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What are the Penalties to Dui / Dwi in New Jersey ?

We Decided to write this article due to the fact a majority of Residents are unaware of the Severe Consequences and Penalties for Dui / Dwi convictions in the State . Actually gets really costly and last's for some time .

The Penalties

The following are the penalties for driving under the influence; they vary according to BAC level and how many times you've been caught:

First offense with BAC of 0.08% but less than 0.10%:

License suspension: 3 months.
Imprisonment: Maximum 30 days.
Fine: $250 to $400.
Intoxicated Driver Resource Center (IDRC): Mandatory 12 to 48 hours.
Intoxicated Driver Resource Center (IDRC) Fee: $230.
Alcohol Education and Rehabilitation Fund Fee: $100
Drunk Driving Fund: $100
Neighborhood Services Fund: $75
Surcharges: $1,000 per year for 3 years.

First offense with BAC of 0.10% or higher:

License suspension: 7 to 12 months.
Imprisonment: Maximum 30 days.
Fine: $300 to $500.
Intoxicated Driver Resource Center (IDRC): Mandatory 12 to 48 hours.
Intoxicated Driver Resource Center (IDRC) Fee: $230.
Alcohol Education and Rehabilitation Fund Fee: $100
Drunk Driving Fund: $100
Neighborhood Services Fund: $75
Surcharges: $1,000 per year for 3 years.
Ignition Interlock Device (IID): 6 months to 1 year after license is restored if BAC was 0.15% or over.

First offense DUI under 21 years old :

If you are under 21 years old and you drive with a BAC of anything over 0.01% you may face all of the fines and imprisonments times above and:

License suspension: 30 to 90 days.
Community service: 15 to 30 days.
Mandatory Alcohol and Highway Safety Education with IDRC.

If you are not licensed and under 17 years old at the time of the charges your license processing may take an additional 30 to 90 days.

Second offenses carry harsher imprisonment times as well as higher fines. Visit the New Jersey MVC website to learn more about DUI penalties.
The IDRC

The state has a resource center in every county for first and third offenders and three regional centers for second offenders. Each offender attends an alcohol and highway safety education program at a center and is evaluated for an alcohol or drug problem. If treatment is required then the offender must complete a minimum of 16 weeks in a program.

The offender also has an opportunity to supplement this treatment with attendance at a self-help group. The centers monitor compliance and report any noncompliance to the courts and to Motor Vehicle Commission. Failure to comply on the part of the offender results in further license suspension and a possible jail sentence as well.
The Ignition Interlock Device (IID)

DUI offenders will be required to have a ignition interlock device installed if you BAC was 0.15% or over and or this is not your first DUI. If this is not your first DUI then you may be required to have an IID in your vehicle while your license is suspended and then for 1 to 3 years after your license is restored.

In this situation, the driver must blow into the device, and the vehicle will not start if that person's blood alcohol content exceeds a certain level.

If you are required to have an interlock installed, you must present proof of installation in person at a Regional Service Center for restoration of your driving privilege.
Driver's License Reinstatement

Once your suspension period is over you will receive a Notice of Restoration from the MVC. The first step to restoring your license is to pay the $100 restoration fee. You can do this online, in person or by mail. Once you have paid your fee you will have to complete all the steps for a driver's license renewal and any other requirements on your Notice of Restoration.

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Together lets End Impaired Driving !!!

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Together lets End Impaired Driving !!!
Are there advantages to using a Designated Driver Service in Sharon
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West Belmar nj ?
The holidays are in full swing and if you are like me, then you have already cracked open your fair share of wine bottles.

While the holiday seasons brings out the merriest and brightest in most of us, it can also bring out the drunkest.

I'm not here to rain on your parade, or to take away that glass of wine, beer or festively peppermint cocktail, but I am here to remind you to get your sh*t together.

Most importantly, you need to make sure you are being seasonally safe.

Although, this is also a gentle reminder, this is something you should be doing year round.

As you go through the next few weeks making appearances at those high school get-togethers, college friend reunions, work parties, family dinners and nights on the town, please, do us all a favor and designate a driver.

Just in case you need convincing, here are some reasons why you should:
1. You can appoint a different designated driver each time you go out.

Each night when you are headed out, take a moment to poll your friends to see who would be willing to be the designated driver. Depending on the size of the group you go out with, you may be able to go a few weeks before anyone has to do repeat duty.

