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Eleonora Ferrero
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After nearly 7 years as CFO, I will be retiring from Google to spend more time with my family.  Yeah, I know you've heard that line before.  We give a lot to our jobs.  I certainly did.  And while I am not looking for sympathy, I want to share my thought process because so many people struggle to strike the right balance between work and personal life.

This story starts last fall. A very early morning last September, after a whole night of climbing, looking at the sunrise on top of Africa - Mt Kilimanjaro. Tamar (my wife) and I were not only enjoying the summit, but on such a clear day, we could see in the distance, the vast plain of the Serengeti at our feet, and with it the calling of all the potential adventures Africa has to offer. (see exhibit #1 - Tamar and I on Kili).

And Tamar out of the blue said "Hey, why don't we just keep on going". Let's explore Africa, and then turn east to make our way to India, it's just next door, and we're here already. Then, we keep going; the Himalayas, Everest, go to Bali, the Great Barrier Reef... Antarctica, let's go see Antarctica!?" Little did she know, she was tempting fate.

I remember telling Tamar a typical prudent CFO type response- I would love to keep going, but we have to go back. It's not time yet, There is still so much to do at Google, with my career, so many people counting on me/us - Boards, Non Profits, etc

But then she asked the killer question: So when is it going to be time? Our time? My time? The questions just hung there in the cold morning African air. 

A few weeks later, I was happy back at work, but could not shake away THE question: When is it time for us to just keep going? And so began a reflection on my/our life. Through numerous hours of cycling last fall (my introvert happy place) I concluded on a few simple and self-evident truths:

First, The kids are gone.  Two are in college, one graduated and in a start-up in Africa. Beautiful young adults we are very proud of. Tamar honestly deserves most of the credit here. She has done a marvelous job. Simply marvelous. But the reality is that for Tamar and I, there will be no more Cheerios encrusted minivan, night watch because of ear infections, ice hockey rinks at 6:00am. Nobody is waiting for us/needing us. 

Second, I am completing this summer 25-30 years of nearly non-stop work (depending on how you wish to cut the data). And being member of FWIO, the noble Fraternity of Worldwide Insecure Over-achievers, it has been a whirlwind of truly amazing experiences. But as I count it now, it has also been a frenetic pace for about 1500 weeks now. Always on - even when I was not supposed to be. Especially when I was not supposed to be. And am guilty as charged - I love my job (still do), my colleagues, my friends, the opportunities to lead and change the world.

Third, this summer, Tamar and I will be celebrating our 25th anniversary. When our kids are asked by their friends about the success of the longevity of our marriage, they simply joke that Tamar and I have spent so little time together that "it's really too early to tell" if our marriage will in fact succeed. 
If they could only know how many great memories we already have together. How many will you say? How long do you have? But one thing is for sure, I want more. And she deserves more. Lots more.

Allow me to spare you the rest of the truths. But the short answer is simply that I could not find a good argument to tell Tamar we should wait any longer for us to grab our backpacks and hit the road - celebrate our last 25 years together by turning the page and enjoy a perfectly fine mid life crisis full of bliss and beauty, and leave the door open to serendipity for our next leadership opportunities, once our long list of travels and adventures is exhausted.

Working at Google is a privilege, nothing less. I have worked with the best of the best, and know that I am leaving Google in great hands. I have made so many friends at Google it's not funny. Larry, Sergey, Eric, thank you for friendship. I am forever grateful for letting me be me, for your trust, your warmth, your support, and for so much laughter through good and not so good times.

To be clear, I am still here. I wish to transition over the coming months but only after we have found a new Googley CFO and help him/her through an orderly transition, which will take some time. 

In the end, life is wonderful, but nonetheless a series of trade offs, especially between business/professional endeavours and family/community. And thankfully, I feel I’m at a point in my life where I no longer have to have to make such tough choices anymore. And for that I am truly grateful. Carpe Diem.


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In the run up to #ebbfLondon 's May international event "how can I influence my work and world?" we cover today the topic of  
'How can I develop a meaningful career after University?'
 
‘ Deloitte has published its Millennial Innovation survey 2013.
The survey, conducted on 5.000 millennial in 18 countries, highlighting some interest finding such as the fact that 78% of Millennials believe that innovation is essential for business growth and that 87% believe the success of a business should be measured by more than just financial performance.
Millenials are looking for meaningful job’s opportunities and they want to be able to create their dream career.
Where to start?

Participate to the next EBBF Hangout 'How can I develop a meaningful career after University?'
 
During the hangout you will interact with Margherita Pagani, entrepreneur and founder of Fly the Gap, and with Alex Cabon, Manager Business Development at PwC who will be holding a learnshop at the event on this topic.

Only 8 spots available
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Innovare non significa pensare a cose nuove, ma alle cose in modo nuovo.
Ricorda che l’idea non deve essere utile. Deve semplicemente “essere”...
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After the 1st sell out meaningful hangout,
join this 2nd opportunity to engage with like-minded people from around the world wanting to ask questions and offer ideas on "what does sustainable wealth look like - in my life - ?"

We have invited someone who asked this questions in his own life and acted accordingly, changing his working life priorities drastically and now enjoying quality and coherent life: Jeff Lynn.

This is the second of a series of “ebbf meaningful hangouts” in the run-up to the ebbf annual conference #ebbf2013 http://makeitmeaningful.org covering some of the themes of this annual event.

We ideally hope you can join that annual learning event, but for the many who cannot attend, these hangouts help us hold those meaningful conversations around themes that are relevant to us and our role in our workplaces.

Ask the questions we have pending and help us take the ideas and some of the answers from these hangouts to “meaningful conversations” we aim to have in our own work environment, community, friends we wish to stimulate with a new way of thinking about sustainability and meaningful work.
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'Knowing that we have changed a system, inspired a new way of thinking and encouraged people to question and take action to be a part of the solution. This is my personal definition of success.'
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