Profile

Cover photo
Blake Sabatinelli
17,563 views
AboutPosts

Stream

Blake Sabatinelli

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Telling Stories through Photos

How do you imagine social interaction within 10 years, taking into consideration the impact of technology on human relations? This is my answer - I'm interested to hear yours, too!

We’ve used writing to communicate for over 8,000 years. However, the very first writing systems weren’t much more than simplified images: pictures used to represent concepts. Egyptian hieroglyphs, Sumerian cuneiform, and Chinese logographs were basic pictures. Our species’ first recorded communications were not with letters, but with pictures.

The future of social interaction is, in many ways, a return to our earliest form of communication. In ten years, we’ll be communicating with pictures and photos, by sharing what we see and what we’re doing with those closest to us.

Photographs can evoke compassion, anger, nostalgia, and the entire landscape of human emotions in ways that text alone cannot. With pictures, we’re not just telling our friends and family what we’re thinking - we’re showing them. We’re inviting them to be a part of our lives in a richer and very personal way.

With the advent of cellular phones, everyone can be a photographer and share their pictures. 250 million photos are uploaded to Facebook every day. Instagram, founded just two years ago, receives 5 million new photo uploads  daily. Pinterest broke the 10 million user mark faster than any site in history. The majority of the recent great successes on the Internet have been based on image sharing.

Over the course of the last several weeks, I’ve had the opportunity to beta-test Google Glass - a futuristic heads-up display that replicates several cell-phone functions on a small screen mere millimeters from my eye. It’s revolutionary, and I don’t just say that because I work at Google. Time Magazine named Glass one of the best inventions of 2012, naming it “the device that will make augmented reality part of our daily lives.”

The most compelling feature of Google Glass isn’t the turn-by-turn navigation or the ability to read text messages or emails.  For me, the feature that gets the most use is the seamless sharing of pictures I’ve taken.

The pictures aren’t profound. I sent picture of an amusing warning label to a friend. I took a picture of a sunrise on the way to work and sent it to my mom. I take (probably too many) pictures of my cat to share with my brother.

In sharing those photos, I’m saying more than “look at a picture of my cat.” I’m saying “Hey. You’re important to me. I’m thinking about you, and this small detail in my life reminded me of you.”

Photography comes from the Greek photos (light) + graphos (write). Photography is, in its most authentic form, writing with light. Rather than using words to tell a story, we’ll use pictures to show that story.

We’re on the cusp of a major transition. As technology advances, in-phone cameras improve, and heads-up displays become a part of our day-to-day life, we’ll start taking and sharing pictures in ways we haven’t before. We’ll deepen and strengthen our relationships with the people closest to us by inviting them into our lives through photography.

Ten years from now, it will be hard to imagine a world where we didn’t communicate using pictures. Like our earliest ancestors did, we’ll be sharing our thoughts and dreams not with words, but with pictures. As we continue to evolve into a globalized economy, travel more, and spend more time physically apart from our loved ones, we’ll be able to share our day-to-day lives with those who are most important to us.

#photography  
1
Add a comment...

Blake Sabatinelli

Shared publicly  - 
 
What Chris said
 
I don't care if you don't like country music. I say I don't, either. But this is some GREAT musical skill. 
1
Add a comment...

Blake Sabatinelli

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
If there's one thing that can sour the mood of travelers everywhere, it's a flight delay. BWI and Dulles both make appearances in Travel & Leisure's list of top American airports for delays.
1
Add a comment...

Blake Sabatinelli

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
In a reversal of the kind of protests we usually see about smoking, a group of students and faculty members at George Washington University want to preserve their ability to smoke on campus.
1
Add a comment...

Blake Sabatinelli

Shared publicly  - 
 
Stunning
1
Add a comment...

Blake Sabatinelli

Shared publicly  - 
 
I would tell viewers the whole story from their point of view #ifihadglass
1
Add a comment...

Blake Sabatinelli

Shared publicly  - 
1
Dave Francois's profile photo
 
Yeah weird winter weather
Add a comment...

Blake Sabatinelli

Shared publicly  - 
 
You haven't liked my stations Google+ page yet? For shame...
ABC7 is always on your side in the D.C. area!
1
Add a comment...

Blake Sabatinelli

Shared publicly  - 
 
Hey, +ABC7 News is on Google+
ABC7 is always on your side in the D.C. area!
1
Add a comment...

Blake Sabatinelli

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Is this how you roll in Flavor Town?"
 
New York Times reviewer loses it over Guy Fieri's restaurant.

New York Times food critic Pete Wells pens an opinion about the new Times Square restaurant Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar in what can only be described as a meltdown.

The entire review is made up of questions leveled at Fieri himself. As in:

"Did you notice that the menu was an unreliable predictor of what actually came to the table?" Or: "What exactly about a small salad with four or five miniature croutons makes Guy’s Famous Big Bite Caesar (a) big (b) famous or (c) Guy’s, in any meaningful sense?"

Delicious.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/14/dining/reviews/restaurant-review-guys-american-kitchen-bar-in-times-square.html
1
Add a comment...
Story
Tagline
Just a journalist
Links
Work
Occupation
Director, Digital Solutions at the E.W. Scripps Company