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John Nash (Kubulai)
Works at API
Attended Purdue University
Lived in Fort Wayne, IN USA
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John Nash (Kubulai)

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John Nash (Kubulai)

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Why would the National Weather Service need to purchase large quantities of powerful ammo? That’s the question many are asking after the federal agency followed in the footsteps of the Department of Homeland Security in putting out a solicitation for 46,000 rounds of hollow point bullets. Read developing story at Infowars... RELATED STORY: 'HOMELAND SECURITY' BUYING 450 MILLION HOLLOWPOINT BULLETS...
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Seriously, folks, for a national agency, 46,000 rounds is not much. That's only 1,000 rounds per employee if they employ only 46 people. I could enjoy 46,000 rounds of .40 S&W at home if someone wanted to buy it for me. 
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John Nash (Kubulai)

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Democrats: professing to be wise" they became fools!! Romans 1:22
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Truth.
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John Nash (Kubulai)

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Bravo
 
Deep History
Human beings are remarkably different than any other animal that has ever walked or crawled or burrowed or swam or flew over the earth. Yet humans remain animals — mere animals — a fact that, curiously, we humans often ignore or attempt to deny. A long, long history stretches behind this abnegation; a history which we, collectively, are merely beginning to explore or make explicit. Our many warring civilizations were constructed upon not only the bronze and iron of minerals tempered by fire and invention, but assume the form of our fears and prejudices woven into the stories and rituals we tell each other about ourselves and about our achievements.

One of the decisive differentiating factors that distinguish Homo sapiens from our innumerable earthbound cousins and ancestors branching out from the Great Tree of Life, stems from the fact that we are the only organism that tells and understands stories. This distinctive capability is made possible, obviously, by the flexibility of our uniquely pliable tongues and precisely positioned vocal chords along the trachea; this in turn makes articulated speech possible; a fact which predicates the formation of symbolic language and the attendant art of reasoning. Yet all these enabling, distinguishing factors stand upon an additional crucial fact: humans alone, amongst all living beings, harbor within themselves a deep sense of time. Hidden inside the secluded recesses of an individual human mind, dwells an imagined world reaching backward into the unchangeable past, while stretching forward towards a yet to be realized future.

Only humans are aware of their own mortality.

No other animal seems capable of anticipating — much less becoming terrified at — its inevitable impending demise.

Denial of Death
Today completes the sixtieth year of my life, imparting with it the gift of a more keen awareness of the Reaper's final approach towards me. My own death appears worse to me than a tragedy: death violates my sense of justice — setting to ruin an entire lifetime of painfully-earned experience; a lifetime of learning, of suffering, of acquiring wisdom. Gone. Lost. What has been stolen is incalculable. Yet, even in the midst of death's prideful desecration, the human spirit rises in resolute defiance: by reifying and recording the effervescent fleeting fancies secreted in the theatre of my own private imagination, through art I will offer my widow's mite to civilization. By creating a work that perdures against the ravaging decay of time, I endeavor to encapsulate, preserve, and thereby pass along my very essence as a legacy for the inheritance of posterity.

Death be not proud. For I intend to deprive you the fruit of your inglorious pyrrhic victory. I will consume my remaining days translating the fabric of the lightshow cascading across my synapses into the warp and weave of English idiom so that it may become accessible to others long after my remains have been committed to the flames and reduced to dust.

I will use two Collections on Google+ as a laboratory and proving ground to channel the untidy unruly uprising of ideas that invade my consciousness into some kind of meaningful order capable of — indeed worthy of — apprehension by you and by all posterity. I implore your patience even as I beg your assistance. I need be told when I am being unclear, when I've overlooked something, or when what I have written is wrong. (I am in possession of no privileged access to truth or to wisdom; it is inevitable that oft I will be mistaken.) The sole thing I insist upon is that when you are correcting me you extend the courtesy to explain why and how I am mistaken. For how can I amend my errant words if you withhold your wisdom from me?

Alongside "The Human Animal" collection, I will also be compiling another collection titled "The Future, Unending." These two collections are intimately linked. Indeed they are not two but both sides of one single project: a project I hope will culminate in the publication of a finished book (or books). The former collection considers what kind of being we are and how we come to know ourselves and our world; in philosopher jargon: Ontology and Epistemology. The latter collection expresses my perhaps Quixotic aspiration to reframe Ethics from its traditional normative regime of oughts and musts to a more adaptive formulation of responses to challenges; an understanding of ethics that I believe is not only more practical but more respectful of individual freedom, creativity, and uniqueness.

I fancy these two projects reflect each other like separate strands of the DNA molecule. Each strand contains identical information, albeit in mirrored form. To advance the analogy further, before the strands can be unzipped to be transcribed or to replicate, they first must be unravelled and untangled. This untangling is precisely what I hope to accomplish with your assistance here on Google+, .

The Gathering Storm
Precious little I have to say is new. The Zeitgeist of our moment is already burdened under the apocalyptic notion that civilization has crossed an ecological Rubicon; the prevailing institutions of today are ill-prepared, ill-equipped and mostly unresponsive to the crisis we, together, have induced; that our only home for the foreseeable future, the earth, cries out in heartwrenching anguish over the horrific violence our species has so callously inflicted upon her; that a catastrophe of unprecedented proportion will likely provide the only spur that will prompt us change our ways.

Yet despite this, indeed because of this, we hold good reason to remain hopeful. Amongst the many attributes that distinguish the human animal from every other living being is our ability to change and adapt. The human brain continuously reorganizes its axons and dendrites, speeding up the rate of evolution from eons to, literally, days. We can adjust. History promises we will.

