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Nadine Drayton-Keen
Born again, saved, justified, being sanctified believer and reverend, evangelist, mother, grandmother....
Born again, saved, justified, being sanctified believer and reverend, evangelist, mother, grandmother....
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My Spirit’s Musings--my collection of insightful poetic expressions that reveal why reflecting God's Image is the best way for believers in Christ to demonstrate genuine Christlikeness.



This book is available in paperback or ebook at the following online bookstores:

Barnes & Noble

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/my-spirits-musings-nadine-drayton-keen/1125464920?ean=9781498490078

Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/My-Spirits-Musings.../dp/1498490077

Xulon Press

http://www.xulonpress.com/bookstore/bookdetail.php?PB_ISBN=9781498490078 
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The Couplet Poem:

As a literary device, the couplet is a verse that is part of a poem—like in the last two lines of a sonnet, or two consecutive rhyming lines in a dramatic monologue or a play. Usually, this kind of two-line verse is an “open couplet” because the couplet’s full meaning often cannot be ascertained from just its two lines.

Then too, the couplet also can be an independent poem or a “closed couplet.” If the couplet has the ability to stand alone from the rest of a poem or a play’s scenes it is considered to be "closed."

Whether an open or closed couplet, the couplet always has two consecutive rhyming lines that have the same meter (usually iambic pentameter). Additionally, the couplet always forms a complete thought, resolves a situation, or gives commentary on the work’s theme.

Some examples of couplets are as follows—2 open and 2 closed couplets, respectively:

But if thou live, remembere’d not to be,
Die single and thine image dies with thee. ~ from Shakespeare’s Sonnet III, lines 13-14

The time is out of joint: O cursed spite,
That ever I was born to set it right! ~ from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 5, Lines 188-189

A little learning is a dang'rous thing;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring: ~ from Alexander Pope’s An Essay on Criticism, Part 2, Lines 15-16

True wit is nature to advantage dress'd,
What oft was thought, but ne'er so well express'd, ~ from Alexander Pope’s An Essay on Criticism, Part 2, Lines 96-97

Currently, I am working on a third poetry anthology and a collection of daily Bible verses, prayers, and poems (inspiring relevant couplets). In the posted graphic is a sample of one of my many couplet poems.
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THIS!

AMEN . . . . .
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“Cease striving and know that I am God;
I will be exalted among the nations, I will be exalted in the earth.” ~ Psalm 46:10, NASB
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