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Eve Gray
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A very important landmark in open humanities
An exciting day in academic publishing: the launch of the new Open Library of Humanities -- a platform that aims to help the humanities move to an open access model. OA is looked on with great suspicion by many in the humanities because they do not have a realistic way of paying article processing charges, and in many people's minds the phrases "open access" and "article processing charges" are inextricably, if wrongly, linked. But OLH's source of funding will be libraries. Here is a key passage in the post linked to below:

None of this would be possible without the support of the institutions that have already signed up to support the OLH. Indeed, the model that underpins the platform is novel for humanities journals: many libraries all paying relatively small sums into a central fund that we then use, across our journal base, to cover the labour costs of publication once material has passed peer review. Libraries that participate are given a governance stake in the admission of new journals. While this model is strange in many ways (as libraries are not really buying a subscription since the material is open access), it works out to be extremely cost effective for participants.

Why is it cost effective? Because libraries pay subscriptions and subscriptions are ridiculously expensive.

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A win for Google and the Hathi Trust in the US courts on mass digitisation of content for fair use. Via Michael Cader's Publishers' Lunch newsletter
http://lunch.publishersmarketplace.com/2014/06/appeals-court-upholds-hathi-trust-fair-use-rules-authors-guild-standing/

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Ben Goldacre makes a call on the WHO on the publication of clinical trials.

"AllTrials.net estimates that around half of all clinical trials have not been published. Currently, drug companies and researchers may withhold the results of clinical trials from doctors and patients, which can mislead people about the benefits or risks of a treatment. Transparency of clinical results would provide practitioners with more accurate estimates of the effects of interventions and prevent the repetition of costly research."

IP Watch Newsletter: http://www.ip-watch.org/2013/05/24/who-should-have-the-evidence-ben-goldacre-refutes-who-directors-claim/?utm_source=post&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=alerts

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A boon for under-resourced institutions and their researchers?
New universal repository for OA publications and data

Zenodo is an exciting new universal repository for researchers who don't have a good OA repository in their institution or field. Created by CERN and OpenAire, Zenodo accepts any kind of deposit (publication, poster, presentation, dataset, or multimedia), in any language, and allows the depositor to add any kind of license. It's integrated with DropBox for easy deposit, gives every deposit a DOI for easy citation, and fills in basic metadata fields automatically. Naturally, it's OAI-compliant.

Zenodo itself
http://www.zenodo.org/

Zenodo FAQ
http://www.zenodo.org/faq

Zenodo policies
http://www.zenodo.org/policies

Zenodo launch announcement
http://blogs.ifla.org/social-science/2013/05/08/zenodo-sharing-research-data-across-europe-making-science-more-visible/

I'm so impressed that I've added it to the short list of universal repositories I recommend in my online handout, How to make your own work open access.
http://bit.ly/how-oa 

#oa #openaccess #zenodo

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+David Worth These are wonderfully evocative photos of modern archaeology

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This is an important debate - we need to articulate the developing world view on these issues.

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An important and urgent petition to push for a rethink of a retrograde maximalist IP approach built into a secretly-negotiated proposal for a Pan-African IP body (PAIPO). The creation of  PAIPO will be put to a vote of African Ministers in mid-November. Without voices from the development community the Ministers may not be aware that they might risk signing away hard-won concessions on access to affordable medicines, farmer's control over seed crops, access for the visually impaired on a continent with a very high rate of blindness, and access to knowledge.
Most of all, the African continent needs an IP regime that gives it control over its own production of knowledge rather than being cast as the consumer of knowledge products from powerful countries and corporations.

http://www.change.org/petitions/a-new-course-for-the-pan-african-intellectual-property-organization-is-urgently-needed
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