch of other seeds too. It’s safe their next to the fence. No cat or other prey animal can get through their to our driveway where the chicks eat. The adults watch from the yard so they can help their chicks if there is any trouble. There in the long driveway, they find sixteen to eighteen cup-sized piles of our very good seeds and nuts. We also have a large-sized clear pyrex cooking pan with a gallon of clean water. The smaller chicks stand on the bricks we’ve put on two sides.


The Wild Turkey Pairs come separately, never appearing at the same time, together. They arrive in the late morning and then again in the afternoon to early evening. I think that sometimes they come at night or very early in the morning when we’re not up to see them. Why, every so often I hear the kitties running around and jumping up to their cat trees or kitty perches at our windows. I’m always half asleep when I hear this. Can’t get myself up, but the cats sleep much lighter and have a much better sense that we do of noises, vibrations, and animals and beings moving late at night. Well, needless to say, Wild Large Turkey Couples and Chicks moving early in the morning and especially as work is beginning and again when people come home are very interesting. Very early or very late they are strange shadows moving along with a small line of much smaller bumps. Are they four large lizards with a long tail during those dark hours? Well, The two pairs have even raised a lot of interest and gawking from cars, bicyclers, and walkers and runners going by. At one point some couples got out and even started a traffic jam. We've even had a whole line of cars stop as mother and dad lead their chicks up the street from the nature center we live within a few hundred yards of. At one point, some couples even got out grabbed their phones and took pictures. A good traffic jam started to grow and bonking began. We enjoy these new wild turkeys even more than most of these people. Do most people realize that Wild Turkeys Can Fly Long And High? I know I Did Not until they arrived early this spring and I started to read about them! Imagine, I’ve read that they can fly up into trees as high as 30 or 40 feet above ground and as far as several hundred yards.

This would sure stir a ruckus among Amber, Henri, and Lilly as the birds crossed their motion sensing eyes while dropping in. Even when the turkeys march in by foot all the cats are riveted tight to our back windows and French Doors when the Turkeys come to eat. During the last several days, we've seen the mother turkey teaching the smaller chicks how to scratch the ground for bugs and seeds. The most exciting thing though, is seeing the chicks from the larger couple. They've all started to flap their wings and test their strength. I wouldn't be surprised to see them all drop in one day unannounced. Kind of squadron of the "New Turkey Air Force". I hope they keep it clean and not bomb our pretty gold/silver colored Toyota Camry. Mary had it washed just yesterday and a blue jay or a crow seems to have found it out in the open already and dropped one or more blue and white slimy bombs! I told Mary just this morning that I dropped the passenger's side front window only to the level where the latest bombing showed. Can't imagine what flying turkeys will bring.

We haven't had many large birds stop by over the years, but we have had several mallard couples greet the spring and summer here. Our favorites birds are several cardinal couples that stay with us over each winter as well as the very intelligent crows and blue-jays. The turkeys are our new favorites. The largest couple stands about three and half feet tall. The slightly smaller pair are just over three feet. I've never seen turkeys this big, especially when they stretch their beautiful brown and gold wings out. They've got to be at least six feet from tip to tip and raise a little dust storm in the far back corner of our yard where they've been making their exit.

I'll try to catch photographs and short videos of them several more times this summer, fall, and winter. We enjoy them very much and use no insecticides in our yard. Dandelions, daisies, and large patches of clover help to attract bees too. Up near the stairway going to our deck we have a Bower Vine which grows to be the size of a huge flowering Lilac bush each summer and early fall. The small white flowers last for months and have nectar that is very attractive to bees.

Mary's joined our local gardening club too. It was several years ago and that knowledge had resulted in great beauty and color. She has flowering perennials planted all over our yard and around the house. The neighborhood, with many trees and shade looks like we live in a quiet northern recreational village. Our streets are wide and we see dogs and people doing their rounds and joggers and bicyclers exercising all through the day. It's safe for people, pets, rabbits, and wild turkeys too unless they start to bomb us in earnest. Ha..... ha..... ha..... Fly light, ok!! And remember, please watch for Wild Turkey Couples and their Chicks to pass by quietly as you go and come to work. I’ve read that their population is expanding into many suburban areas and even into cities like Minneapolis in states with large wild areas. Be Careful Of Turkeys. We may all be seeing many more of these majestic birds and lines of their young as first seen here in the “Burbs” of Minneapolis.


