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Mikal De Valia
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natural born surrealist
natural born surrealist

210 followers
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...Razer faced blowback when it launched a cryptocurrency mining application called Cortex, where users would be rewarded with its Silver funny money.

"The new app to put snoozing machines to work, solving blockchain puzzles in the background in exchange for sweet, sweet Silver," Razer said at the time.

Enter Tavis Ormandy, security researcher for Google Project Zero and scourge of buggy software makers, who took a look at the software and was stunned.

"Holy moly, I just installed this. WHY IS CEF (chromium embedded) REMOTE DEBUGGING ENABLED AND LISTENING BY DEFAULT (!?!?!?!)," Ormandy tweeted.

"I don't have any razer hardware to test, but they probably (like, right now) need to fix that."

To Razer's credit, the company fixed the issue within 24 hours; on the other hand, it allowed remote command execution in the first place.
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It is with heavy hearts that we are announcing the end of Maximum Rocknroll as a monthly print fanzine. There will be three more issues of the fanzine in its current format; later in 2019 we will begin publishing record reviews online alongside our weekly radio show. Readers can look forward to more online content, updates regarding the archive project initiated in 2016, and other yet-to-be-announced MRR projects, as well as new ways for punks around the world to get involved. We will be having a public meeting at 2:00pm on Sunday, January 20 at the MRR compound to discuss the future — please write mrr@maximumrocknroll.com for details.

Maximum Rocknroll began as a radio show in 1977. For the founders of Maximum Rocknroll, the driving impulse behind the radio show was simple: an unabashed, uncompromising love of punk rock. In 1982, buoyed by burgeoning DIY punk and hardcore scenes all over the world, the founders of the show — Tim Yohannan & the gang — launched Maximum Rocknroll as a print fanzine. That first issue drew a line in the sand between the so-called punks who mimicked society’s worst attributes — the “apolitical, anti-historical, and anti-intellectual,” the ignorant, racist, and violent — and MRR’s principled dedication to promoting a true alternative to the doldrums of the mainstream. That dedication included anti-corporate ideals, avowedly leftist politics, and relentless enthusiasm for DIY punk and hardcore bands and scenes from every inhabited continent of the globe. Over the next several decades, what started as a do-it-yourself labor of love among a handful of friends and fellow travelers has extended to include literally thousands of volunteers and hundreds of thousands of readers. Today, forty-two years after that first radio show, there have been well over 1600 episodes of MRR radio and 400 issues of Maximum Rocknroll fanzine — not to mention some show spaces, record stores, and distros started along the way — all capturing the mood and sound of international DIY punk rock: wild, ebullient, irreverent, and oppositional.

Needless to say, the landscape of the punk underground has shifted over the years, as has the world of print media. Many of the names and faces behind Maximum Rocknroll have changed too. Yet with every such shift, MRR has continued to remind readers that punk rock isn’t any one person, one band, or even one fanzine. It is an idea, an ethos, a fuck you to the status quo, a belief that a different kind of world and a different kind of sound is ours for the making.

These changes do not mean that Maximum Rocknroll is coming to an end. We are still the place to turn if you care about Swedish girl bands or Brazilian thrash or Italian anarchist publications or Filipino teenagers making anti-state pogo punk, if you are interested in media made by punks for punks, if you still believe in the power and potential of autonomously produced and underground culture. We certainly still do, and look forward to the surprises, challenges, and joys that this next chapter will bring. Long live Maximum Rocknroll.

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It is with heavy hearts that we are announcing the end of Maximum Rocknroll as a monthly print fanzine. There will be three more issues of the fanzine in its current format; later in 2019 we will begin publishing record reviews online alongside our weekly radio show. Readers can look forward to more online content, updates regarding the archive project initiated in 2016, and other yet-to-be-announced MRR projects, as well as new ways for punks around the world to get involved. We will be having a public meeting at 2:00pm on Sunday, January 20 at the MRR compound to discuss the future — please write mrr@maximumrocknroll.com for details.

