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Bob Hearn
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333 followers
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OK -- now this is really impressive, and surprising.
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Things are getting more interesting. Before, the OPERA team claimed to be seeing neutrinos arrive 60 nanoseconds before light would - but the machine at CERN was making pulses of neutrinos that lasted longer than that, so the whole experiment was dangerously tricky. Now they're making pulses as short as 3 nanosecond long pulses, and the OPERA teams still sees them arriving 60 nanoseconds early.

There are, however, still other sources of error to worry about, which Tomasso - the author of this blog - describes. So, despite his triple exclamation mark, he still thinks an error will be found.

I hope so, because I don't want to lose my bet with +Frederik De Roo! But of course it would be cool if a cherished law of physics were overthrown this way.
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It's been a bad month for computer science. Now we have lost Steve Jobs, Dennis Ritchie, and, today, John McCarthy, inventor of LISP and co-founder of the field of artificial intelligence. I was lucky to have several fun arguments with him about AI.

I was enamored of LISP very early -- I wrote a LISP interpreter in BASIC for my Apple II around 1980.
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If I put Wheeler & Zurek next to MTW, do I get a quantum theory of gravity?
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Steve Jobs narrated the first "Think Different" TV commercial (the version that never aired) back in 1997, before Richard Dreyfuss was brought in for the final version. I'm sure many others have or will post this link as well, but it is a great way to remember Steve because back in the Homebrew Computer Club days with Steve and Woz showing off the Apple I, I don't have any videos -- just lots of fond memories of all those times long ago.

We'll all remember Steve, but also must think of his family and their loss. Grief is very difficult, and those who have not experienced a close loss don't have a clue how difficult. My condolences to the family.
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Awwwww. This looks pretty convincing. Still, the actual Gran Sasso results have to be explained somehow.
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I find it fascinating that something we believed unquestioningly -- that nothing can go faster than light -- now seems likely to be up in the air for a few years. What will this do to how we look at the world? What will it do to physics research?

"[Fermilab's] first task will be to update a 2007 search for faster-than-light neutrinos, which didn't throw up anything statistically significant, using more recent data. That could be completed in six months ... Meanwhile, the next incarnation, MINOS Plus, will have new GPS sensors, atomic clocks and detectors to record neutrino arrival time with a precision of 2 nanoseconds. This could deliver results as early as 2014."
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