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Emma Johnson
738 followers -
WealthySingleMommy.com, Like a Mother on iTunes. Closing the pay gap.
WealthySingleMommy.com, Like a Mother on iTunes. Closing the pay gap.

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In this episode, Erin and I talk about what she knows best —

How Millennials can thrive financially.

This includes:

Get out of debt
Have an awesome career and financial future
Navigate tricky social pickles, like talking about money with your boyfriend or girlfriend, splitting the bill (or not!) with your friends
Unless you have a free ride or parents with deep pockets, don’t finance a fancy college degree if it means years of debt.
How to network like a mo-fo
The critical reason everyone needs a “fuck off fund” (the reasons are more serious than you think)

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Here’s the thing with life insurance: You know you’re supposed to have it, but you probably don’t because you think it is not affordable. Guilt and stress ensue. Ain’t nobody got time for that!

You are not alone …

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Here is a list of my favorite tools. I have personally vetted every single one of these brands and researched them for you. For some links, I do receive a commission, and I don’t feel bad about that: These are great products that might make your life better, and the more money I earn, the more time and energy I can focus on supporting single moms. Have I ever steered you wrong?



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We all know that most moms who work NEED to work. Otherwise, you and your family would be living in a van down by the river. And even then you and your kids and maybe your elderly parents and disabled sibling you care for would need to eat once in a while. Oh, and you need clothes and blankets and bandaids and tampons. You know, stuff. To live. So you work. Just like 71 percent of moms. Just like the 40 percent of moms who are the BREADWINNERS in their families.

Likely, you know about those Census figures because they come from the reputable people at Pew, and they have been published a ZILLION TIMES because nearly every thinking mom — and dad, and employer, and politician and curious person — cares about these things.

Don’t get me wrong: Working mom guilt is a real and terribly dangerous thing. And who can blame us for having conflicting feelings about earning a living while raising children. A recent Pew survey found that the majority of Americans believe it’s harder to raise children when the mother works outside of the home, and another survey by Pew found that 60 percent of Americans believe children are better off when a parent is at home, and a mere 21 percent of adults say the trend of more mothers of young children working outside the home has been good for society. This attitude trickles into how we feel about our parenting, as 38 percent of full-time working mothers say they spend too little time with their kids. By comparison, the Washington, D.C., think tank found that just 18 percent of part-time working mothers and 11 percent of non-working mothers say the same.

Therein lies the paradox of our time: While a majority of Americans believe that children fare better when their mothers stay home full-time, the majority of American moms work.

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We all know that most moms who work NEED to work. Otherwise, you and your family would be living in a van down by the river. And even then you and your kids and maybe your elderly parents and disabled sibling you care for would need to eat once in a while. Oh, and you need clothes and blankets and bandaids and tampons. You know, stuff. To live. So you work. Just like 71 percent of moms. Just like the 40 percent of moms who are the BREADWINNERS in their families.

Likely, you know about those Census figures because they come from the reputable people at Pew, and they have been published a ZILLION TIMES because nearly every thinking mom — and dad, and employer, and politician and curious person — cares about these things.

Don’t get me wrong: Working mom guilt is a real and terribly dangerous thing. And who can blame us for having conflicting feelings about earning a living while raising children. A recent Pew survey found that the majority of Americans believe it’s harder to raise children when the mother works outside of the home, and another survey by Pew found that 60 percent of Americans believe children are better off when a parent is at home, and a mere 21 percent of adults say the trend of more mothers of young children working outside the home has been good for society. This attitude trickles into how we feel about our parenting, as 38 percent of full-time working mothers say they spend too little time with their kids. By comparison, the Washington, D.C., think tank found that just 18 percent of part-time working mothers and 11 percent of non-working mothers say the same.

Therein lies the paradox of our time: While a majority of Americans believe that children fare better when their mothers stay home full-time, the majority of American moms work.

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Are you divorced? Still have your engagement ring? How to sell your diamond online, and WHY getting rid of a memento from a past relationship will welcome new love in. 

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Single moms and single dads have special tax breaks to save on filings. Here is what you need to know! 

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Believe it or not, you can start to talk to kids this age about patience. An ideal age to start teaching kids about delayed gratification is 2 years old, says Emma Johnson, financial journalist and founder of WealthySingleMommy.com. "If they have their own allowance or birthday money, make them wait 24 hours to make any purchase," she says.

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Many companies (finally!) recognize the challenges of working full-time and raising a family, and now listen to research that finds that companies that support working parents, including nursing moms, is better for the bottom line. Many started to offer perks to make it a little easier.

Kate Torgersen of Milk StorkSaveFor instance, BBVA Compass recently announced a partnership with an awesome startup Milk Stork, a service that enables employees who are moms and are traveling on the job to ship breast milk home overnight for a nominal fee. Kate Torgersen, mom and founder of Milk Stork, shares on this episode why companies are inspired to support working parents with these benefits.
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