Maximum Rocknroll began as a radio show in 1977. For the founders of Maximum Rocknroll, the driving impulse behind the radio show was simple: an unabashed, uncompromising love of punk rock. In 1982, buoyed by burgeoning DIY punk and hardcore scenes all over the world, the founders of the show — Tim Yohannan & the gang — launched Maximum Rocknroll as a print fanzine. That first issue drew a line in the sand between the so-called punks who mimicked society’s worst attributes — the “apolitical, anti-historical, and anti-intellectual,” the ignorant, racist, and violent — and MRR’s principled dedication to promoting a true alternative to the doldrums of the mainstream. That dedication included anti-corporate ideals, avowedly leftist politics, and relentless enthusiasm for DIY punk and hardcore bands and scenes from every inhabited continent of the globe. Over the next several decades, what started as a do-it-yourself labor of love among a handful of friends and fellow travelers has extended to include literally thousands of volunteers and hundreds of thousands of readers. Today, forty-two years after that first radio show, there have been well over 1600 episodes of MRR radio and 400 issues of Maximum Rocknroll fanzine — not to mention some show spaces, record stores, and distros started along the way — all capturing the mood and sound of international DIY punk rock: wild, ebullient, irreverent, and oppositional.

Needless to say, the landscape of the punk underground has shifted over the years, as has the world of print media. Many of the names and faces behind Maximum Rocknroll have changed too. Yet with every such shift, MRR has continued to remind readers that punk rock isn’t any one person, one band, or even one fanzine. It is an idea, an ethos, a fuck you to the status quo, a belief that a different kind of world and a different kind of sound is ours for the making.

These changes do not mean that Maximum Rocknroll is coming to an end. We are still the place to turn if you care about Swedish girl bands or Brazilian thrash or Italian anarchist publications or Filipino teenagers making anti-state pogo punk, if you are interested in media made by punks for punks, if you still believe in the power and potential of autonomously produced and underground culture. We certainly still do, and look forward to the surprises, challenges, and joys that this next chapter will bring. Long live Maximum Rocknroll.

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It is with heavy hearts that we are announcing the end of Maximum Rocknroll as a monthly print fanzine. There will be three more issues of the fanzine in its current format; later in 2019 we will begin publishing record reviews online alongside our weekly radio show. Readers can look forward to more online content, updates regarding the archive project initiated in 2016, and other yet-to-be-announced MRR projects, as well as new ways for punks around the world to get involved. We will be having a public meeting at 2:00pm on Sunday, January 20 at the MRR compound to discuss the future — please write mrr@maximumrocknroll.com for details.

Maximum Rocknroll began as a radio show in 1977. For the founders of Maximum Rocknroll, the driving impulse behind the radio show was simple: an unabashed, uncompromising love of punk rock. In 1982, buoyed by burgeoning DIY punk and hardcore scenes all over the world, the founders of the show — Tim Yohannan & the gang — launched Maximum Rocknroll as a print fanzine. That first issue drew a line in the sand between the so-called punks who mimicked society’s worst attributes — the “apolitical, anti-historical, and anti-intellectual,” the ignorant, racist, and violent — and MRR’s principled dedication to promoting a true alternative to the doldrums of the mainstream. That dedication included anti-corporate ideals, avowedly leftist politics, and relentless enthusiasm for DIY punk and hardcore bands and scenes from every inhabited continent of the globe. Over the next several decades, what started as a do-it-yourself labor of love among a handful of friends and fellow travelers has extended to include literally thousands of volunteers and hundreds of thousands of readers. Today, forty-two years after that first radio show, there have been well over 1600 episodes of MRR radio and 400 issues of Maximum Rocknroll fanzine — not to mention some show spaces, record stores, and distros started along the way — all capturing the mood and sound of international DIY punk rock: wild, ebullient, irreverent, and oppositional.

Needless to say, the landscape of the punk underground has shifted over the years, as has the world of print media. Many of the names and faces behind Maximum Rocknroll have changed too. Yet with every such shift, MRR has continued to remind readers that punk rock isn’t any one person, one band, or even one fanzine. It is an idea, an ethos, a fuck you to the status quo, a belief that a different kind of world and a different kind of sound is ours for the making.

These changes do not mean that Maximum Rocknroll is coming to an end. We are still the place to turn if you care about Swedish girl bands or Brazilian thrash or Italian anarchist publications or Filipino teenagers making anti-state pogo punk, if you are interested in media made by punks for punks, if you still believe in the power and potential of autonomously produced and underground culture. We certainly still do, and look forward to the surprises, challenges, and joys that this next chapter will bring. Long live Maximum Rocknroll.

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#cybersurrealism
#gentrification
#dada
#anarchism
#resistance



To the brave, faceless militants of South Central regarding the Dalton Warehouse offensive

Two weeks ago when 356 S. Mission Rd., Gavin Brown Enterprises, Laura Owens, and Ooga Booga formally announced their departure from Boyle Heights, we vigorously declared 2018 as “the year of escalation and transformation. More and more galleries will feel this proclamation. More and more galleries will close their doors. This is an undeniable fact. But we will not rest on this inevitability.”

