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Michelle Scandura
Attends University of Texas at Dallas
Lives in Dallas, TX, United States
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Michelle Scandura

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New post on the blog! :)
I’m not going to lie, I love me some online shopping! Perhaps too much at times. Don’t get me wrong, I’m actually a mall girl too, but I just love seeing whats new as soon as possible! Maybe I’m just part of the instant gratification era, but I’m also sensible enough to know that it’s... Read more »
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Considering that I was born in 1991, I have always lived in a world where sound has been attached to cinema, TV, etc. It’s something that I expect to be there. Not that cinema and entertainment can’t be successful without sound in todays era. Take The Artist for example, a silent film that was very successful.  
However, there are certain things that are just lacking when sound isn’t present that cannot be duplicated with any other element. Take space for example. According to Chion and Brewster, “The space defined by the sound is not the same as that once constructed by the image.” (73). Though I couldn’t think of a specific example that helped me relate this, I came up with my own. I pictured a person lost in the forest who is being shouted to by a search party that is trying to locate him/her. In a silent film, I can see the forest, and I can assume that it’s vast, however I don’t really know how far away the search party is without sound. However, if I can hear the echoes, I know that they are indeed far. Sound isn’t the only identifier of space, but it is a valuable one. This is interesting to think about in terms of our portfolio project… that I can create the feeling of vast space (outer space in my portfolio for example) just by sound.
Something else that I feel like is important to remember for the portfolio project from this reading is the section on rendering and reproduction of sound. Particularly, “the sound does not attempt to reproduce the real noises of the situation, but to render the physical impact” (71). This makes me think of foley art, which is a practice used for both cinema and video games where sound is reproduced. Typically the sound is reproduced by something that represents the sound but isn't the actual sound. Such as hitting a leather cushion topped with a wet cloth with a celery stalk to create the sound of punching someone (as seen in the video).
Because the nature of my own portfolio project (and I assume others can relate) is fictional, I feel like this idea of rendering and reproduction of sound will be something that I will practice in my own project. Because let’s be honest… I’m not going to REALLY capture the sound of a cat in space.
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Bailey Michele Stearns's profile photoCameron Gallucci's profile photoCarey Chan's profile photo
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You have a great point made with the example made by the search party and the forest. In silent films, they would show people screaming to search for the person and then it will then cut to a screen with the caption of the words on it, but in a modern film, there is no need to switch visual mediums to translate the message that is being conveyed. Sound and hearing makes up one of the five senses that humans have and the importance of sound reproduction is a very subtle, yet significant element  of a film. If you are unaware, it is quite something you would only truly notice in the absent of the reproduction of sound. I would describe sound as the cream of the crop of production. And thank God us humans are intelligent enough to recreate the physical sounds without having to literally do the act of mimic just to recreate the sounds. And for that as you said, we have Foley.
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Michelle Scandura hung out with 4 people. <a class='ot-hashtag' href='https://plus.google.com/s/%23hangoutsonair'>#hangoutsonair</a>Patti McLetchie, Sydnie Montgomery, Chelsea Upton, and Carrie Lackey
Beauty is in the eye of the webcam
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Michelle Scandura hung out with 1 person. <a class='ot-hashtag' href='https://plus.google.com/s/%23hangoutsonair'>#hangoutsonair</a>Patti McLetchie
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Have her in circles
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Recently, my younger brother requested my help with writing a paper on artistic remix by asking “do you know anything about remix art?”. I answered, “Well I almost have an EMAC degree, so yes. I know literally everything. EMAC is obsessed with remix”. I joke here when I say that I know everything, and Eli Horwatt has proven that statement that I made to really just be a joke. There is still plenty more to learn and with so many outlets for digital video remixing, how can one ever really call themselves “an expert”?
Horwatt makes many interesting statements and outlines many examples that have forced me to delve a bit deeper into my understanding of digital video remixing. He states, “this practice has been given a new life on the Internet with the proliferation of digital video files online, developments in editing software and the draw of video distribution portals like YouTube.” (Horwatt). Certain mash ups and remixes (like the SUV example) can easily be given a new life just by adding certain sounds and super imposing text. What makes these mash ups so powerful is that the original/found footage is juxtapositioned against the controversial text/sound and thus given a new life and new meaning. 
However, digital video remixing is not only used for bashing corporations and juxtaposition purposes. It can also be used to create a message and aesthetic that could not be created without the use of found footage. For example, Lana Del Rey’s “Video Games” music video is compromised simply of found footage and what seems to be rather shotty footage of Miss Lana Del Rey (or Lizzy Grant if you please) lip-syncing in front of a webcam. As a fan of this video, I find it hard to say that I could imagine it any other way. However, even those viewing the video for the first time can agree that the found footage gives it a new life and unique aesthetic that can only be created from said found footage. The nostalgic footage goes along very nicely with Lana’s very vintage sounding voice. This method was so successful that Lana tends to repeat it amongst her other videos. I look forward to seeing how digital remixing of videos continues to evolve and lend itself to creating new life in the digital world. 