#wildturkeys #wildanimals #turkeychicks #turkeyjams #caturday #suburbanturkeys #Minneapolis #NewTurkeyAirForce #BirdBombing #wildatheart

Post has attachment
Wild Turkeys Come For The Elliott Buffet And Entertain Us All

We've had two Turkey couples coming to our yard over the last two to three months. At first, we saw only one very large pair with no chicks. Then, about six weeks ago, they just stopped appearing. We hoped they were ok, but we never saw them at all here or in our neighborhood. We grew worried and concerned. What? No Turkeys. Our winter was not very severe and our spring was relatively warm; hope remained, but we wondered. We thought maybe; there’s just a chance that they’ll return because the eating was good here at the Elliott household. We waited without saying anything to each other to jinx our hopes. We’re both animal lovers you see and our hearts were growing sad. Then, suddenly, a week ago, they reappeared along with their family of about five chicks. So, relieved, deep mutual smiles swelled in our faces. Our day lit up. Life was returning again.

Then, another stroke of happiness. Just about a week later, a slight smaller couple appeared with seven much smaller chicks. The other much taller and "weightier" couple has five little ones; much larger. The size of a full grown chicken. This video is of the small turkey couple having the seven smaller chicks. Their little ones are about the size of two fists, side by side, from end to end with legs about as long as my middle finger. They stay very close to and behind their mom, especially when traveling. Gradually as they’ve come and gone, we’ve seen that they love a nice partially shady spot along our asphalt driveway. They congregate under our big, 60 year old, Lilac bushes on the south side of our driveway. It's a wonderful shady and weather protected area occupying a strip almost 7 feet wide.

The male and female adult turkeys come into this area to eat, but watch from the adjacent grassy area in our back yard. The driveway, adjacent to our neighbors galvanized steel with our Lilac bushes very close to that fence is where we've put out a mix of corn, sunflower seeds, nuts, and a whole bunch of other seeds too. It’s safe their next to the fence. No cat or other prey animal can get through their to our driveway where the chicks eat. The adults watch from the yard so they can help their chicks if there is any trouble. There in the long driveway, they find sixteen to eighteen cup-sized piles of our very good seeds and nuts. We also have a large-sized clear pyrex cooking pan with a gallon of clean water. The smaller chicks stand on the bricks we’ve put on two sides.


The Wild Turkey Pairs come separately, never appearing at the same time, together. They arrive in the late morning and then again in the afternoon to early evening. I think that sometimes they come at night or very early in the morning when we’re not up to see them. Why, every so often I hear the kitties running around and jumping up to their cat trees or kitty perches at our windows. I’m always half asleep when I hear this. Can’t get myself up, but the cats sleep much lighter and have a much better sense that we do of noises, vibrations, and animals and beings moving late at night. Well, needless to say, Wild Large Turkey Couples and Chicks moving early in the morning and especially as work is beginning and again when people come home are very interesting. Very early or very late they are strange shadows moving along with a small line of much smaller bumps. Are they four large lizards with a long tail during those dark hours? Well, The two pairs have even raised a lot of interest and gawking from cars, bicyclers, and walkers and runners going by. At one point some couples got out and even started a traffic jam. We've even had a whole line of cars stop as mother and dad lead their chicks up the street from the nature center we live within a few hundred yards of. At one point, some couples even got out grabbed their phones and took pictures. A good traffic jam started to grow and bonking began. We enjoy these new wild turkeys even more than most of these people. Do most people realize that Wild Turkeys Can Fly Long And High? I know I Did Not until they arrived early this spring and I started to read about them! Imagine, I’ve read that they can fly up into trees as high as 30 or 40 feet above ground and as far as several hundred yards.

