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Nissim -sasson
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The prettiest florals for Spring: http://pin.it/ochKK8O
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The prettiest florals for Spring: http://pin.it/ochKK8O
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Psyche Abandoned, Augustin Pajou, 1790. France, 17th and 18th centuries

Alone and in despair, Psyche mourns the flight of Love, which she has involuntarily provoked. Despite having been forbidden as a mortal to look upon the god, Psyche could not resist discovering who was her lover at night. While Cupid slept, she watched him by the light of an oil lamp; moved by his beauty, she spilled a drop of oil. Cupid awoke and fled.  The lamp and a dagger (which she carried in case she encountered a monster) lie on the ground.
The sculpture was commissioned in 1783 by the Comte d'Angiviller, director of the Bâtiments du Roi (King's Buildings) as a companion piece to Bouchardon's Cupid Making a Bow from the Mace of Hercules (Louvre). Pajou chose the theme of Psyche, drawn from a tale by the Latin writer Apuleius (c. AD 125-170) and a poem by La Fontaine, the 17th-century French writer of fables. The work gave him the opportunity of creating a piece as fine as that of his illustrious predecessor, and also of rivaling his contemporary Houdon, whose bronze Diana the Huntress had been cast the previous year in 1782 (Huntington Art Gallery, San Marino, California).
The plaster cast was exhibited at the 1785 Salon and met with success tainted with scandal. Shocked by its total nudity, the priest of Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois obtained the withdrawal of the work from the Salon. It was displayed in the artist's studio nearby and brought the sculptor even more fame, albeit controversial in nature. Critics condemned the naturalistic rendering of the figure, her mannered pose, and the exaggerated expression of emotion in her face.

#myth   #mythology   #history   #art   #sculptures   #sculpture  
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Psyche Abandoned, Augustin Pajou, 1790. France, 17th and 18th centuries

Alone and in despair, Psyche mourns the flight of Love, which she has involuntarily provoked. Despite having been forbidden as a mortal to look upon the god, Psyche could not resist discovering who was her lover at night. While Cupid slept, she watched him by the light of an oil lamp; moved by his beauty, she spilled a drop of oil. Cupid awoke and fled.  The lamp and a dagger (which she carried in case she encountered a monster) lie on the ground.
The sculpture was commissioned in 1783 by the Comte d'Angiviller, director of the Bâtiments du Roi (King's Buildings) as a companion piece to Bouchardon's Cupid Making a Bow from the Mace of Hercules (Louvre). Pajou chose the theme of Psyche, drawn from a tale by the Latin writer Apuleius (c. AD 125-170) and a poem by La Fontaine, the 17th-century French writer of fables. The work gave him the opportunity of creating a piece as fine as that of his illustrious predecessor, and also of rivaling his contemporary Houdon, whose bronze Diana the Huntress had been cast the previous year in 1782 (Huntington Art Gallery, San Marino, California).
The plaster cast was exhibited at the 1785 Salon and met with success tainted with scandal. Shocked by its total nudity, the priest of Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois obtained the withdrawal of the work from the Salon. It was displayed in the artist's studio nearby and brought the sculptor even more fame, albeit controversial in nature. Critics condemned the naturalistic rendering of the figure, her mannered pose, and the exaggerated expression of emotion in her face.

#myth   #mythology   #history   #art   #sculptures   #sculpture  
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