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A.Z. Foreman
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Voices of Earlier English: John Donne's Will
The Will John Donne Before I sigh my last gaspe, let me breath, Great love, some Legacies; here I bequeath Mine eyes to Argus, if mine eyes can see; If they be blinde, then, Love, I give them thee; My tongue to Fame; t'Embassadours mine eares, To women or t...
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Written On Somebody's Napkin
Mad paper, go, and on the firewood burn Spew these rough lines out in a cough of smoke. I've had enough of you. We can't return To this. Destruction is the masterstroke. As ink turns ash, and words turn not a thing, Affirm what blowhard poets liked to doubt...
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Voices of Earlier English: Milton's Special Pleading
This seems like a good one to illustrate the sound effects of Renaissance English poetry that may be rendered inaudible in modern accents. Audio recording in a reconstruction of a somewhat conservative early-to-mid 17th century London accent On his Doore Wh...
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Slauerhoff: Comfort in Illness (From Dutch)
Comfort in Illness By Jan Slauerhoff Translated by A.Z. Foreman Pizarro at age fifty still had not  Gained much fame from the dangers of his life. With plumes decking the hair of his first wife, A second tended to his family plot.  They knew him as a madcap...
Slauerhoff: Comfort in Illness (From Dutch)
Slauerhoff: Comfort in Illness (From Dutch)
poemsintranslation.blogspot.com
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Slauerhoff: Letters at Sea (From Dutch)
Letters at Sea By Jan Slauerhoff Translated by A.Z. Foreman They're read and re-read in repeated anguish  Even though their contents were already known, Made of the same stuff of life in every language, Worn down to the last word in the long run. Yet, opene...
Slauerhoff: Letters at Sea (From Dutch)
Slauerhoff: Letters at Sea (From Dutch)
poemsintranslation.blogspot.com
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Voices of Earlier English: Drayton's Lunacy
Me reading in a reconstruction of London English ca. 1600 Me reading in my natural accent On His Lunacy Michael Drayton As other men, so I my selfe do muse Why in this sorte I wrest invention so, And why these giddy metaphors I use, Leaving the path the gre...
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The Historical English R
The history of English R in the prestige London dialect suggests a long period in which the trill/tap was (probably depending on the speaker?) in complementary distribution, free variation or outright competition with an alveolar approximant. Quoth Ben Jons...
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Voices of Earlier English: Mark Twain on Party Unity
An attempted impersonation of what Mark Twain's reading voice may have sounded like. Notable features of northern area of Missouri along the Mississippi river in the 19th century include the merry—Murray merger, an early tendency to push cardinal /æ/ even f...
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Voices of Earlier English: MacBeth's Hallucination
Macbeth's hallucination in London English ca. 1600 Is this a Dagger, which I see before me, The Handle toward my Hand? Come, let me clutch thee: I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not fatall Vision, sensible To feeling, as to sight? or art ...
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Voices of Earlier English: Now Is The Summer Of Gloucester's Discontent
One more Elizabethan English Shakespearean reading. Now is the winter of our discontent, Made glorious summer by this sonne of Yorke: And all the cloudes that lowrd upon our house, In the deepe bosome of the Ocean buried. Now are our browes bound with victo...
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