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Resource Employment Solutions
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Know How to Bridge Cultural Differences | When you do business with people from another culture, your success depends on bridging cultural differences. This means clearly understanding how cultures differ. For example, assess whether you’re working in an individual or collective culture: Do they identify themselves primarily as independent operators or as members of a larger group? For an individualistic culture you’ll want to acknowledge people’s quantifiable results. In primarily collective cultures, you’ll want to focus on the team as a whole and speak to the group’s achievements. | Adapted from “Bridging Two Kinds of Cultural Differences,” by B. McGarvie
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Leaders Win Trust by Not Hiding Their Doubt | Leaders have been trained to hide vulnerabilities, to minimize risk, and to be consistent, level-headed, and in complete control at all times. But it’s impossible to trust someone who is always rational, serious, and in control. If you want to win trust, you need to have the courage to present yourself as a more complex human being. This means becoming comfortable with expressing doubt. Smart leaders know there is more than one right answer, and so even after they commit, they’re not afraid to revisit and change course if necessary. | Adapted from “Leaders Win Trust When They Show a Bit of Humanity” by T. Leberecht
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Make Gender Balance a Smart Strategic Goal | If you are working on launching or accelerating a push for more gender balance in your company, you need to focus on the opportunity and not the problem. Approach the conversation by first laying out a set of future objectives, targets, and milestones. Then describe how gender balance is a key lever to help you reach those goals. And make sure to engage with managers so they understand the company’s goals. Remember: the final goal isn't just about balance. It's having more engaged employees and more connected customers. | Adapted from "Tackle Bias in Your Company Without Making People Defensive" by A. Wittenberg-Cox
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Get Your Employees on Board with New Technologies | Bringing new tech and tools into your organization can increase productivity, boost sales, and help you make better, faster decisions. But getting every employee on board is often a challenge. Put forth a compelling vision for what the technology is and what it's going to do. The best argument for a new technology is that it will make your life better. After pointing out the benefits, you can focus on training employees. And lead by example - show that you're investing time in learning the new system and empathize with your team. | Adapted from "Convincing Skeptical Employees" by R. Knight

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Don’t Overlook Long-Tenured Employees | Somewhere along the way, workers can lose the motivation to make a difference and create value for employers. That’s why the employees with the longest tenures in a company are also the least likely to be engaged. Retaining long-tenured, highly capable employees might be challenging, but minimizing their turnover is more practical than churning through new hires. Plus, experience is a strong driver of performance. Make sure managers are helping them find ways to do more of what they’re good at and giving them more autonomy and the ability to learn new skills. | Adapted from “Engage Your Long-Time Employees” by J. Harter
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Encourage More Debate at Work | One of the myths about “great workplaces" is that conflict is rare. But research reveals that disagreements actually fuel better performance. While personality clashes or differences in values can indeed be detrimental, conflicts that center on how work is performed can produce better decisions and stronger financial outcomes. Healthy debate encourages group members to think more deeply, scrutinize alternatives, and avoid premature consensus. The experience of open deliberation can actually energize employees by providing them with better strategies for doing their job. | Adapted from “5 Myths of Great Workplaces” by R. Friedman
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Stop Putting Off Your Toughest Tasks | We often procrastinate when there’s too much to do, we dislike a task, or we don’t know where to start. If you figure out which of these is blocking you, you can determine next steps and get it over with. Some tips can help you get ahead: 1) Set deadlines: slot tasks into your calendar so you don’t end up saving everything until the last minute; 2) Reward yourself: take a coffee break or go talk to a colleague once you’ve finished a particularly dreaded task. 3) Get help: if the problem at the outset is that you don’t know how to start the project, work with a colleague who can help. | Adapted from Getting Work Done (HBR)
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Effective Coaching Requires the Right Approach | Coaching can create problems because it is often imposed rather than invited. When we feel something is being imposed on us — even if it’s for our own good — our natural reaction is to resist. So if you’re trying to help someone change, your first consideration must be to approach them in a way that enhances, rather than dampens, their motivation. Your job is to help people uncover motives they already have, so they’re more inclined to take action. If you think of your coaching conversations as interviews instead of sermons, you’ll be far more successful. | Adapted from “You Might Be the Reason...” by J. Grenny
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Train Employees on How to Handle Abusive Customers | Sometimes the customer is not always right. Certain customers — whether they’re unforgiving, obnoxious, or overly needy — can hurt employee morale, put a company’s reputation at risk, and prove too costly. It’s important to clearly define your non-ideal customer, and then train your employees on how to deal with them, so they are not left to improvise. If they’re operating under the cliché of “the customer is king”, then pleasing every whim can end up hurting your bottom line. Provide support by establishing a process for how to respond. | Adapted from “When and Why to Part Ways with a Customer” by L. Arussy
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Help Remote Workers Feel Like Part of the Team | The biggest misconception about managing dispersed teams is that it requires a totally different skill set. While remote workers do present unique challenges, managers shouldn’t think about them in a fundamentally different way. It’s still necessary to set expectations for how interactions will take place, but it’s even more critical to establish clear lines of accountability. Set monthly, quarterly, and yearly performance goals and create a regular schedule to check progress. Remote workers need to know that they’re not being treated differently. | Adapted from “How to Manage Remote Direct Reports” by R. Knight
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