This would sure stir a ruckus among Amber, Henri, and Lilly as the birds crossed their motion sensing eyes while dropping in. Even when the turkeys march in by foot all the cats are riveted tight to our back windows and French Doors when the Turkeys come to eat. During the last several days, we've seen the mother turkey teaching the smaller chicks how to scratch the ground for bugs and seeds. The most exciting thing though, is seeing the chicks from the larger couple. They've all started to flap their wings and test their strength. I wouldn't be surprised to see them all drop in one day unannounced. Kind of squadron of the "New Turkey Air Force". I hope they keep it clean and not bomb our pretty gold/silver colored Toyota Camry. Mary had it washed just yesterday and a blue jay or a crow seems to have found it out in the open already and dropped one or more blue and white slimy bombs! I told Mary just this morning that I dropped the passenger's side front window only to the level where the latest bombing showed. Can't imagine what flying turkeys will bring.

We haven't had many large birds stop by over the years, but we have had several mallard couples greet the spring and summer here. Our favorites birds are several cardinal couples that stay with us over each winter as well as the very intelligent crows and blue-jays. The turkeys are our new favorites. The largest couple stands about three and half feet tall. The slightly smaller pair are just over three feet. I've never seen turkeys this big, especially when they stretch their beautiful brown and gold wings out. They've got to be at least six feet from tip to tip and raise a little dust storm in the far back corner of our yard where they've been making their exit.

I'll try to catch photographs and short videos of them several more times this summer, fall, and winter. We enjoy them very much and use no insecticides in our yard. Dandelions, daisies, and large patches of clover help to attract bees too. Up near the stairway going to our deck we have a Bower Vine which grows to be the size of a huge flowering Lilac bush each summer and early fall. The small white flowers last for months and have nectar that is very attractive to bees.

Mary's joined our local gardening club too. It was several years ago and that knowledge had resulted in great beauty and color. She has flowering perennials planted all over our yard and around the house. The neighborhood, with many trees and shade looks like we live in a quiet northern recreational village. Our streets are wide and we see dogs and people doing their rounds and joggers and bicyclers exercising all through the day. It's safe for people, pets, rabbits, and wild turkeys too unless they start to bomb us in earnest. Ha..... ha..... ha..... Fly light, ok!! And remember, please watch for Wild Turkey Couples and their Chicks to pass by quietly as you go and come to work. I’ve read that their population is expanding into many suburban areas and even into cities like Minneapolis in states with large wild areas. Be Careful Of Turkeys. We may all be seeing many more of these majestic birds and lines of their young as first seen here in the “Burbs” of Minneapolis.


#wildturkeys #wildanimals #turkeychicks #turkeyjams #caturday #suburbanturkeys #Minneapolis #NewTurkeyAirForce #BirdBombing #wildatheart


Post has attachment
Max The Paddle-Boarding Cat: What Does It Mean To Be Special & Beloved?

I think you're going to discover a very relaxing and rewarding experience if you click on the picture below. Click on the handsome soaked Garfield-like cat just below, when clicked (he's like one of the cats in Laura Moss's new book Adventure Cats) he takes you for a surprising and "off the chart" experience with a gifted and very flexible local cat named Max who's become quite a celebrity. We don't think of cats as adventuresome explorers who love to expand their horizons, but Max is not a typical cat. Like our Henri, who loves to knock bright colored sparkling balls downstairs after carrying them through our kitchen in his mouth, Max has found his great love in life through his owner Craig Reed from local Forest Lake. He and Craig both love to paddleboard in the stillness, sounds of nature, and playful people found occupying dozens of little lakes around the Minneapolis and St. Paul area. Like Henri, he saw his human companion playing at and enjoying a hobby or way of relaxing or being and said, "That looks good on me too. Let's try it out."

Well, I think that's no surprise, but I have confession. This story, like others like it, continues the melting and softening of my heart. Henri's too. We both said, "See we're not the only ones who revel in our relationships and encourage our critters to step out into the real world and life-affirming relationships all around us." We truly relate and are in effect soul mates. No surprise right? Another confession: cats are some of my closest human friends...... yes, really. One more thing; as you start the article, there's a special picture of Max with his companion ,Craig Reed from Forest Lake, who adopted him seven years ago. He taught Max gradually how to join in on all the lakeside fun. Max is a 16 1/2 pound tabby laying down on the paddleboard and getting more warm zzzzz's out on the lake right up against Craig's leg. This wonderful article in our Star Tribune local paper (Minneapolis) is certainly a rarity. It features an "adventuring" cat. Whether it's a paddleboard, pontoon boat or kayak, Max the cat will ride it. The article also mentions Laura Moss's new book: "Adventure Cats", featuring felines like Max who have broader perspectives and insights on the world around them. Thought you would enjoy this. Thanks to Mary for sharing this with me.

