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Terry Hancock
Works at Downunder Observatory
Lives in Fremont Michigan
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Terry Hancock

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+Lluís Romero Ventura thanks Lluis
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Wonderful Job!
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This Butterfly has a Propeller
This image forms part of a mosaic that I acquired last season which I decided to review for a number of reasons but mainly as I am using a different technique to eliminate the typical salmon pink when H-Alpha is added to an RGB image particularly if used as a luminance layer. I also hope to further enhance the mosaic by using OIII and SII filters this season provided the weather and my health cooperate. 

I created my own annotated view you can see here. 

This first of 4 images to my newly processed mosaic I am releasing is that of this area which includes part of The Gamma Cygni Nebula IC1318A (LBN 251) a diffuse emission nebula (bottom right) and LBN239 combined is otherwise known as The Butterfly Nebula. DWB-111 (bottom left) otherwise known as The Propeller Nebula.
NGC 6866 (top left) open star cluster
IC 1311 (middle right) open star cluster
LBN 243 (to the right of centre) emission nebula 

Captured using LRGB + H-Alpha filters

Total Exposure time 4+ hours 

Equipment

QHY11S monochrome CCD cooled to -20C
QHY5IIL Monochrome Guiding CCD
Takahashi E-180 F2.8 Astrograph
Paramount GT-1100S Robotic Telescope Mount
Image Acquisition Maxim DL
Stacking and Calibrating: CCDStack
Registration of images in Registar
Post Processing Photoshop CS5
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Explore The Virgo Cluster. Astronomy Magazine May 2015
Live large this month as you observe some of the biggest objects in the universe.
text by Michael E. Bakich; image by Terry Hancock

MAY IS A GREAT TIME TO OBSERVE galaxies in the evening
sky. The densest part of the Milky Way (in Scorpius and
Sagittarius) hasn’t risen high yet, so intervening dust and gas
won’t impede your view of the star cities that lie in the distance.
You’ll find lots of the Northern Hemisphere’s spring galaxies
in the constellations Ursa Major, Leo, and Canes Venatici,
but the thickest concentration inhabits Coma Berenices and
Virgo. This region marks the center of our local supercluster. To
help you navigate this region, we’ve prepared this guide based
on the terrific image sent in by Terry Hancock of Fremont,
Michigan. Even a 4-inch telescope under a dark sky will reveal
the brightest galaxies shown. Bigger scopes will disclose more.
Explore the Virgo Cluster
Michael E. Bakich is a senior editor of Astronomy. Terry Hancock is an
avid astroimager who collects photons from Fremont, Michigan. 

original mage here https://www.facebook.com/DownUnderObservatory/photos/a.390935334286749.83243.390932634287019/713498388697107/?type=3&theater

......thanks to Michael & all at Astronomy Magazine
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That is just magnificent!
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Auriga Cosmic Garden
Several different types of objects here, Star Clusters IC417 and NGC193 also known as The Spider and The Fly embedded in hydrogen gas, Messier open clusters M36 and M38 (The Starfish Cluster) and emission Nebulae Sh2-231 and Sh2-235 (furthest left)

Image details
Size: 2.73 x 4.11 deg (4004 x 2667 pixels) 
Captured March 17, 2015
Total integration Time 192 minutes
Location: DownUnderObservatory, Fremont, MI
H-Alpha 80 min, 10 x 8 min bin 1x1
LRGB 112 min, 7 x 4 min each 1x1
QHY11 monochrome CCD cooled to -20C
Takahashi E-180 F2.8 Astrograph
Paramount GT-1100S German Equatorial Mount
Image Acquisition Maxim DL
Stacking and Calibrating: CCDStack
Post Processing Photoshop CS5
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Just Awesome... 
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The Horsehead, Flame and IC434 Nebulae
A much wider view in color covering 3.48 x 2.18 degrees captured over 4 seasons using LRGB + H-Alpha filters showing the immensity of the bright Emission Nebula IC434.
This is a combination of data captured from my backyard observatory in Western Michigan between 2011 and 2014 using QHY9 and QHY11 Mono CCD’s, 5 inch TMB 130 and TMB92 refractors, AT12RC and Takahashi E180 Astrographs, processed with CCDStack, Registar and CS5
 
 
Part of the Orion Molecular Cloud, an immense star forming region very close to earth, The Flame and Horsehead Nebulas offer a glimpse into the process from which stars and their planets are created. The colorfully lit areas are being irradiated by the young stars which have formed in the recent past and as a result, the ionized hydrogen in the clouds glows. The dark regions, on the other hand, are areas of dusty material in the interstellar medium dense enough to obscure the glow from behind. The Horsehead is such an object and from our vantage point on Earth, it bears a striking resemblance to the head of a horse.
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Cindy
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Terry Hancock

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The Gamma Cygni/Sadr Region, named after the central star Sadr/Gamma Cygni the central star of Cygnus's Cross surrounded by diffuse emission and dark nebulae and part of the much larger Cygnus Molecular Cloud. 

