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Mike Amundsen
917 followers -
livin' life in lowercase
livin' life in lowercase

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"Automated decision-making shatters the social safety net, criminalizes the poor, intensifies discrimination, and compromises our deepest national values." #readingToday

Automated decision-making shatters the social safety net, criminalizes the poor, intensifies discrimination, and compromises our deepest national values. It reframes shared social decisions about who we are and who we want to be as systems engineering problems. And while the most sweeping digital decision-making tools are tested in what could be called “low rights environments” where there are few expectations of political accountability and transparency, systems first designed for the poor will eventually be used on everyone.

"Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor" by Virginia Eubanks

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/eO9PuVj
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"This is the picture of cosmic civilization. It’s the explanation for the Fermi Paradox." #readingToday

“The universe is a dark forest. Every civilization is an armed hunter stalking through the trees like a ghost, gently pushing aside branches that block the path and trying to tread without sound. Even breathing is done with care. The hunter has to be careful, because everywhere in the forest are stealthy hunters like him. If he finds other life—another hunter, an angel or a demon, a delicate infant or a tottering old man, a fairy or a demigod—there’s only one thing he can do: open fire and eliminate them. In this forest, hell is other people. An eternal threat that any life that exposes its own existence will be swiftly wiped out. This is the picture of cosmic civilization. It’s the explanation for the Fermi Paradox.”

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/gYQ9kEX

The Dark Forest (Remembrance of Earth's Past)" by Cixin Liu, Joel Martinsen
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"This narrative by Nathaniel Rich is a work of history, addressing the 10-year period from 1979 to 1989: the decisive decade when humankind first came to a broad understanding of the causes and dangers of climate change." #readingToday

Complementing the text is a series of aerial photographs and videos, all shot over the past year by George Steinmetz. With support from the Pulitzer Center, this two-part article is based on 18 months of reporting and well over a hundred interviews. It tracks the efforts of a small group of American scientists, activists and politicians to raise the alarm and stave off catastrophe. It will come as a revelation to many readers — an agonizing revelation — to understand how thoroughly they grasped the problem and how close they came to solving it.
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"What you perceive right now is a consequence of the history of your perceptions that led to this point." #readingToday

Our perceptions are the feedback onto our perceptions, creating a self-reinforcing narrative, albeit an effective one for survival, and one that makes life livable. What you perceive right now is a consequence of the history of your perceptions that led to this point. And as soon as you perceive it, that perception too becomes part of your future past, thereby contributing to what you will see in the future.

Deviate: The Science of Seeing Differently" by Beau Lotto

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/cdKtH1Q
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"Everything you see—everything—exists in only one place: in here. Inside your head." #readingToday

Everything you see—everything—exists in only one place: in here. Inside your head. Everything you experience is only taking place inside your brain and body, constructed in “the space between,” arising from the ecology of interaction between you and your world of others, and in the space between you and the world of yourself.

Deviate: The Science of Seeing Differently" by Beau Lotto

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/eWAFHMc
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"Research has found that successful leaders share three behavioral traits: they lead by example, admit their mistakes, and see positive qualities in others." #readingToday

Research has found that successful leaders share three behavioral traits: they lead by example, admit their mistakes, and see positive qualities in others. All three are linked to spaces of play. Leading by example creates a space that is trusted—and without trust, there is no play. Admitting mistakes is to celebrate uncertainty. Seeing qualities in others is to encourage diversity.

Deviate: The Science of Seeing Differently" by Beau Lotto

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/f10Ysv3
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"You wouldn’t want to add updates and upgrades to a fundamentally crappy cell phone; This mirrors how the brain develops." #readingToday

"In other words, you wouldn’t want to add updates and upgrades to a fundamentally crappy cell phone; you should only do this for one that is already strong at its core. This mirrors how the brain develops. When it grows, it is adding connections, and therefore complexifying itself: adding dimensions to the space of possibility, and forging new pathways of neuroelectric connectivity. But it’s doing so according to feedback on what worked and didn’t work in the past. The internal patterns of activity that worked (the useful assumptions) are reinforced, and those that didn’t work (the no-longer-useful assumptions) are lost."

Deviate: The Science of Seeing Differently" by Beau Lotto

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/gMQBUro
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"If you want to get from A to B in your life, accept that everything you do is a reflex grounded in your assumptions." #readingToday


The point about perception here is that if you want to get from A to B in your life, whether you’re transitioning personally or professionally, the first challenge is to accept that everything you do is a reflex grounded in your assumptions. So we need humility. Though change never happens without it, by itself that is never enough. Once we come to accept that all we see and do is grounded in our assumptions, we are nonetheless usually blind to the reasons why we do what we do. The next challenge to deviation, then, is to discover what your assumptions are. This usually involves other people who are foreign to you, hence the power of the diversity of groups. The next step is to complexify your assumptions—and thus redefine normality—by actively engaging in the contrasting nature of the world. That’s what Destin did, as did the people who wore the feelSpace magnetic belt and acquired heightened powers of navigation.

Another key for seeing differently is not to move through the world comfortably. Whether literally or metaphorically, in one’s body or in one’s mind, we need to get dirty, to get lost, to get swallowed by the experience. This could sound clichéd, but it’s nonetheless true… and necessary to reiterate loudly, given the speed of the sprint in which much of the Western world is running toward health and safety. (We’re rushing so fast toward mitigating against short-term risk that to stand still in our society is to become relatively risky!) Don’t be a tourist of your own life, taking your assumptions with you wherever you go. Leave them in the lift at JFK or at Terminal 5 at Heathrow. And when you get to wherever you’re going, buy groceries, ask for directions in the local language, navigate an unknown transit system, try to remember how to get back to your hotel rather than referring constantly to your Google map. And through it all, listen to your emotions so you know whether you’ve traveled far enough. Only in this way will you be able to discover the mishaps and misfits that all-inclusive luxury vacations rob you of. Only then will you discover the invisible in yourself by assuming you might be wrong about your “knowledge” of things. Seek new, more generalizable assumptions through real-world engagement in concert with your delusional powers, and in doing so, you will alter the probabilities of your future reflexive responses by increasing the chances of beating the kurtotic biases that past experiences have given you. This is how you institute new and better assumptions and “travel” to new perceptions. In short, don’t shift… expand!

But once you have unblinded your assumptions, experimenting with new ones is not an easy process, and our very own evolution often steers us away from it. Our brains want to avoid it, even if the results will be generative for us. This brings us to the second biggest challenge to creativity: we are afraid of the dark.

"Deviate: The Science of Seeing Differently" by Beau Lotto

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/h604z8C
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"Studies have shown that other people can be better at predicting our behavior—at usefully predicting us—than we ourselves are." #readingToday

"If you want to understand humans or a situation generated by humans, you need to know their assumptions. But don’t ask them! And if you want to understand yourself, sometimes the best answer exists in another person. Studies have shown that other people can be better at predicting our behavior—at usefully predicting us—than we ourselves are."

Deviate: The Science of Seeing Differently" by Beau Lotto

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/b6XNdBN
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"One of the most important obstacles to seeing: our assumptions are as blind to us as we are to them." #readingToday



This is one of the most important obstacles to seeing differently and deviating from uninspired, conventional perceptions: our assumptions are as blind to us as we are to them. This bias-blindness is the foundation of what I referred to earlier as the Physics of No. The person saying no doesn’t necessarily know why, but only that they always have done so in that circumstance previously and so behave as if their perception is an immutable law of nature. This in turn makes it impossible to question, until we gain sight (awareness of our assumptions).

"Deviate: The Science of Seeing Differently" by Beau Lotto

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/dwiPPRE
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