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Komunitas Psikologi UI
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Tempat bagi keluarga besar Fakultas Psikologi Universitas Indonesia :)
Tempat bagi keluarga besar Fakultas Psikologi Universitas Indonesia :)

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SPECIAL SECTION ANNOUNCEMENT—Check out the latest issue of Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology for a special section “Ethics in Operational Psychology,” a contribution to the discussion on psychologists’ role in  #nationalsecurity . In the section’s lead article, “Psychology Under Fire: Adversarial Operational Psychology and Psychological Ethics,” authors Jean Maria Arrigo, Roy Eidelson, and Ray Bennett distinguish between two kinds of operational psychology—adversarial  #operationalpsychology (AOP) and collaborative operational psychology (COP). They offer a three-factor framework for differentiating the two and assert that AOP “is largely unsupported by the American Psychological Association Ethics Code, that its potential benefits are exceeded by the likelihood of irreversible harms, and that its  #military necessity is undemonstrated.” Two commentaries by military intelligence professionals, Lawrence Rockwood and Steven Kleinman, follow. See http://on.apa.org/X4IFGB.
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Scientists Show How a Gene Duplication Helped Our Brains Become 'Human' http://goo.gl/ZBg1S

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has shown that an extra copy of a brain-development gene, which appeared in our ancestors' genomes about 2.4 million years ago, allowed maturing neurons to migrate farther and develop more connections.

What genetic changes account for the vast behavioral differences between humans and other primates? Researchers so far have catalogued only a few, but now it seems that they can add a big one to the list. A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has shown that an extra copy of a brain-development gene, which appeared in our ancestors' genomes about 2.4 million years ago, allowed maturing neurons to migrate farther and develop more connections.

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Just for fun :)
Looks about right to me, but not sure of the scientific credentials of this illustration.
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