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Adam Schwartzberg
Works at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab
Attended University of California, Berkeley
Lives in Oakland, CA
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Adam Schwartzberg

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I went out this morning to watch the eclipse. Cold and sleepy, but worth it.

Up on Grizzly peak above UC Berkeley every single pull out was completely full by the time the moon was in totality. An excellent reason to live here.
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We were sleepy and lame and didn't go look.
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Adam Schwartzberg

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I was cleaning out my new office and came across this amazing archeological find. I've never seen one of these before, but according to the intarwebs this is a disk for the IBM 3363 optical disk drive. In 1987 the drive was $3k and the disks were $65 each. I must say, that's serious storage for 1987. 
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I did use that. 200MB. Wow. Amazing times
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Adam Schwartzberg

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That's a good point. I don't think it's % of sales, because ones the ipod comes in it would have a huge bulge there. It kind of seems like a combination of icon width and just fitting stuff in. I'd really like to see one by % of sales though. That would be sweet.
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Adam Schwartzberg

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In Japan, even the warnings about choking babies and children are cute. Kawaiiiiiiiiiii
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Adam Schwartzberg

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Hey scientists, have you seen this google scholar profile thingie? It's nifty, you should make one, here's mine:

http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=StFVKlIAAAAJ
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Have him in circles
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Adam Schwartzberg

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For my friends who publish in academic journals, I thought you might be interested in seeing this:

http://thecostofknowledge.com/

It's a petition stating intent to boycott Elsevier. I signed it, you might want to as well. I believe that because science is paid for by the public,it should be available to the public at no cost. Grants pay for my research, they pay me to write the paper, then they pay me to review other's articles, all so a company can make a profit on my labor.

If this bothers you as much as it does me, you might consider signing this thing and adding your name to the list.
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The big for profit journals have a couple things going for them. In some cases, like Science and Nature, they have huge cache. The impact factor (or average number of citations per publication, the most "important" rating factor for journals) is higher than almost any other journal. For what it's worth, these journals are much closer to a magazine. They do produce some content on their own, and they spend a lot more time and money culling the heard of research to only present what they think is the most interesting/catchy.

The less impactful for profit journals are successful for a couple of reasons. One is historical. They've been around a long time, this is how the business has been done for hundreds of years, and when journals had to be printed and sent to every library in the world, huge fees make more sense (I suppose). Once a journal exists and has some body of people submitting to it, it will continue to propagate because people will alway need access to those articles. Without some kind of stimulus to get people to stop publishing there, there isn't really any driving force to change how they work.

Another reason that for profits are successful is that they do an end run around the people who actually pay for the journals. The people who bare the cost of the for profit journal, are not the same ones who choose where to publish. As far as I'm concerned, journals are free at LBL. For LBL though, it's a major cost of doing business. On the other hand, the open access journals require that the authors pay some of the cost of the publication. This is exactly the opposite case where now the institution doesn't pay any direct cost, but the authors do. This is a factor in their popularity I'm sure. Perhaps it would be in an institutions best interest to set aside a budget for researchers to pay for publishing in open access journals.

Let me give an example where the current model broke down. Nature publishing group, who publish such original titles as "Nature" and "Nature Physics" have been gouging the UC for a long time for rights to access their online content. A few years ago they tried to dig deeper and massively upped the cost to the school. The UC couldn't afford it, so they had to drop access. This was done partially as leverage to make them drop their cost, and partially because it's California and we're poor right now. The way they increased their leverage was by enacting a UC wide boycott of Nature journals. They've since made nice and Nature made some concession. It helps when some of the most powerful scientists in the world are within your institution. This only seems to happen in extreme situations. Perhaps it should happen more often.
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Adam Schwartzberg

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So I was reading Roger Ebert's latest blog post (http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2011/12/_where_i_stand_on_the_occupy_m.html) on the occupy movement, and this got me thinking:

"My hesitation all along has come with uneasiness about the Occupy tactics. The idea of physically occupying public spaces--parks, plazas, malls and so on--is a questionable strategy."

I agree with him that physically taking over a place for an extended period of time is difficult, and probably non-tenable for the long haul. The reason that this has become necessary, though, is that the tactics of the 60's, so radical and shocking to the establishment at the time, have become standard operating procedure. Durring the Bush years, how many marches were there? How many people held signs outside the white house? No one cares about this any more.

The occupy movement has forced the government to look at, and listen to, the people. Police have been called on to push back the protesters, and in doing so, they have given the movement weight, and power. This never would have happened if occupy was a 9-5 gig, or a march, or a 24 hour sit in.

As horrible as the violence against the protesters has been, it is often the violent response of the government that causes the wide spread disgust and anger that produces change. Of course, this is the great power of non-violence. I am extremely proud of the occupy protesters for their incredible commitment to non-violence in the face of such adversity.
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Adam Schwartzberg

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Devo humor is my favorite!
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Adam Schwartzberg

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I beg of you, if you are interested in science (or aren't, but wonder why people are), watch this interview by Stephen Colbert of Neil DeGrasse Tyson:

http://www.haydenplanetarium.org/tyson/watch/2010/01/29/stephen-colbert-interview-montclair-kimberley-academy

It's long, so if you don't want to watch the whole thing, at least watch from the 40 minute to the 50 minute mark.

This guy is truly inspiring.
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Adam Schwartzberg

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Anyone see Idiocracy? Does this remind you of that at all?

https://www.orderforeverlazy.com/

I think I'm going to get a few pairs of these for work.
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I love the commercials suggesting clear thinking adults would be proud to wear these to football games and while tailgating
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Adam Schwartzberg

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I just saw the new Muppet Movie. The Muppets are still awesome!
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People
Have him in circles
1,262 people
Work
Occupation
Staff Scientist in Physical Chemistry
Employment
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Lab
    Staff Engineer, 2011 - present
  • Sandia National Laboratory
    Staff Scientist, 2010 - 2011
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Labs
    Postdoctoral Researcher in Physical Chemistry, 2008 - 2010
  • University of California, Berkeley
  • University of California, Santa Cruz
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Oakland, CA
Previously
Albany, CA - Santa Cruz, CA
Story
Bragging rights
Survived a PhD in Chemistry, a postdoc at UC Berkeley, and one at Lawrence Berkeley National labs, and finally got a real job.
Education
  • University of California, Berkeley
  • University of California, Santa Cruz
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Gender
Male