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Naomi Parkhurst
1,058 followers -
Fiber arts lover and peripatetic reference librarian. Information dilettante.
Fiber arts lover and peripatetic reference librarian. Information dilettante.

1,058 followers
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Naomi's posts

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Omega is a Greek letter, used as the scientific symbol for the ohm, the unit for measuring electrical resistance. This makes it a useful symbol for resistance in general, and so I’ve made it into charts for your craftivism needs. There’s one version…

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Periodically I blog about some of my knitting experiments – I call these études, after the kind of musical exercises. I recently joined Instagram (@gannetdesigns) and have been joining in with the @yarnlovechallenge, which provides photo prompts on a…

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A year and a half ago, I wrote a blog post about a pair of socks I was knitting for myself, talking about my design decisions and how I messed around with a stitch pattern called braid stitch from a stitch dictionary to make it sit correctly on the top of…

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The word of the month is Coffee, suggested by Nim on Patreon. I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever.

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This month, the random number generator chose coffee, suggested by Nim. I have a little feeling that a lot of you will be very pleased right now, as I know just how many people love coffee. I’ve never acquired a taste for the beverage myself (I’m a tea…

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Just a small blog post this week. I’ve been rewriting my basic instructions for how to design secret patterns based on words. I knit these three swatches to go with the post about turning a code grid into a stitch pattern. While I love the lace designs I…

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I published two stitch patterns for the word Resist a couple of weeks ago, and today I’ve done the same for Persist. I converted the letters of Persist into numbers, and then used those numbers to make a lace chart. There is also a chart for stranded…

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Christine Guest has been posting an interesting set of round ups about double increases, and in it she made a challenge to create a corresponding increase to the 3-to-2 decrease that’s also known as Bunny Ears Back.

A side note – the Stitch Maps system now has that decrease as an option. This blog post shows two stitch patterns using that technique – I really like the Little Hearts stitch pattern in particular.

Anyway! So my mind immediately started turning over the question of a symmetrical 2-to-3 increase. In some sense, the obvious thing is just two stitches with an increase in between: lifted increases, a YO, or the kind of m1 that involves lifting a bar. But if you don’t want a hole, you have to twist the increase. I am generally happy enough with the invisibility of lifted increases and don’t worry about their asymmetricality.

Still, I’m always up for challenges like this. Even if I don’t succeed, I often find interesting things along the way. I tried out three different methods that I think could genuinely be called 2-to-3 increases.


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I published a chart for the word Resist converted to stranded knitting a couple of weeks ago, and today I’ve got the lace version ready. I converted the letters of Resist into numbers, and then used those numbers to make a chart. (The lace is based on a…

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The word of the month is Gritty, suggested by Natasha on Patreon. I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever.
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