Defend Boyle Heights formally recognizes and congratulates the faceless, tactical militants who initiated the offensive on the Dalton Warehouse space. We join the chorus on social media social media and the streets who thanked these militants for fighting for their community. The people understand that the livelihood of working class, immigrant, undocumented, black and brown communities matter more than the Dalton Warehouse hipster’s right to offer another session of half-baked art made by artists who think their whitewalls matter more than black, brown, and working class lives. The people also understand the role that hipster amenities like arts initiatives play in gentrification: Art spaces move in, rents go up, tenants and local businesses are evicted, and capital washes away the barrio”. These conversations have been had, so why do the Dalton hipsters continue pretending to be ignorant of their role in gentrifying South Central?

We lastly offer, in good faith, a critique to the militants: a strategic offense against gentrifying amenities are necessary, but they must be premised on building autonomous power for the people. What is the follow up? Where does South Central turn next in order to build the disciplined, militant army of anti-gentrification fighters that it needs? Such a premise must exist if we wish to sustain our resistance against gentrification in Los Angeles. Nonetheless, we faithfully urge more people to heed the call to Defend Boyle Heights, Defend South Central and beyond.

For these reasons we assert: Dalton Warehouse, you are not ready for the wrath of the community of South Central. This is the year of escalation. The new anti-gentrification activists are bolder, disciplined and more militant. It seems it would be safer for the Warehouse to do what 356 S. Mission Rd., PSSST, and other galleries like UTA are doing: pick up your shit and get the fuck out of our neighborhoods.
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#cybersurrealism
#gentrification
#dada
#anarchism
#resistance



To the brave, faceless militants of South Central regarding the Dalton Warehouse offensive

Two weeks ago when 356 S. Mission Rd., Gavin Brown Enterprises, Laura Owens, and Ooga Booga formally announced their departure from Boyle Heights, we vigorously declared 2018 as “the year of escalation and transformation. More and more galleries will feel this proclamation. More and more galleries will close their doors. This is an undeniable fact. But we will not rest on this inevitability.”

Defend Boyle Heights formally recognizes and congratulates the faceless, tactical militants who initiated the offensive on the Dalton Warehouse space. We join the chorus on social media social media and the streets who thanked these militants for fighting for their community. The people understand that the livelihood of working class, immigrant, undocumented, black and brown communities matter more than the Dalton Warehouse hipster’s right to offer another session of half-baked art made by artists who think their whitewalls matter more than black, brown, and working class lives. The people also understand the role that hipster amenities like arts initiatives play in gentrification: Art spaces move in, rents go up, tenants and local businesses are evicted, and capital washes away the barrio”. These conversations have been had, so why do the Dalton hipsters continue pretending to be ignorant of their role in gentrifying South Central?

We lastly offer, in good faith, a critique to the militants: a strategic offense against gentrifying amenities are necessary, but they must be premised on building autonomous power for the people. What is the follow up? Where does South Central turn next in order to build the disciplined, militant army of anti-gentrification fighters that it needs? Such a premise must exist if we wish to sustain our resistance against gentrification in Los Angeles. Nonetheless, we faithfully urge more people to heed the call to Defend Boyle Heights, Defend South Central and beyond.

For these reasons we assert: Dalton Warehouse, you are not ready for the wrath of the community of South Central. This is the year of escalation. The new anti-gentrification activists are bolder, disciplined and more militant. It seems it would be safer for the Warehouse to do what 356 S. Mission Rd., PSSST, and other galleries like UTA are doing: pick up your shit and get the fuck out of our neighborhoods.
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Poemario A ESA ROSA NACIDA DEL DESAMOR...
5. ALMA BLANCA REFLEJO DE CIELO

Sirvió el señor la "serviola" con ajo y pimientos
y en mi pensamiento se escanció tu amor
y susurrando al viento contra las chismosas olas
en la quilla de una barca las escamas irisadas
de multiforme color se expandieron en el blanco
De un cuerpo etéreo que sólo tú y yo sabíamos
era la esencia de nuestro amor.

Y grito tu nombre al mar que me devuelva
tu risa fresca y cristalina, susurrantes las olas
te acaricien dulcemente y musitando en el eco
por tí celebren en su rebelde e inquieta espuma
la eterna canción de amor.
El sol, tras la estela de la Luna, zigzagueando
verde y plata, firmamento contra firmamento
en los recodos de tu calma el alma blanca
beso De cielo tu boca avive tras la gruta
cubierta por un velo.

Juntáronse dos almas de un querer
a otro querer, pensamientos de distancia,
espacio y tiempo en hoy mañana y ayer.
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