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Mark Gardener
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Ecologist, Lecturer and Writer. Providing teaching and training in: Ecology, statistics, data analysis, and R: the statistical programming language
Ecologist, Lecturer and Writer. Providing teaching and training in: Ecology, statistics, data analysis, and R: the statistical programming language

264 followers
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Adding a bit extra to a histogram...
Add more to a histogram
Add more to a histogram
dataanalyticsorguk.wordpress.com
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Fieldwork alive and well #Fieldwork #Ecology
Environmental Science SXF206 combo 2017
Environmental Science SXF206 combo 2017
gardenersown.wordpress.com
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If you have column names as numbers R will prepend "X" to the column names
http://bit.ly/25WCV25

Change this using check.names = FALSE in the read.xxx() command when you import the data to #R #Stats
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An interesting environmental solution to a potential problem #soil   #carbon   #farming   #ecology  
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A few notes about way to present the results of matched pairs stats tests graphically using #R or #Excel:
http://dataanalytics.org.uk/Publications/Writers%20Bloc/Matched%20Graphs.htm
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Using the expression() command in #R  to make complicated strings such as math formulae or superscript for axis labels etc.
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Some notes about legends in #R  plots. There's a section on placing the legend in the plot margin.

A legend is a tool to help explain a graph. You are most commonly going to want to add one to a bar chart where you have several data series. You'll also want to add one to a line or scatter plot when you have more than one series. Essentially you use a legend to help make a complicated plot more understandable.

In R you can add a legend to any plot using the legend() command. You can also use the legend = TRUE parameter in the barplot() command. The barplot() command is the only general plot type that has a legend parameter (the others need a separate legend).

The legend() command has a host of parameters, which can be tweaked to produce the finished article. Generally the most difficult part is making room on the chart for the legend itself!
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Using colour in graphs:
http://www.dataanalytics.org.uk/Publications/Writers%20Bloc/ColourInCharts.htm

I'm working on a new edition of my book Statistics for Ecologists Using R and Excel and thought I'd add a few notes to the website...

Controlling and managing the colours you display is an importnat element in presenting your work. With an increasing volume of work being presented via the Internet, colour is something not to take for granted. Using default colours is "easy" but for maximum impact you should think carefully about how to present the best colours for the job.
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I am working on a new edition of my book "Statistics for Ecologists", here are some thoughts on gridlines on graphs.
http://www.dataanalytics.org.uk/Publications/Writers%20Bloc/Gridlines.htm 

Including:
How to make gridlines visible on #excel  charts through the bars.
How to make gridlines on #R  plots hidden behind the bars.
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