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Steve Slavin
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Here is my review of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
The Gielgud Theatre, London July 2015.

I was asked to write a review of this great show about a boy with Asperger Syndrome for the National Theatre

http://adultswithautism.org.uk/
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I would like to walk down Autism Street, where everyone moves in the same direction as me. People would move on tracks along predetermined routes. No-one would be permitted to stop in front of me, or change their direction of travel.

Police sirens would be silent, and their flashing lights would be banned. Rules of behaviour would be clearly sign posted, and strictly adhered to.

With it’s safety and predictability, I would like to live on Autism Street.

 

Copyright © Steve Slavin 2015
http://adultswithautism.org.uk/

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AUTISTIC! is the term offensive?

Should you call someone autistic? When I was diagnosed with High Functioning Autism in 2008, I was told that I was definitely autistic by the psychologist. I don’t know why, but the word autistic sounded like a throw back to the days when the word retarded was acceptable for people with a learning disability. In fact words such as retarded, abnormal and maladjusted were used to describe children like me many years ago, I remember it well!.

As someone with autism, I always feel embarrassed about describing myself as autistic. It sounds more of a disabling condition than having autism.

Perhaps it’s because autistic sounds a bit like, (sorry for any offence caused), the term spastic. In the UK we had The Spastic Society, now called SCOPE, the leading charity for people with Cerebral Palsy. So they have decided to go with a more politically correct name.

Then we have the UK’s, National Autistic Society. Should they change their name to The National Autism Society? Why do acceptable words become unacceptable and even offensive over time? Perhaps ten years from now, it will be offensive to say that someone has autism. We could instead describe ourselves as developmentally different. We would then be people with DD!

So what’s in a name? It just depends on what society deems to be the accepted terminology and politically correct language at any given time.

Are you offended when called autistic?

Thanks for reading- Steve

www.adultswithautism.org.uk

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AUTISTIC! is the term offensive?

Should you call someone autistic? When I was diagnosed with High Functioning Autism in 2008, I was told that I was definitely autistic by the psychologist. I don’t know why, but the word autistic sounded like a throw back to the days when the word retarded was acceptable for people with a learning disability. In fact words such as retarded, abnormal and maladjusted were used to describe children like me many years ago, I remember it well!.

As someone with autism, I always feel embarrassed about describing myself as autistic. It sounds more of a disabling condition than having autism.

Perhaps it’s because autistic sounds a bit like, (sorry for any offence caused), the term spastic. In the UK we had The Spastic Society, now called SCOPE, the leading charity for people with Cerebral Palsy. So they have decided to go with a more politically correct name.

Then we have the UK’s, National Autistic Society. Should they change their name to The National Autism Society? Why do acceptable words become unacceptable and even offensive over time? Perhaps ten years from now, it will be offensive to say that someone has autism. We could instead describe ourselves as developmentally different. We would then be people with DD!

So what’s in a name? It just depends on what society deems to be the accepted terminology and politically correct language at any given time.

Are you offended when called autistic?

Thanks for reading- Steve

www.adultswithautism.org.uk

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New! Podcast series: "Views from the inside"

In this series of podcasts, I will be interviewing people that are either on the autistic spectrum, or have a lot of experience of working with, or caring for people on the spectrum.

The autistic adults I will be interviewing, talk about their everyday experiences of having autism. Their stories go way beyond the headline definitions of autism as found on many websites. We hear about the reality of trying to live independently as an autistic person in a difficult neural-typical world.

In this first interview in the series, I talk to Lucy. She is a thirty year old woman that was diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome at the age of nineteen. This diagnosis came after years of depression, anxiety, auditory processing and social problems. I have worked with Lucy at the National Autistic Society in London for the past six years, and have always admired her for the care, expertise and compassion she brings to the autistic adults we work with.

Like me, Lucy has been able to use her own experience as an autistic person, combined with years of experience and training to make a real difference to many adults struggling with autism.

www.adultswithautism.org.uk

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Yes depression and anxiety is common amongst children with autism. I was severely depressed as as an autistic child and later as an autistic adult
Depression in Young People with Asperger's and High-Functioning Autism
“Do teenagers with Asperger syndrome usually suffer from depression? If so, why? And what should parents look for if they believe their teenager is becoming depressed?” Unfortunately, depression does seem to be common among teens and adults with Asperger’s ...
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