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Selman Design
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New art for The New York Times
AD: Alexandra Zsigmond

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Robert Llewellyn Bradshaw - Saint Kitts and Nevis
Illustrated by Anna Dawson

Robert Llewellyn Bradshaw was a Kittitian political leader and equal rights and labor activist who served his country for nearly 40 years. As a young man, Bradshaw became acutely aware of the heavy social impact that was imposed upon the islands due to the mainly white-controlled sugar industry. Unable to reconcile his religious beliefs with the rampant inequality he saw around him, Bradshaw became an authority of worker’s rights and advocated for equal treatment regardless of ethnicity. Bradshaw organized and led several effective strikes as the president of the St. Kitts-Nevis Trades and Labour Union. Bradshaw’s efforts helped to refine the labor conditions in St. Kitts and pave the way towards independence from British control. He was posthumously awarded the title of First National Hero by the National Assembly of Saint Kitts and Nevis and in his honor, the international airport in Saint Kitts now bears his name.

The artistic inspiration draws from Bradshaw's strong roots in the Saint Kitts sugar industry. It was in the sugar factories that Bradshaw first witnessed and became troubled by the exploitation of sugar workers, which sparked his move towards a life in union advocacy and political leadership. Outside politics, Bradshaw had a flare for fine living, which was demonstrated by his strong interest in heraldry. When Coat of Arms designs were submitted for the new Associated State, he eagerly examined and critiqued every submission until one was deemed "unique and appropriate."

For more portraits and information about the project please visit
www.peace-post.com and follow along on Instagram @projectpeacepost
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Felicia Browne - Saint Lucia
Illustration by Evan Anthony

Felicia Dujon Browne is a St. Lucian advocate for human, gender and children’s rights. As the founder and president of the Caribbean Mentorship Institute, Browne has worked to provide mentoring programs to youths across the Caribbean, embracing a philosophy that “every youth has the potential to succeed.” Additionally, Browne serves as a lecturer in philosophy of law, gender, metaphysics and moral philosophy at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill. Browne states, “We must continue to advocate for alternative solutions for peace-building and development in our small nations...Caribbean nations are beginning to experience the effects of economic and social violence. We must engage our youths to think positively of themselves and their communities. Our youths need to experience peace within their homes, their schools, their communities and most importantly, within the countries.” In recognition of her work, Felicia was recently nominated as Ambassador For Peace by the Universal Peace Federation.

The flag of Saint Lucia was designed by Dunstan St. Omer, a Saint Lucian painter known for his vibrant colors, "prismism" technique, and religious murals. His son, Luigi St. Omer, continues the tradition of beautiful paintings depicting Saint Lucian life. This illustration combines the St. Omer family's colorful and religious sensibilities with the graceful sculptural forms of the Eudovic family of Saint Lucian artists, portraying Felicia with a group of children from the Caribbean Mentorship Institute.

For more portraits and information about the project please visit
www.peace-post.com and follow along on Instagram @projectpeacepost
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Nicole Sylvester - Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Illustration by Anne Di Lillo

Nicole Sylvester was a prominent Vincentian lawyer and activist who served as president of both the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) Bar Association and the Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Human Rights Association. Sylvester was renowned for love of country and democracy, often using her position to fight for the rights of Vincentians pro bono and working to promote free and fair elections. Nicole rose to national attention in 2008 when she took on a case involving the alleged rape and cover-up of a policewoman by St. Vincent’s Prime Minister, Dr. Ralph Gonsalves. Despite her good health, Sylvester contracted a dubious illness which led to an eventual stroke for which she never recovered. She passed away at the age of 51 in 2015 leaving behind two sons. The circumstances around her illness remain in question and many suspect the administration in question of conducting foul play.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is known as the “gems of the Antilles”, represented by three diamonds on their national flag. In Ms. Sylvester’s portrait these shapes are scattered and uneven, mimicking a shattered larger diamond– a strong advocate for human rights for her community, taken from them far too soon.

For more portraits and information about the project please visit
www.peace-post.com and follow along on Instagram @projectpeacepost
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Thanks to your support we've already donated $2,000 to the ACLU. If you haven't already, get the goods at www.usmeansallofus.com.

Let's keep this good thing going!
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Tuisina Ymania Brown - Samoa
Illustration by Julian Mei

Tuisina Ymania Brown is a Samoan human rights activist and the Technical Director of the Samoa Fa’afafine Association, an NGO that fights for the the rights of indigenous lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex citizens in the country. Fa’afafine is a third gender characterized by individuals who were born male, but display both male and feminine personality traits. Fa’afafine are an important and recognized part of Samoan history and culture, yet they often find themselves discriminated against and devoid of legally recognized status. As a young child, Tuisina witnessed the death of a famous fa’afafine performer who had been beaten in front of her own house. Empowered by what she saw Tuisina was propelled into activism fighting for respect, equality and recognition of all genders in Samoa and throughout Oceania. Tuisina successfully introduced legislation that decriminalized “impersonation of a woman”, a crime for which many fa’afafine had been previously jailed. Tuisina continues to work through her organization along with the UN and Samoan National Human Rights Institution to help defend, define and educate Samoa on gender identity and human rights issues.

Julian was immediately charmed and enlivened by the kindness and goodwill engendered by both Tuisina’s photograph and touching life story. Utilizing motifs and themes from Samoan tatau art, the portrait is hand-drawn pen and ink. While many tatau compositions are random and fluid, this portrait was intended to connect her generous heart to her cultural heritage, radiating outward and conveying her mission of spreading awareness abroad.

For more portraits and information about the project please visit
www.peace-post.com and follow along on Instagram @projectpeacepost
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Let Don and the gang know: US Means All of Us!

All shirt proceeds donated to the ACLU. Please visit usmeansallofus.com for more.
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Love seeing our HalfTone posters in the wild. If you have one please post and tag us. This one comes from our friend Alex!
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Head to the website to download the free poster file. Print, post and tag #usmeansallofus to show your support!

www.usmeansallofus.com
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Mike repping with one of the large US Means All of Us posters that were just delivered to the shop. Look out for them in a borough near you!

Go to https://www.usmeansallofus.com/ for more. All shirt sales go to support the ACLU Nationwide. Thanks for your support.
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