View my video "Tour Of Gamma Cygni" on You Tube here www.youtube.com/watch?v=AlmxFA2_gww

I created this mosaic originally consisting of 5 panels and later cropped to make 4 panels. 187 individual frames and a total exposure time of over 18 hours make up this Mosaic which covers an area approximately 6.5 x 5.4 degrees. Equipment used, QHY11 Monochrome CCD and Takahashi E-180. 
Music "Suppose" by Otto A. Junker
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The Gamma Cygni/Sadr Region, named after the central star Sadr/Gamma Cygni the central star of Cygnus's Cross surrounded by diffuse emission and dark nebulae and part of the much larger Cygnus Molecular Cloud.
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+sourav maiti thanks
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brilliant my friend
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Astronomy Photo of the Day: 3/22/15 — Wide-Field View of North America Nebula Quarks & Quasars

Thanks to the Editors of Quarks & Quasars for selecting my image of NGC7000

http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/apotd-wide-field-view-of-north-america-nebula/
Formally called NGC 7000 (or Caldwell 20), the North America Nebula can be found approximately 1,600 light-years from Earth in the Cygnus constellation...
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Awesome....! Beautiful work +Terry Hancock ...
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The Flaming Star Nebula
Seen here in color (LRGB+H-Alpha) and also seperately in H-Alpha.
 Also known as IC405 and Caldwell 31, lying at a distance of approximately 1500 light years from us in the constellation Auriga this mesmerizing object is a combination of emission and reflection Nebulae. 
Also visible towards the bottom left in this image is IC410 known as The Tadpoles lying at a much further distance of 12,000 light years, this faint Emission Nebula is energized by the neighboring Star Cluster NGC1893, far left in the image is emission Nebula IC417 at 10,000 light years distant containing an open cluster and sometimes referred to as the Spider Nebula. 
Image details
Size: 2.73 x 4.11 deg (4004 x 2667 pixels) 
Captured March 11, 2015
Total integration Time 192 minutes
Location: DownUnderObservatory, Fremont, MI
H-Alpha 80 min, 10 x 8 min bin 1x1
LRGB 112 min, 7 x 4 min each 1x1
QHY11 monochrome CCD cooled to -20C
Takahashi E-180 F2.8 Astrograph
Paramount GT-1100S German Equatorial Mount
Image Acquisition Maxim DL
Stacking and Calibrating: CCDStack
Post Processing Photoshop CS5

https://www.facebook.com/DownUnderObservatory
www.downunderobservatory.com
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Awesome...!!! Thank you dear +Terry Hancock for share.... 
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Terry Hancock

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The Horsehead, Flame and IC434 Nebulae
A much wider view in color covering 3.48 x 2.18 degrees captured over 4 seasons using LRGB + H-Alpha filters showing the immensity of the bright Emission Nebula IC434.
This is a combination of data captured from my backyard observatory in Western Michigan between 2011 and 2014 using QHY9 and QHY11 Mono CCD’s, 5 inch TMB 130 and TMB92 refractors, AT12RC and Takahashi E180 Astrographs, processed with CCDStack, Registar and CS5
 
 
Part of the Orion Molecular Cloud, an immense star forming region very close to earth, The Flame and Horsehead Nebulas offer a glimpse into the process from which stars and their planets are created. The colorfully lit areas are being irradiated by the young stars which have formed in the recent past and as a result, the ionized hydrogen in the clouds glows. The dark regions, on the other hand, are areas of dusty material in the interstellar medium dense enough to obscure the glow from behind. The Horsehead is such an object and from our vantage point on Earth, it bears a striking resemblance to the head of a horse.
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Stunning detail and clarity... what a beauty!
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Work
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Astro-Photographer
Employment
  • Downunder Observatory
    Owner, present
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Male
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Amateur Astro-photographer
Introduction

Astronomy and Photography have been my lifelong hobbies. I have combined the two hobbies and today I do my astro photography from my BYO (back yard observatory) located in a little town called Bridgeton, close to Fremont MI.

It was always a dream of mine to be able to see Andromeda and here with our relatively pollution free skies it can see it with the naked eye. My dream has been fulfilled and more that I have been able to capture the beauty and glory of the northern skies with my astro photography   

Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Fremont Michigan
Previously
South Australia - UK, Australia, USA