Let's be honest, everyone wants to know he or she is going to make it home safely. There is

There is usually at least one person who has sworn off of alcohol for a few days because of a brutal hangover.

If no one volunteers, then kick it off yourself. Taking the first evening will not only get it out of the way, but will start the trend off on a positive note. You can sit back, relax and watch the antics.

You can sit back, relax and watch the antics.
2. Having a designated driver will allow you to actually enjoy your spiked coco.

Sip that spiked coco worry-free, knowing that if you over indulge, it won't be a last-minute scramble to get a ride home.

You can even add a cup (or a few) of eggnog to the evening without wondering to yourself if you are really okay to drive.

Here's the answer: You're not. Don't make your friends fight you for your keys.
3. Santa does not deliver presents in jail.

I repeat: Santa does not deliver presents in jail. If you want to be ripping that wrapping paper off your gifts, then you need to be seated in your own living room, not sitting next to a bad Santa look-alike in a jail cell.

If you want to be ripping that wrapping paper off your gifts, then you need to be seated in your own living room, not sitting next to a bad Santa look-alike in a jail cell.

Plus, we would hate for you to only get coal on Christmas morning, so be good for goodness sake.
4. Sleeping in your own bed is always best (even if it's with someone).

Avoid the panic that comes with waking up in a foreign bed by making sure you are going to be back in your bed, even if it is with your Tinder date or ex (I see you, holiday season).

Take a moment to think about how comfy your bed is, how perfect the pillows are and how nice it is to not have to ask some random person for a ride home. You got this.

You got this.
5. There's no excuse not to use a Designated Driver.

Okay, you f*cked it right up and didn't appoint a designated driver like I told you to, but there's still no excuse for intoxicated driving.


It never breaks the bank and let's be honest, a DUI is a terrible Christmas gift.

Tired of being babysat?

I'm tired of babysitting you, so let's just agree that you will appoint a designated driver this season and keep yourself safe.

Enjoy the holiday season, your friends, family and presents.

Ho ho ho!

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Are there any advantages to using a Designated Driver in Oak Hill
Philips Mills
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Deal Park nj ?

Drinking is fun, but it comes at a cost. Drinks themselves are never cheap, but not being able to drive yourself around means also having to fork over fortunes to your uber or cab driver.

This is why everyone loves the DD. Who can do anything but praise the selfless friend who sacrifices their own fun for the greater good of the group? Shots of tequila are awesome, but nothing tops a free ride from the GTA to Early Mercy!

Here are 10 reasons you should skip drinking tonight but tag along as the designated driver:
1. You won't be hungover tomorrow.

You were able to have a night out without sacrificing the following day. You can wake up at 8am sharp and go to yoga without every ounce of your being begging you to stay in bed.
2. You'll feel like the smartest, most responsible friend (for once).

You'll get to feel like a brilliant, responsible prodigy amongst your amazing but idiotic friends just by speaking coherently.
3. They'll owe you big time.

You’re doing a massive favour for your friends, and now they’ll be indebted to you and potentially return the favour next time you feel like getting lit.
4. You'll save money.

And you'll still have fun just by being out! You won't have to pay for overpriced cabs, drinks, and necessary fast food to absorb the liquor.
5. You'll have the story scoop.

Who needs to watch a movie when your friends are this funny? Watching them be their crazy drunk selves is entertainment enough! You’ll observe and remember the most, and therefore you’ll be able to tell the most acute stories and playbacks of the night.
6. You'll be preventing potential drunk driving incidents.

Which will leave your conscience crystal clear. Being the designated driver means that you are preventing any of your friends from being a potential drunk driver, so when you're DD you can feel good about saving lives.
7. You'll reap the benefits of drunk generosity.

While there's no statistical info anywhere online, if I were to guess, I'd say that people are 400% more generous when they are drunk. You'll have to dodge free shots like mad, but I'm sure one of your grateful friends will cover your post-bar poutine.
8. You won't have any regrets.

You won’t have anything to wonder or be worried about. You KNOW you didn’t call your ex, you KNOW you didn't destroy any friendships, and you KNOW you told the cute guy who tried to buy you a drink about your stomach rash, but that one's on you.
9. You'll have tons of blackmail material.

Drunk people tend to love being photographed in ways that horrify their sober selves. Proceed with caution.
10. You'll get to end the night on your call.

The second you’re bored or your feet hurt, you’re ALL outta there. No waiting around - your car, your call !!!

