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Rebecca Clark
Attends California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
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Rebecca Clark

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Women shot by cops in Calif. were just delivering papers

Two women who were delivering newspapers in Torrance, Calif., early Thursday were shot by jittery Los Angeles police officers who mistakenly thought cop-hunting fugitive Christopher Dorner might be in their vehicle, NBCLosAngeles.com reported.

Read more: http://nbcnews.to/XTSJic
Photo: REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
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Rebecca Clark

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#somethingtothinkabout  
The New (Ab)Normal

Portion sizes have been growing. So have we. The average fast food meal today is more than four times larger than it was in the 50s. And adults are, on average, 26 pounds heavier. The culture of “supersized” meals has been growing slowly but surely re-educating us in the process of what a single meal portion actually is. Today, many of us have no clue. 

Why did it happen in the first place? Essentially, it all comes down to the amount of money the manufacturer can make of a single purchase. It very soon became clear that selling more of the same with a slightly increased price but in a larger quantity could give a higher profit margin rather than the same item bought twice. Think about the production and delivery costs and the paper work it takes to service one single item in your menu. It costs less to sell you a bigger burger for a slightly higher price rather than two burgers for a lower one. Very soon everyone starts making their products come out in value packs, a lot larger so to entice you with just a few extra cents attached to the price tag. It makes sense for you and it makes sense for the company selling you mini-wholesale. Somewhere down the road the new generation of consumers becomes confused over the amount of food per single portion that is required. The super-sized culture takes off due to the unquestionable consumption of the smallest serving by a single individual that in the past could feed a family of four. 

The mini-wholesale approach is making us overeat because we buy a lot more these days: we buy more and we eat more. We eat what we think is a portion for one because we were led to believe it is a portion for one. We buy huge buckets of ice-cream because it’s cheaper than buying smaller ones whenever we need some. We think we are saving money when in fact we just consume more. 

The same way clothing retailers offer you great discounts so you could purchase more items and spend more money with them overall.  The supersizing of people led retailers to use the same dirty tricks on customers who enjoy shopping more if they believe that they are smaller in size than they are. These days when you buy an S-size shirt that could really mean anything since some of the smarter brands know that that is the most profitable size they sell. How do you think x-small and xx-small came to exist? We all want to be small so we are provided with small, whatever size it may actually be, because it makes us feel good and buy more.

This affects us all and it’s important that we stop and think before accepting things as they are. We can still save money and we can still lead a healthy lifestyle as long as we are smart about it and don’t give in into value packs and great deals ending up consuming more than we need. When ordering at the restaurant it is almost always a good idea to split your super-sized portion with a friend or keep the other half for later on. Never ask for a larger portion, chances are the portion you are going to get is already way larger than you need. 

We don’t have to be supersized just because our meals and clothes are. It’s a choice and knowing what you know now you have a higher chance of making the right one.

Image © makinghealtheasier
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How about a Street View #gmapstip to liven up your Thursday? Open Google Maps on your Android device and follow these simple steps:

1. Press and hold on an area you want to explore
2. Tap the info box that pops up and hit “Street View”
Now for the cool part...
3. Tap the menu button on your phone
4. Select “Compass mode”

You can now explore the imagery by moving and tilting your phone!

Waikiki, Honolulu, HI on your Android!
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Meditation: Matthew 13:31-35

“The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed.” (Matthew 13:31)

M.C. Escher was a Dutch artist known for creating prints that were optical illusions. What you first see in an Escher print is seldom all there is to see.

The parables in today’s Gospel reading are like that. By themselves, they describe the profound growth of the kingdom of God. From a seed the size of a period on this page, a mustard tree can grow to be thir­teen feet tall. The “large amount” of flour in the second parable prob­ably weighed around six hundred pounds. And yet just a bit of yeast was all that was needed to turn that flour into bread!

These two parables, though, are part of a series of stories Jesus told about the kingdom of God. All are familiar: “A sower went out to sow,” “A man … sowed good seed in his field” (Matthew 13:3, 24). Sepa­rately, each relates a unique truth about the kingdom. But taken together, they point out another truth: the kingdom of God may not look like what you imagine.

Jesus wanted his followers to avoid idealizing the kingdom. He wanted to spare them from being disillusioned when the reality they saw did not match up to their expec­tation of a perfect, flawless, and problem-free church.

Yes, many seeds will be sown, but not every one will reach matu­rity. Good seed will be planted, but weeds will contaminate the field. Birds of all feathers will perch in the branches of the kingdom, and some will squawk or fight or make a mess. The “yeast” of worldly philosophies may even contaminate the “flour” of Christianity. But through it all, God is in control. His kingdom may not look as we think it ought to, but nei­ther is his plan thwarted!

“Don’t worry,” Jesus says. “I’ve got things under control. Despite every unpleasant appearance, growth will continue. My Father can deal with everything that shouldn’t be there. Don’t become disillusioned when things start looking different from the way you think they should. Trust in me. Trust in my Father. The kingdom will grow and endure until I come again.”

“Jesus, let your kingdom grow and flourish in me today. I trust you to take care of my messes and keep your word pure and true in my heart.”

Jeremiah 13:1-11 (Psalm) deuteronomy 32:18-21

http://wau.org/meditations/current/
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Have her in circles
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Final night of the first series (Finding God's Purpose for My Life) - Rediscover: Faith Speakers Series http://ow.ly/hvk8a
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“Only the one who does not question is safe from making a mistake.”
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A place where Texans who share the same beliefs can discover each other.
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Have her in circles
399 people
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  • California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
    present
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