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Tim Moss
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The Next Challenge: expedition resources and adventure support.
The Next Challenge: expedition resources and adventure support.

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What is the thinnest camping mat you can get? This is exactly the kind of niche, nerdy question that I love so I was delighted to receive just such a query through my website this week. Quick answer: Get an 8mm-thick Multimat Superlite 8 or pay to import…

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On first reading, nothing about ‘cycling a beach cruiser around Costa Rica’ sounds especially tough. It sounds like a fun trip, somewhere warm. The reality, however, is that Next Challenge Grant winner Dylan Haskin had quite an adventure. A month spent…

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This I my latest review of camping mats.

There is plenty of detail for enthusiasts but I've aimed to make it as easy as possible for those who just want a camping mat and aren't interested in the geekery (apparently, such people exist).

Questions/suggestions welcome.

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2016 Next Challenge Grant winner Thommo Hart recently walked and ran one thousand miles across South Africa, with his friend Simphiwe Ngcobo. They dragged carts filled with their supplies across tar so hot you could fry an egg on it (which they did). They…

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Earlier this year, Laura and I undertook an expedition to walk across the frozen surface of Lake Baikal in Siberia. It was a beautiful place. As well as taking lots of photos, we did some filming. Given that it took us four months just to edit the photos,…

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In March, Laura and I travelled to Lake Baikal in Siberia to walk across its frozen surface. This blog post shares our photos. Check back next Monday for the video.   We started out from Olkhon Island, an area famous for Shamanism…   Before we left home,…

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Starting in the summer of 2013, Laura and I spent 16 months cycling around the world. We travelled 13,000 miles through 27 countries and 4 continents, met dozens of fascinating characters and saw all manner of things. It felt like we had enough…

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Early on Saturday morning, several groups of women (and a few men) gathered with their bikes at a range of locations across the UK. Their intention was to cycle 100 miles.

Most of them had never cycled that far before.

Many of them were not sure that they could.

By the end of the day, all of them had.

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I joined the Leeds group. It was coordinated by my wife, Laura, and her friend Amanda.

14 of us huddled outside the Town Hall in the drizzle at 8am.

Some were on speedy-looking road bikes, dressed in lycra, with SPD shoes clipped onto their pedals. Others were on heavy sit-up-and-beg bikes, wearing shorts and t-shirt, and pedalling in plimsoles.

Some looked like young, toned, athletics sorts. Some did not.

When Laura asked how many people had cycled a hundred miles before, very few hands went up.

I have cycled around the world, written a book about cycling and set a (niche) cycling world record. But I think I have only once cycled a hundred miles in day and it was many years ago.

I do a lot of exercise and a fair bit of cycling. I was reasonably confident I would get round. But I couldn’t be sure about everyone.

“I haven’t been out on my bike for ages”, one of them told me.

“My only practice was 25 miles along the canal”, said another, as she dropped gears on the first hill.

Research has shown that women tend to underestimate their sporting abilities, while men do the opposite. Perhaps we would be alright.

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It took us a little over 12 hours. There were cafe stops and supermarket shops. There was a lot of waiting for people at junctions (always tricky with large groups) and lots of working out which way to turn at those junctions (always tricky). There were flat tyres (three of them, all the same tyre).

But all 14 of us went the distance. No one was left behind, no one dropped out. The only time the group split up was when one of us had to press ahead to get home in time for her childcare duties that evening.

We were just one of seven groups undertaking the TAS 100 challenge on Saturday. Others set off from Edinburgh, Bristol, Aviemore, London, Kent and Wales.

I should say that two groups actually did 100km rather than 100 miles but, since both routes were completed off-road, I think they may have worked harder than we did anyway.

And if I’m mentioning that, then I should also acknowledge the Bristol lot were having so much fun that they pressed on to the 200km mark.

The whole day was thanks to The Adventure Syndicate. They’re a group of female endurance cyclists who aim to get more people into cycling (particularly women and girls) and build their confidence on bikes. Saturday must surely have achieved those aims in spades.

I am proud to disclose that Laura is a director of The Adventure Syndicate (she came up with the TAS 100 idea) and I count several of their members as friends. It is a fantastic initiative and a refreshing change for ‘adventurers’ to set up an organisation aimed at helping others rather than just promoting their own endeavours.

One of their tag lines is: “You are capable of more than you think”

Saturday proved that we are.
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You can read more about The Adventure Syndicate and sign-up for their next event at http://www.theadventuresyndicate.com.

(See this article on my website with photos from the rides here: thenextchallenge.org/capable-more-than-realise/)



thenextchallenge.org/capable-more-than-realise/

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Early on Saturday morning, several groups of women (and a few men) gathered with their bikes at a range of locations across the UK. Their intention was to cycle 100 miles. Most of them had never cycled that far before. Many of them were not sure that they…

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Two weeks ago, we waved off the first two winners of the 2017 Next Challenge Grant: Libby and Lisa set off run and cycle up every Munro in Scotland. They’ve already ticked off 31 mountains and you can follow the rest of their progress on Twitter. This…
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