Lana Del Rey - Video Games
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Digital video remixing may be the death of me in this major!! I do like how it is primarily compromised of many works that contribute well to the final project, even if they were all create in different times, place and for different purposes. However, I am a bit of a stickler when it comes to rules, and understand that copyright infringement and artists getting their feelings hurt over "stolen" material is a very real thing. With that in mind, I like that Horwatt uses the phrase "new life" many times as he talks about what he wants to get out of remixing. It is not simply about being lazy and not wanting to develop original content, it is more about creating a feeling of freshness and rejuvenating work that can be used in a variety of ways. I love your Lana Del Rey example, I agree that her video would not be nearly as inspiring or as successful if the footage wasn't found and originally used elsewhere. The vintage feel of her brand (i.e. voice, look, style, etc), works perfectly with the old footage. This was a true success story for digital video remixing!!
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While reading the first few paragraphs of Stefans, “Language as Gameplay”, I must admit that I was a little bit confused as to what electronic literature really was, and if it was more immersive than traditional literature (books, movies, etc.). Are we talking about video games here? Interactive 4D type games like Disney's Toy Story Midway Mania (Toy Story Midway Mania [Full Ride]) where the player moves through out the seated attraction which features arcade games that they can play from their seats? Yes and no, I suppose. I feel as though these could qualify as engaging gameplay? But are they really electronic literature? Also, I'm not sure they come close to achieve Stefan's "Holy Grail". 

As I read on, I began to get a feel for what a electronic literature should posses in order to achieve "grail status" and began to put the pieces together. Something immersive, something with good graphic design, and as Stefan said himself "something that can be read – and which serves as a “game” with all the fun implied in such a designation." (Stefan 2012). I instantly had an idea of what something close to a holy grail might look like for Stefan, and that is “Inanimate Alice” (inanimatealice.com). Normally, I would never search for this kind of literature on my own, but I came across it in Barbara Vance’s Story Telling in New Media a few years ago and still vividly remember it. Inanimate Alice is a learning tool that tells a story through sound, text, moving image, and allows the user to take part in the story as well. There are often puzzles that the user is invited to solve, as well as choices that the user can make to steer the game in different directions. Thus, Inanimate Alice is immersive, it incorporates good graphic design, and it also acts as a game rather than just a story that one reads. I feel as though Stefan would approve of Inanimate Alice as I do. 

After finishing the reading, and relating it to Inanimate Alice, I am convinced that in some occasions electronic literature certainly can be more immersive than traditional literature because it incorporates everything that makes traditional literature successful (good story telling, immersion, etc) and takes it to the next level by adding moving image and being interactive.
Inanimate Alice - A Digital Novel
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+Carey Chan, I am curious how you think simulation games might apply to Stefans' theory. They have some of the same characteristics you mentioned for games - being able to be stimulated and immersed - but do they lack other more literary components that?
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Michelle Scandura

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Michelle Scandura hung out with 4 people. <a class='ot-hashtag' href='https://plus.google.com/s/%23hangoutsonair'>#hangoutsonair</a>Patti McLetchie, Sydnie Montgomery, Chelsea Upton, and Carrie Lackey
Beauty is in the eye of the webcam
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  • University of Texas at Dallas
    Emerging Media and Communications, present
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