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"Heaven is Real": I will respond to this amazing Newsweek cover story by the end of the day: http://bit.ly/QCvB5C
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I think you forgot the quotes around amazing.  At least I heard your voice in my head read it that way.  :)
 
We can tell it's real because he says it is.  Well...it doesn't get more persuasive than that...
 
So that time I dreamed I went to school but forgot to wear my pants, I guess that was also real?
 
Unfortunately this is not surprising to anyone who spends anytime working with M.D.'s. An uncomfortably large number of them are ignorant when it comes to science, despite the public's perception that medicine is science-based. Science is actually a relative newcomer to medicine (which most docs seem to prefer calling an art). Yet despite that, many M.D.'s remain absolutely confident (you're taught to act this way in medical school) no matter how little facts you have or how unsure you are about anything.
 
Brain dysfunction = evidence. I once discovered while tripping on salvia that I'm actually an infinite fractal array of cacti, no joke.
 
There are many ways to explain such an "experience". What proves that this (whatever "this" is) happened while his brain was shut down ? Even ordinary dreams can mess up our perception of time, and make us believe we saw an external event coming, even if in reality the dreamed cause was in fact constructed by the brain after the effect it had just witnessed.
I don't see any news-worthy claim in his account to make it worthwhile even to talk about it in great length.
 
Yawn. Yet another near-death experience.
 
Too bad he didn't have a full-death experience. Could've saved us all some time. (Joking) 
 
Awesome!! I read this an I thought 'pssh, Sam ought to respond to this and kill this hokum'
 
It's more likely that he made it all up... just like religion, come up with a story about heaven, throw in words like god or any other unbelievable concept and some people will inevitably fall for it. I don't blame the guy, though. His hospital bill must be quite high and he had to come up with a way to pay for it.
 
Interesting but there is a problem (at least): that does not mean that the entities that Dr. saw/experienced correspond to the God/Jesus/Holy Spirit/Mary of the Christian faith. It could be another 'god' just revealing Himself through NDE.
In fact in the Gospels, very little is said about the afterlife.
 
Excellent! I read this tripe before, and I'd love to see a Sam Harris rebuttal.
 
" According to current medical understanding of the brain and mind, there is absolutely no way that I could have experienced even a dim and limited consciousness during my time in the coma, much less the hyper-vivid and completely coherent odyssey I underwent."
The operative and pivotal statement in his entire article. We currently don't understand how this could happen. And we also currently don't understand how gravity works, but that doesn't invalidate it. 
I call hokum.
 
+Ricardo O Meh, I'm not going to call the guy a liar. It's pretty likely that early religious founders really saw what they claimed to have seen too - under the influence of hallucinogenic drugs, seizures, fasting, meditation and sensory deprivation, etc (there are lots of ways to get high and see things that aren't there). The main thing is that regardless of whether they experienced what they claimed from their own subjective perspective, it's not evidence of anything.
 
Peter Pan is real because I say I've experience it...
 
+Antalgic Gait : you took the words right out of my mouth! Neurosurgeons are doctors that are specialized in how to fix specific things that go wrong in the brain; they are in no way experts in the actual functioning of the brain as a whole or how the brain gives rise to the mind. I wish more people realized this kind of thing.
 
He learned all this amazing stuff but doesn't bother trying to say what it was. I'm sure we just wouldnt understand.
 
+Jeff Weiss well you know, one of the funny things about profound psychotropic experiences is that they can invest in their subjects a deep sense of meaning and enlightenment while being completely free of content.
 
Yeah, and look at the messages he got:

“You are loved and cherished, dearly, forever.”
“You have nothing to fear.”
“There is nothing you can do wrong.”

WTF? I would rather hear something like:

"Don't go to the ATM at 10:32 p.m. on September 23, 2017. You would get mugged."
"Your mechanic is ripping you off. Here's a better one."
"Here is the proof for Goldbach's Conjecture..."
"Dig in these coordinates to find fossils of rabbits in the Precambrian."
 
Well obviously God wouldn't tell him where to find fossils since he only put them there in the first place to test our faith, and this man has no need of faith any longer : )
 
'...the cover alone reveals the abasement and desperation of our journalism, the intellectual bankruptcy and resultant tenacity of faith-based religion, and our ubiquitous confusion about the nature of scientific authority." Yup.
 
actually nothing to comment, but probably - a good stuff for psychology of religion study (even m'not sure ;-)
"Credo quia absurdum"
 
+Justen Robertson Sure, I'd give the guy the benefit of doubt on whether or not his experience was "real". But, still as you say, one's own experience is no evidence at all. I was making the analogy with religions/cults as the myth behind them is so convoluted and surreal that its hard, at least for me, to trust that it all came from own experience on whatever level of consciousness... At some point, they all have to make some stuff up to try to fill in the blanks.
 
There's no doubt said doctor is at least partially brain-dead now.
 
I completely agree with your rebuttal. It's like every time anyone with half an intellect has an experience they can't quite explain they use the blunt object of religion (usually Christian) to put it into context. I can tell you.. from someone who has experienced Salvia Divinorum that all sorts of images, concepts, sounds, lights, colours and shapes start to form once you cross that divide. (DMT, Iawasca, Psilocybin etc will do the trick also).
 
If your evidence is subjective, it's not evidence.
 
but, i bet he sells a lot of books to the religiously afflicted
 
Read the book lacks any scientific credibility.
 
I would like to know what Sam Harris thinks about spiritism as defined in Allan Kardec books. That doctrine is gaining more and more followers in Brazil. They claim that the spiritism is based on reason.
 
Ahh c'mon...do you really think that Anykne sensible is going to get into a dialog over an 18th century person who believed in ghosts, and spirits. There are a thousand fools like this, selling to thousands of equally deluded fools.
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