Living Photography

Plants don’t always seem particularly charismatic, but hidden from us in their slow-motion and chemical activities are incredible mechanisms that sense and respond to the world around them. Plants move in response to light, bending and stretching to get maximum sunlight. This phototropism extends all the way down to much smaller photosynthetic organisms. Like other bacteria, many species of photosynthetic cyanobacteria can swim and swarm to move towards areas where more food–sunlight–is available.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/oscillator/2012/05/12/living-photography/

This article from Scientific American demonstrates how these properties can be used to make incredible works of living art.

On a related note, a recent BBC documentary "How to Grow a Planet" featured some absolutely stunning footage of cholorplasts responding to light; http://youtu.be/JX_Wo0xSfcg?t=18m53s

The entire documentary is worth a watch and deals with the evolution of plant life and how they set the stage for more complex life by altering our atmosphere and pumping it full of oxygen. A journey through time from when our planet was nothing but a barren rock, to early plant life, the ferns in giant insect infested jungles and ultimately to the massive trees of forests roamed by dinosaurs in the Jurassic age.


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