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Naomi Parkhurst
1,059 followers -
Fiber arts lover and peripatetic reference librarian. Information dilettante.
Fiber arts lover and peripatetic reference librarian. Information dilettante.

1,059 followers
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I published two stitch patterns for the word Resist a couple of weeks ago, and today I’ve done the same for Persist. I converted the letters of Persist into numbers, and then used those numbers to make a lace chart. There is also a chart for stranded…

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Christine Guest has been posting an interesting set of round ups about double increases, and in it she made a challenge to create a corresponding increase to the 3-to-2 decrease that’s also known as Bunny Ears Back.

A side note – the Stitch Maps system now has that decrease as an option. This blog post shows two stitch patterns using that technique – I really like the Little Hearts stitch pattern in particular.

Anyway! So my mind immediately started turning over the question of a symmetrical 2-to-3 increase. In some sense, the obvious thing is just two stitches with an increase in between: lifted increases, a YO, or the kind of m1 that involves lifting a bar. But if you don’t want a hole, you have to twist the increase. I am generally happy enough with the invisibility of lifted increases and don’t worry about their asymmetricality.

Still, I’m always up for challenges like this. Even if I don’t succeed, I often find interesting things along the way. I tried out three different methods that I think could genuinely be called 2-to-3 increases.


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I published a chart for the word Resist converted to stranded knitting a couple of weeks ago, and today I’ve got the lace version ready. I converted the letters of Resist into numbers, and then used those numbers to make a chart. (The lace is based on a…

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The word of the month is Gritty, suggested by Natasha on Patreon. I usually develop a complicated knitting stitch pattern for each word, but I also like to provide a basic chart for any craft that’s worked on a grid: beads, cross stitch, whatever.

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The word Gritty, encoded as numbers and turned into a knitting stitch pattern.

This month, the random number generator chose gritty, suggested by Natasha. I think we can all use a little determination right about now. Each month, my Patreon backers have the chance to suggest words for me to encode as knitting stitches. A random…

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Next in rewrite of encoding words as knitting stitches: turning code grid into stitch pattern

It’s been a while since I took a break from rewriting my basic instructions on turning words into stitch patterns. This is the next in the sequence; once I’ve written everything up, I’ll update the old version. You might be asking yourself how to turn a…

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On Saturday I went to the nearest Women’s March; not the one in Washington, DC. It was a moving experience, and it derailed my plans for today’s blog post. Below, you’ll find a chart for stranded knitting based on the word Resist. I turned the letters…

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It’s been a while since I did a link round-up! Knitted Borders and Corners – some different ways of approaching corners when working a knitted-on border. Learning, Practicing, Perfecting – Sara Lamb writes here about the learning process in respect to…

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The 2017 stitch pattern had me thinking about stitch patterns with three row repeats. There are some out there, but I don’t know why there’s not more. Anyway, here’s a stitch pattern I thought of because of 2017. It’s entirely possible that I’m not the…
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