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Piergiuliano Bossi
Works at Undisclosed company
Attended Computer Science - Universita' degli Studi di Milano
Lives in Toronto, Canada
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Piergiuliano Bossi

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A bit light IMO, probably because it's basically just marketing for the book, but it matches my experience (in a positive way).
I once worked in a team with an amazing developer, let’s call him Henry (not his real name). Henry refused to play the Tech Lead, preferring to stay as hands-on with code as much as possible. When the team had a technical problem, they would first go to Henry. He always offered a well-balanced...
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Piergiuliano Bossi

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I like the idea that you have to earn your license to kludge. I also like to think that once used, it takes time to replenish.
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"Factoring is about uncovering structural beauty in problem domains." < nice!
Refactoring is focused on the quality of code, while factoring aims to uncover the underlying beauty of the problem domain, as expressed in code. Instead of cleaning up your code, try factoring.
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Piergiuliano Bossi

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I can't see how anybody can disagree with even a single letter or comma here.
I enjoyed Brian Chesky's recent post Don't Fuck Up The Culture, where he proclaims to the employees of Airbnb the importance of culture in everything they do. I like Airbnb and it's nice to see a f...
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Brilliant!
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Piergiuliano Bossi

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Up until before the end I'd have NOT found it particularly useful: it seems to me to be just a way to inline comments in call chains (aka train wrecks :) ), which is error prone and it creates more maintenance work as the code evolves over time. But then the last bit is actually quite interesting, as a way to create (sort of) self documenting code. I'm not sure I'd do it, but it's intriguing.
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Priceless: If “premature optimization is the root of all evil”, then local optimization is the Devil’s half brother.
I've been floating between the worlds of Cloud and DevOps for a while now and it is interesting to see the Cloud world finally start to realize the real value is in DevOps. It's great that more peo...
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Piergiuliano Bossi

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Neat. So if you model your deployment pipeline by pushing images through registries, the last step may benefit from something like this.
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Oh dear, Artifactory has Docker support. I still have to think whether that is a good thing, but it can certainly put a stop to the proliferation of half-a**ed in-house registries.
Artifactory provides compelling features including P2 repository, build server integration, NuGet support, repo replication, yum
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Piergiuliano Bossi

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You gotta love the Jepsen series!
Previously, on Jepsen, we saw RabbitMQ throw away a staggering volume of data. In this post, we'll explore Elasticsearch's behavior under various types of network failure. Elasticsearch is a distributed search engine, built around Apache Lucene–a well-respected Java indexing library.
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Piergiuliano Bossi

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"A professional team of programmers make their code better each day. The quality of the code improves with time. [...] Professionals make things better with time. The Legacy code left by professionals will be cleaner and cleaner the older it is because it has enjoyed the long attention of those professionals." < true, I've experienced it, but sadly almost completely ignored by 99.9999% of the industry
We write beautiful web applications that are durable and free of defects in workmanship.
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Piergiuliano Bossi

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Agreed wholeheartedly. An additional complexity is represented by the inherent fragmented design that typically emerges from a microservice architecture, if not approached carefully.
It's also much easier to fall victim of a lack of abstraction and REST obsession in those individual microservices.
Last but not least, profiling and optimizing the performance of a microservice as a whole is at least an order of magnitude more difficult than dealing with a monolithic app.

Having said all this, in a lot of cases microservices offer a great architectural paradigm... it just needs to be handled with care.
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I really like how Arlo ties together anzaneering and experimentation.
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Story
Introduction

Amarcord:

  • I started developing software when I was 11 years old on a Sinclair ZX Spectrum. The biggest mistake that I’ve done since then was actually selling that little piece of hardware.
  • All I ever wanted was an Apple ][. It took me 25 more years to buy my first Apple computer, an iMac.
  • I was a Fidonet Point in 1990 (2:331/308.8 at Euforia BBS in Milan).
  • My first modem ran at 1200 baud

Less interesting things about me on my LinkedIn profile.

Education
  • Computer Science - Universita' degli Studi di Milano
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
thinkingbox, thebox
Work
Occupation
VP Engineering
Employment
  • Undisclosed company
    VP Engineering, 2014 - present
  • Points International Ltd.
    2013 - 2014
  • Garner Distributed Worflow
    Software Architect / Coach, 2008 - 2013
  • Decisioning Solutions
    2008 - 2008
  • CPNI
    2006 - 2007
  • Quinary
    2001 - 2005
  • Banca IMI
    1999 - 2001
  • IT Software
    1996 - 1999
  • Multigraphics
    1992 - 1996
  • SGS Elsag
    1991 - 1992
  • SGS Informatica
    1988 - 1991
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Toronto, Canada
Previously
Brianza (out of Milan, Italy)