Oh, almost lost a link. Here's one missing link found to Laura Moss's site, Adventure Cats. http://www.adventurecats.org/about/ I really enjoyed it because she presents cats in a rare light, as individuals with their own likes, fears, needs, and yes -- inquisitive, exploring minds. And yes, now I know, it should not be surprise: Henri's special love of sparkly balls and the fact that he's learned to knock them down our stairs, watching them all the thirteen steps down. Then he gathers them up, carries them in his mouth, and knocks them back down again. And he meows for Mary and I to come and watch, play, and retrieve lost balls. He's learned to train his humans well!! You may also need this link too if the photograph I've included disappears: http://www.startribune.com/meet-max-the-paddleboarding-cat-of-forest-lake/430416233/

#catcompanions #specialfriends #animalfriends #wellbeing #fun #livingwithanimals #wellbeing #psychology #pets #animals #wellbeing

Post has attachment
Max The Paddle-Boarding Cat: What Does It Mean To Be Special & Beloved?

I think you're going to discover a very relaxing and rewarding experience if you click on the picture below. Click on the handsome soaked Garfield-like cat just below, when clicked (he's like one of the cats in Laura Moss's new book Adventure Cats) he takes you for a surprising and "off the chart" experience with a gifted and very flexible local cat named Max who's become quite a celebrity. We don't think of cats as adventuresome explorers who love to expand their horizons, but Max is not a typical cat. Like our Henri, who loves to knock bright colored sparkling balls downstairs after carrying them through our kitchen in his mouth, Max has found his great love in life through his owner Craig Reed from local Forest Lake. He and Craig both love to paddleboard in the stillness, sounds of nature, and playful people found occupying dozens of little lakes around the Minneapolis and St. Paul area. Like Henri, he saw his human companion playing at and enjoying a hobby or way of relaxing or being and said, "That looks good on me too. Let's try it out."

Well, I think that's no surprise, but I have confession. This story, like others like it, continues the melting and softening of my heart. Henri's too. We both said, "See we're not the only ones who revel in our relationships and encourage our critters to step out into the real world and life-affirming relationships all around us." We truly relate and are in effect soul mates. No surprise right? Another confession: cats are some of my closest human friends...... yes, really. One more thing; as you start the article, there's a special picture of Max with his companion ,Craig Reed from Forest Lake, who adopted him seven years ago. He taught Max gradually how to join in on all the lakeside fun. Max is a 16 1/2 pound tabby laying down on the paddleboard and getting more warm zzzzz's out on the lake right up against Craig's leg. This wonderful article in our Star Tribune local paper (Minneapolis) is certainly a rarity. It features an "adventuring" cat. Whether it's a paddleboard, pontoon boat or kayak, Max the cat will ride it. The article also mentions Laura Moss's new book: "Adventure Cats", featuring felines like Max who have broader perspectives and insights on the world around them. Thought you would enjoy this. Thanks to Mary for sharing this with me.

Oh, almost lost a link. Here's one missing link found to Laura Moss's site, Adventure Cats. http://www.adventurecats.org/about/ I really enjoyed it because she presents cats in a rare light, as individuals with their own likes, fears, needs, and yes -- inquisitive, exploring minds. And yes, now I know, it should not be surprise: Henri's special love of sparkly balls and the fact that he's learned to knock them down our stairs, watching them all the thirteen steps down. Then he gathers them up, carries them in his mouth, and knocks them back down again. And he meows for Mary and I to come and watch, play, and retrieve lost balls. He's learned to train his humans well!! You may also need this link too if the photograph I've included disappears: http://www.startribune.com/meet-max-the-paddleboarding-cat-of-forest-lake/430416233/

#catcompanions #specialfriends #animalfriends #wellbeing #fun #livingwithanimals #wellbeing #psychology #pets #animals #wellbeing

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Max The Paddle-Boarding Cat: What Does It Mean To Be Special & Beloved?