Precious little I have to say is new. But whatever I do say that is actually new is, indeed, incalculably precious. I trust that this exercise I am initiating will prove more than an expression of my narcissistic delusions of grandeur. Yes, my words are my "selfie." But I will go out of my way to avoid burdening you with rubbish, even if much of what I write is destined to excision under the slash of an editor's red pencil. Even in that case, those words, lined up in a soldierly array, will have marched dutifully towards a better, more accurate expression of what I am actually striving to make explicit.

I thank you for joining me thus far along my nascent journey. I invite you to continue and accompany me. I will listen attentively to what you have to say. In conclusion I want to share a quote from Franz Kafka: 

... a book should be wielded like a pickaxe to shatter the frozen sea within the readers mind. If the book in our hands does not wake us, as with a fist that hammers on the skull, then it just isn't worth reading.

I intend to present to you and to posterity a book worth reading.

#writing   #collaboration   #googleplus  
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John Nash (Kubulai)

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Both idealized mythical stories that can not work in reality. Great ideals, but not functional in their pure form.
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Well, we've seen Socialism in all its glory and it more closely resembles the top pic. Besides, Socialists often say, "why waste all that money out there when we can spend it to fix the world's issues." 

Also, Star Trek is not Socialist, though the military does a pretty good job of taking care of its own. :)
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Clearly spoken.
One of the many great comics you can read for free at GoComics.com! Follow us for giveaways & giggles.
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Oh the travesty... 
Seven people were killed this morning when a Confederate flag walked into an Alabama shopping mall and started shooting. According to local reports, the flag entered Cherrywood Mall outside Huntsville armed with two AK-47 assault rifles, a P 228 handgun and several grenades. It immediately pr
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changing people's minds and thought process is so much harder.  Tolerance and respect are the key areas that have to be taught in the home and in education..  Have you practiced tolerance and respect today?
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Have him in circles
12,197 people
Ferenc Valent's profile photo
Lee Gray's profile photo
Ralf Summer's profile photo
Amit Vaidya's profile photo
noor ulain's profile photo
Asif Sameer's profile photo
Amzad Hossain's profile photo
Bronwyn Ngatai-Wilson's profile photo
Ion Ancutii's profile photo
Education
  • Purdue University
    BSEE, 1972 - 1977
  • Indiana University
    MS Bus Admin, 1990
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
March 6
Other names
Kubulai, Known as Kubulai on FaceBook, Twitter, YouTube -- everywhere except Google+ as Google refuses to acknowledge it
Story
Tagline
Professor, Engineer, Programmer, Social Activist, Consumer Advocate
Introduction
You have never lost until you agree that you are defeated.

Who am I?
Over time I have built a world-view, like constructing a map of the cosmos, and from this, essentially everything is understandable and anything is possible. The most important things that I have learned have been self-taught by picking up on or asking myself good, clear, penetrating questions to expose and articulate the hidden structures that underlie the experience of living.

It’s a complex world, and I believe we each should develop the facility to interact in a wide variety of ways. If something really interests me I have an incredible ability to stick with it — even though I have a larger perspective, I can be very focused and zero in on a point. I have always seen the world at many levels.

I’m always interested in developing expertise in new areas. I tend to be someone who looks at all the what-ifs, anticipating all possible scenarios and their likelihood: I rarely have just a 'plan A'. Once people comprehend the significance of what I am explaining to them, they usually also recognize its importance. The problem is that it may be ten years before they realize that I am right -- ten lost years which could have been productive.

Autonomy is important, to be respected for my own thoughts and feelings, ideas and creativity. It is frustrating when people simply dismiss a concept without trying to understand or worse when they actually fight against progress because doing the best thing for everyone would mean they collected less money than they could get otherwise. Greed is a very ugly abuser. Still, I never really think of others as 'too stupid to understand': only that I have somehow still not explained in a way that they can grasp, although sometimes I must concede that they simply don't want to understand. I am instinctively tolerant but the one thing I cannot stand is people who just don't care: about the quality of their own work or their effect on others' lives.

I am naturally organized, structured, and analytical. If a project enters my mind it immediately assumes the form of its pieces, its basic structure, and what sequence of events is required to get it done. This isn’t something I do: it happens instantaneously without effort. Issues are multifaceted and I try to think from different perspectives, not only my perspectives but others’ too. I’ve found it’s good to gather as many facts as I can. Sometimes there is a piece that needs to be thrown out, or maybe it’s the seed of another project.

My analytical instinct also makes me coolheaded even under extreme circumstances: when others loose their head in a disaster, or become trapped in placing blame, I am already working out solutions. If a shooter walked into my classroom and shot me in the heart, I would still act, knowing that I had about 6-8 seconds to stop him from harming anyone else before my body quit working.

I won’t do something if I feel I can’t do it well.
Bragging rights
Converted two organizations to Google email and survived.
Work
Occupation
Program Chair and CEO
Employment
  • API
    Owner, 2007 - present
  • Adult Life Training, Inc.
    CEO, 2003 - present
  • AgriStats, Inc.
    Sr. Programmer Analyst, 1998 - 2003
  • J & J Nash
    Owner, 1991 - 1998
  • Allied Aerospace / Bendix
    Design Engineer, 1978 - 1990
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Fort Wayne, IN USA - South Bend, IN USA
Contact Information
Work
Phone
260.432.0014 x128
Awesome pizza. Best in Fort Wayne.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
1 review
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