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Are there any advantages to using a Designated Driver in Lafayette Mills
Millhurst
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North Middletown nj ?


This holiday season marks the “21st Birthday” of the U.S. Designated Driver Campaign, which was created by the Harvard School of Public Health’s Center for Health Communication in partnership with Hollywood’s creative community and leading TV networks. This milestone offers a good opportunity to look back at the campaign, and to analyze the reasons for its success.

Launched in late 1988, the campaign sought to demonstrate how a new social concept — the “designated driver” — could be rapidly diffused through American society via mass communication, importing the concept from Scandinavia and catalyzing a fundamental shift in social norms relating to driving-after-drinking. Such a shift was essential for curbing alcohol-related traffic fatalities, the leading cause of death among young adults aged 15-24 in the U.S. Through this initiative, the Harvard School of Public Health became the architect of the “U.S. Designated Driver Campaign”. All major Hollywood studios participated along with the ABC, CBS, and NBC television networks.

The project broke new ground when TV writers agreed to insert drunken driving prevention messages, including frequent references to designated drivers, into scripts of top-rated television programs, such as “Cheers,” “L.A. Law,” and “The Cosby Show.” Entertainment not only mirrors social reality, but also helps shape it by depicting what constitutes popular opinion, by influencing people’s perceptions of the roles and behaviors that are appropriate to members of a culture, and by modeling specific behaviors. The strength of this approach is that short messages, embedded within dialogue, are casually presented by characters who serve as role models within a dramatic context, facilitating social learning. The project’s strategy was endorsed in a unanimous resolution of the board of directors of the Writers Guild of America, West. Over a four-year period, more than 160 prime-time programs incorporated sub-plots, scenes, and dialogue on the subject, including frequent references to the use of designated drivers.

At Harvard’s request, ABC, CBS, and NBC also aired frequent public service announcements (PSAs) during prime time encouraging the use of designated drivers. This was the first time that the three networks produced and sponsored simultaneous campaigns with the same message. Harvard’s public relations activities further reinforced the campaign, generating extensive news coverage. According to industry estimates, the campaign received over $100 million each year in network air time.

The campaign soon became transformed into a national movement as a broad range of prominent individuals (e.g., President George Bush, President Bill Clinton, Surgeon General C. Everett Koop); government agencies (e.g., the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the federal Center for Substance Abuse Prevention); national organizations and advocacy groups (e.g., Mothers Against Drunk Driving); professional sports leagues (e.g., Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association); major corporations (e.g., State Farm Insurance); leading police departments; and brewers and distillers endorsed and promoted the designated driver concept.

“Designated driver” became a household phrase in the U.S. to such an extent that the term appeared in the 1991 Random House Webster’s College Dictionary. Public opinion polls documented the rapid, wide acceptance and strong popularity of the designated driver concept. According to the Roper Poll, the proportion of Americans serving as a designated driver reached 37% in 1991. Among Americans under the age of 30, 52% had actually been a designated driver. Among frequent drinkers, 54% had been driven home by a designated driver. By 1998, according to the Roper Poll, a majority of adults who drink had served as a designated driver and/or been driven home by one. Among frequent drinkers who consumed five or more drinks in the past seven days, 62% had served as a designated driver and/or been driven home by one.

When the campaign began in late 1988, annual alcohol-related traffic fatalities stood at 23,626. By 1994, fatalities had declined by 30%. A variety of factors were responsible for this striking progress, including intensive publicity, new laws, and strict enforcement.

Why did the Designated Driver campaign succeed?

The campaign’s message was narrowly focused, highly specific, and easily communicated. We did not attempt to take on the entirety of alcohol use and abuse in American society. Rather, we took a highly complex problem, broke it down into separate, manageable components, and selected one component where there seemed to be a meaningful opportunity to achieve change at the time.

The campaign’s message called for only a modest shift in behavior. The message was not anti-alcohol. It said, “If you drink, take your turn as the Designated Driver.”

Instead of a negative message (“Don’t drink and drive”), the campaign promoted a positive, empowering message (“The Designated Driver is the Life of the Party.”)

There was a broad social consensus about the need to address the problem of drunken driving, and there were no economic interests opposing the campaign; the alcoholic beverage industry gets a black eye from drunken driving, so they supported the effort.

The timing was right. Mothers Against Drunken Driving (MADD) had spent eight years building a foundation of public understanding, concern, and support. So, the general public was primed and ready to respond. On the other hand, media attention to the problem had declined sharply by 1988 and there was a need for a fresh, new idea to rejuvenate the anti-drunken driving movement.