I think you're going to discover a very relaxing and rewarding experience if you click on the picture below. Click on the handsome soaked Garfield-like cat just below, when clicked (he's like one of the cats in Laura Moss's new book Adventure Cats) he takes you for a surprising and "off the chart" experience with a gifted and very flexible local cat named Max who's become quite a celebrity. We don't think of cats as adventuresome explorers who love to expand their horizons, but Max is not a typical cat. Like our Henri, who loves to knock bright colored sparkling balls downstairs after carrying them through our kitchen in his mouth, Max has found his great love in life through his owner Craig Reed from local Forest Lake. He and Craig both love to paddleboard in the stillness, sounds of nature, and playful people found occupying dozens of little lakes around the Minneapolis and St. Paul area. Like Henri, he saw his human companion playing at and enjoying a hobby or way of relaxing or being and said, "That looks good on me too. Let's try it out" .

Well, I think that's no surprise, but I have confession. This story, like others like it, continues the melting and softening of my heart. Henri's too. We both said, "See we're not the only ones who revel in our relationships and encourage our critters to step out into the real world and life-affirming relationships all around us." We truly relate and are in effect soul mates. No surprise right? Another confession: cats are some of my closest human friends...... yes, really. One more thing; as you start the article, there's a special picture of Max with his companion ,Craig Reed from Forest Lake, who adopted him seven years ago. He taught Max gradually how to join in on all the lakeside fun. Max is a 16 1/2 pound tabby laying down on the paddleboard and getting more warm zzzzz's out on the lake right up against Craig's leg. This wonderful article in our Star Tribune local paper (Minneapolis) is certainly a rarity. It features an "adventuring" cat. Whether it's a paddleboard, pontoon boat or kayak, Max the cat will ride it. The article also mentions Laura Moss's new book: "Adventure Cats", featuring felines like Max who have broader perspectives and insights on the world around them. Thought you would enjoy this. Thanks to Mary for sharing this with me.

Oh, almost lost a link. Here's one missing link found to Laura Moss's site, Adventure Cats. http://www.adventurecats.org/about/ I really enjoyed it because she presents cats in a rare light, as individuals with their own likes, fears, needs, and yes -- inquisitive, exploring minds. And yes, now I know, it should not be surprise: Henri's special love of sparkly balls and the fact that he's learned to knock them down our stairs, watching them all the thirteen steps down. Then he gathers them up, carries them in his mouth, and knocks them back down again. And he meows for Mary and I to come and watch, play, and retrieve lost balls. He's learned to train his humans well!! You may also need this link too if the photograph I've included disappears: http://www.startribune.com/meet-max-the-paddleboarding-cat-of-forest-lake/430416233/

#catcompanions #specialfriends #animalfriends #wellbeing #fun #livingwithanimals #wellbeing #psychology #pets #animals #wellbeing

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Filling Our Minds With Pleasure Of Life Returning And Learning To See Ourselves More Clearly In The Reflection Of Our Communion With Life

This is one of my favorite animal/pet/cat/wildlife posts from last year. I wrote it on April 16, 2016, the first weekend we were able to open our doors and windows for the kitties. They have all kinds of "high kitty tree posts" or padded attached perches located at every single window or door in the house. When we opened up after a long winter, they lept up high. It was as if they were people bursting forward to make a gold claim in the Yukon. A great aunt of mine actually went up to the Yukon and then set up a motel further south along Lake Superior. Here it is like our kitties go on a "Vision Quest". They draw in the air like their mouth's are a huge slurping straw. I can watch their gaze of deep delight as all those wonderful and lively molecules of spring pass over their highly developed sense organs. For them it is nothing like my dulled human sense of smell. It is the real deal and tells them the entire natural history of our neighborhood. Each cat, duck, raccoon, wild-turkey, chipmunk, bird, and squirrel tells them a story. They are literally drinking in the molecular history of most of our little wild and domesticated critters. Yes, I feed all those critters and enjoy it, but it's mostly to watch their pleasure that I do it. I hope you enjoy my story of them that follows. It tells me much more about what I love and care for than I would ever have learned by myself. Why do we live in community with other animals and people? It is because we see ourselves much more clearly in our reflection through them. Click on the words just below or on the picture. You'll be able to read my story of new spring through them and the photographs of how they enjoy it. Your Friend Frank and Amber, Henri, and big Lilly.
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