It was a relatively easy step for the Hollywood creative community to support the campaign. Writers were already depicting alcohol use, so it didn’t take much heavy lifting to insert a reference to driving in connection with drinking. The Designated Driver message could be incorporated with a line or two of dialogue, and did not require major changes in character development or the story line.

The issue of drunken driving hit close to home for many members of the Hollywood community whose teenage children were potentially at risk. And, for many others in the creative community, alcoholism had touched the lives of a family member or friend; they were eager to help address any aspect of alcohol abuse. The issue had personal relevance for them.

The campaign had the strong, sustained support of a leading member of the Hollywood community—Grant Tinker, former chairman of NBC and a prominent TV producer—who was held in enormously high regard by his peers. The campaign assembled an Advisory Board of key individuals in the Hollywood community, who were recruited with Grant Tinker’s leadership, to provide ready access to a broad array of directors, writers, producers, and actors who could help the campaign. The campaign also won formal endorsements from the boards of the Writers Guild and the Screen Actors Guild.

The campaign did not rely on the intermediary of a public relations agency, which might have diminished the effort’s credibility. Harvard staff spent 25 work weeks in Hollywood meeting individually with 250 key people in the Hollywood community. The campaign asked for Hollywood’s support, but didn’t demand it, and was deeply respectful of the community’s core value of creative freedom.
Together lets End Impaired Driving !!!
To capture and sustain the attention and interest of the creative community, the campaign employed a dozen different tactics to follow-up after face-to-face meetings. Without a steady drumbeat of messaging directed at Hollywood, the odds were low that supportive members of the creative community would remember to act on their stated intentions.

Notwithstanding the progress achieved to date, some 13,000 people will lose their lives this year in an alcohol-related crash. So, if you plan to drink on New Year’s Eve, make sure you choose a Designated Driver who doesn’t drink at all. And, don’t be shy about intervening to stop a friend or relative from driving after drinking. You could save a life.

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Are there any advantages to using a Designated Driver in West Keansburg
Waterwitch
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Together lets End Impaired Driving !!!
Are there any advantages to using a Designated Driver in Shrewsbury Borough
Shrewsbury Township
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Together lets End Impaired Driving !!!
Are there any advantages to using a Designated Driver in Monmouth County
Aberdeen
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Farmingdale nj ?

What are the ingredients for success in pro-social media campaigns?

This holiday season marks the “28th Birthday” of the U.S. Designated Driver Campaign, which was created by the Harvard School of Public Health’s Center for Health Communication in partnership with Hollywood’s creative community and leading TV networks. This milestone offers a good opportunity to look back at the campaign, and to analyze the reasons for its success.

Launched in late 1988, the campaign sought to demonstrate how a new social concept — the “designated driver” — could be rapidly diffused through American society via mass communication, importing the concept from Scandinavia and catalyzing a fundamental shift in social norms relating to driving-after-drinking. Such a shift was essential for curbing alcohol-related traffic fatalities, the leading cause of death among young adults aged 15-24 in the U.S. Through this initiative, the Harvard School of Public Health became the architect of the “U.S. Designated Driver Campaign”. All major Hollywood studios participated along with the ABC, CBS, and NBC television networks.

The project broke new ground when TV writers agreed to insert drunken driving prevention messages, including frequent references to designated drivers, into scripts of top-rated television programs, such as “Cheers,” “L.A. Law,” and “The Cosby Show.” Entertainment not only mirrors social reality, but also helps shape it by depicting what constitutes popular opinion, by influencing people’s perceptions of the roles and behaviors that are appropriate to members of a culture, and by modeling specific behaviors. The strength of this approach is that short messages, embedded within dialogue, are casually presented by characters who serve as role models within a dramatic context, facilitating social learning. The project’s strategy was endorsed in a unanimous resolution of the board of directors of the Writers Guild of America, West. Over a four-year period, more than 160 prime-time programs incorporated sub-plots, scenes, and dialogue on the subject, including frequent references to the use of designated drivers.

At Harvard’s request, ABC, CBS, and NBC also aired frequent public service announcements (PSAs) during prime time encouraging the use of designated drivers. This was the first time that the three networks produced and sponsored simultaneous campaigns with the same message. Harvard’s public relations activities further reinforced the campaign, generating extensive news coverage. According to industry estimates, the campaign received over $100 million each year in network air time.

The campaign soon became transformed into a national movement as a broad range of prominent individuals (e.g., President George Bush, President Bill Clinton, Surgeon General C. Everett Koop); government agencies (e.g., the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the federal Center for Substance Abuse Prevention); national organizations and advocacy groups (e.g., Mothers Against Drunk Driving); professional sports leagues (e.g., Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association); major corporations (e.g., State Farm Insurance); leading police departments; and brewers and distillers endorsed and promoted the designated driver concept.

“Designated driver” became a household phrase in the U.S. to such an extent that the term appeared in the 1991 Random House Webster’s College Dictionary. Public opinion polls documented the rapid, wide acceptance and strong popularity of the designated driver concept. According to the Roper Poll, the proportion of Americans serving as a designated driver reached 37% in 1991. Among Americans under the age of 30, 52% had actually been a designated driver. Among frequent drinkers, 54% had been driven home by a designated driver. By 1998, according to the Roper Poll, a majority of adults who drink had served as a designated driver and/or been driven home by one. Among frequent drinkers who consumed five or more drinks in the past seven days, 62% had served as a designated driver and/or been driven home by one.

When the campaign began in late 1988, annual alcohol-related traffic fatalities stood at 23,626. By 1994, fatalities had declined by 30%. A variety of factors were responsible for this striking progress, including intensive publicity, new laws, and strict enforcement.

Why did the Designated Driver campaign succeed?

The campaign’s message was narrowly focused, highly specific, and easily communicated. We did not attempt to take on the entirety of alcohol use and abuse in American society. Rather, we took a highly complex problem, broke it down into separate, manageable components, and selected one component where there seemed to be a meaningful opportunity to achieve change at the time.

The campaign’s message called for only a modest shift in behavior. The message was not anti-alcohol. It said, “If you drink, take your turn as the Designated Driver.”

Instead of a negative message (“Don’t drink and drive”), the campaign promoted a positive, empowering message (“The Designated Driver is the Life of the Party.”)

There was a broad social consensus about the need to address the problem of drunken driving, and there were no economic interests opposing the campaign; the alcoholic beverage industry gets a black eye from drunken driving, so they supported the effort.

The timing was right. Mothers Against Drunken Driving (MADD) had spent eight years building a foundation of public understanding, concern, and support. So, the general public was primed and ready to respond. On the other hand, media attention to the problem had declined sharply by 1988 and there was a need for a fresh, new idea to rejuvenate the anti-drunken driving movement.

It was a relatively easy step for the Hollywood creative community to support the campaign. Writers were already depicting alcohol use, so it didn’t take much heavy lifting to insert a reference to driving in connection with drinking. The Designated Driver message could be incorporated with a line or two of dialogue, and did not require major changes in character development or the story line.

The issue of drunken driving hit close to home for many members of the Hollywood community whose teenage children were potentially at risk. And, for many others in the creative community, alcoholism had touched the lives of a family member or friend; they were eager to help address any aspect of alcohol abuse. The issue had personal relevance for them.

The campaign had the strong, sustained support of a leading member of the Hollywood community—Grant Tinker, former chairman of NBC and a prominent TV producer—who was held in enormously high regard by his peers. The campaign assembled an Advisory Board of key individuals in the Hollywood community, who were recruited with Grant Tinker’s leadership, to provide ready access to a broad array of directors, writers, producers, and actors who could help the campaign. The campaign also won formal endorsements from the boards of the Writers Guild and the Screen Actors Guild.

The campaign did not rely on the intermediary of a public relations agency, which might have diminished the effort’s credibility. Harvard staff spent 25 work weeks in Hollywood meeting individually with 250 key people in the Hollywood community. The campaign asked for Hollywood’s support, but didn’t demand it, and was deeply respectful of the community’s core value of creative freedom.

To capture and sustain the attention and interest of the creative community, the campaign employed a dozen different tactics to follow-up after face-to-face meetings. Without a steady drumbeat of messaging directed at Hollywood, the odds were low that supportive members of the creative community would remember to act on their stated intentions.

Notwithstanding the progress achieved to date, some 13,000 people will lose their lives this year in an alcohol-related crash. So, if you plan to drink on New Year’s Eve, make sure you choose a Designated Driver who doesn’t drink at all. And, don’t be shy about intervening to stop a friend or relative from driving after drinking. You could save a life.
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