Profile cover photo
Profile photo
San Diego County Roofing, Inc.
33 followers
33 followers
About
San Diego County Roofing, Inc.'s posts

Post has attachment
At San Diego County Roofing, we install quality clay tile roofs that can last a lifetime.
Photo

Post has attachment
San Diego County Roofing installs beautiful asphalt shingle roofs in a variety of styles and colors.
Photo

Post has attachment
San Diego County Roofing performs quality repairs on commercial and residential properties.
Photo

Post has attachment
San Diego County Roofing specializes in energy efficient commercial roofing installations.
Photo

Post has attachment
At San Diego County Roofing we perform Roof Inspections and Roof Certifications.
Photo

Post has attachment
When you hire San Diego County Roofing, you deal directly with the owner through the entire process.
Photo

Post has attachment
Should you Repair or Replace your Roof?

Are you ready to invest in a new roof? Trying to decide if it’s time for a complete replacement or simply a repair is a big project in and of itself!  However, a good contractor with the right expertise will be able to expertly guide you through the process with a thorough inspection and suggest how to proceed based on their knowledge, your roof’s current state and your individual needs.  Whether you have a few curling shingles and merely need a patch up or your contractor finds serious damage and feels it’s time for your roof to be totally replaced, make sure your contractor is appropriately licensed and insured.

Remember, you have quite bit at stake when you hire someone to repair or replace your roof. Hiring someone with the right experience and skill along with the correct licensing and insurance could be the difference between a beautiful new or repaired roof that will last, or a big headache and a huge amount of money that could be lost.

Here are some things you should think about when talking with a contractor about whether or not your roof should be repaired or replaced.

•  How has the weather been? It might seem like a rhetorical or unrelated question, but discussing the different weather conditions put upon your roof from extreme heat and sun to wind and rain can help you clarify what condition your roof is truly in.

•  What does your ceiling look like? That’s right, your indoor ceiling. Flaking or discolored stains and paint on the ceiling and upper walls of your home might mean roof replacement. That said, a small roof leak does not mean you need the whole roof replaced. A good contractor will be able to explain whether or not that small leak is a sign that the roof is falling apart or in need of repair.

•  Is the cost of maintaining your roof exceeding the cost of replacing it? All roofs require a bit of maintenance from gutter cleaning to small shingle repairs, but if you’ve got major repair issues that amount to $2,000 here, $3,000 there in the course of a year and your contractor wants to charge you thousands more for a repair, replacing may save you money in the long-run.

•  How old is your roof? If your shingles are over 20 years old, they probably need to be replaced. A roof that is less than 15 years old might be repairable – however, if a wide span of your shingles are battered, curled, missing or torn, you will most likely be in need of a replacement.

•  What’s the span of damage across the whole roof area? Most contractors will suggest replacing if the damage is more than 25 to 30 percent of the roof.

•  Are you thinking of selling? A new roof will increase the value of your home, while a roof that has been repaired could just be money out of your pocket with no valuable increase in equity.

•  How many shingle layers does your roof currently have? Building code allows a maximum of two layers of shingles on houses. If you are hoping to repair your curly shingles with another layer but you already have two layers on your roof, you are going to need to replace.

Other considerations might also involve your roof deck, or the underside and supports of your roof and gutter system. If your roof deck or gutter system is rotting, then shingling won’t solve your problem. Roof deck damage is usually a sign of extensive roof damage and when your roof is replaced, you will receive a new roof deck and a new gutter system as well.

Keep in mind that even the best roof in the world will eventually need to be replaced, but replacing your roof too quickly or on the flip side, too late, can mean you’re wasting money either way. Timing is everything when it comes to your roof, especially when it comes to roof care.

To find out more about repairing or replacing your roof, please contact us at http://www.sandiegocountyroofing.com/Contact_Us.html 

Post has attachment
The Importance of Preventative Roof Maintenance

The Roof/ Gutter System is arguably the single most important system responsible for the protection of a home from water damage. Many homeowners, unfortunately, never realize this glaring fact until it’s too late; what could have been avoided by periodic maintenance turns into an escalating nightmare of drips, dollar signs and hand ringing uncertainty. More than likely you have invested a considerable amount of time and money in your home. So, having peace of mind is definitely desirable over a false sense of security. In other words, knowing that you have a roof and gutters on your house is a far cry from knowing whether the roof/ gutter system is functioning properly. The information provided here shall help homeowners to better understand the importance of how a home’s roof/ gutter system, together, can be maintained for proper functionality.

Annual roof and gutter inspection is an important piece in this equation. Always have a qualified roofing inspector evaluate the condition of your roof to assess the need for cleaning. This would include such items as; over-all condition, walk-ability, cleanliness, missing shingles etc.
Note: A qualified inspector would find such deficits at this time and make recommendations as necessary.

Debris removal is key for a few reasons and may be required on an annual basis (if not more often). Accumulation of organic materials (leaves, pine cones etc.) may lead to: moisture trapping, debris stacking, algae and fungus growth and can present a trip/ slip hazard to anyone whom accesses the roof. Moreover, any debris, which falls or is blown onto a roof, may eventually wind up in the gutter system. So, it’s important to keep in mind that just because the roof is clear of debris, doesn’t mean the same could be said about the gutters. The slope of your roof may be enough to keep the roof relatively clear, but that may be because it’s made its way into the gutters and is potentially leading to clogging the downspouts. Water which backs up due to a clogged downspout will eventually seep under the flashing at the back side of the gutter, which will lead to water damage/ dry rot of the roofs’ wood decking and fascia board. Water may also spill over the front side of the gutters, causing erosion of the foundation and flooding of the basement. Worse yet, the water may back up into the structure, leading to rot and infestations of wood-destroying insects and interior paint damage. So, remember to take a peek in the gutters at least twice a year, or have a qualified agency do this for you as a measure of precaution.

Trimming overhanging branches can be of benefit for a couple of reasons. Firstly, by minimizing the amount of shaded area on a roof, one effectively lessens the possibility of moss and algae growth. These two organisms are most abundant in moist, dank and dark areas. This is especially important on any north-facing roof (Northern Hemisphere only) as the sun shines on the south side of the roof, leaving the north side potentially shaded to begin with.  The second primary benefit is to remove any means of small animals accessing the roof.  Small animals, such as squirrels and other rodents, have a tendency to gnaw/chew on wood structures, which may lead to degradation of the roof.  
Note: This work should only be done by a qualified individual and according to city code requirement(s).

The average cost of a roof nationwide is on the order of $12,000-$18,000, whereas the average annual cost to maintain a roof is under $300 in most cases. So, it’s easy to see the importance of a preventive maintenance program, which includes the roof and gutter system. This is one sure-fire way to get the most life out of your roof and the greatest real peace of mind.

In conclusion, remember to always have this work done by a qualified professional and never take unnecessary risks. Falls from heights above 10 feet are the number one cause of death around the home.

To find out more about Preventative Roof Maintenance, please contact us at http://www.sandiegocountyroofing.com/Contact_Us.html

Post has attachment
Photo

Post has attachment
The importance of proper roof ventilation.

Few things are more misunderstood about the home than attic ventilation. In essence, all ventilation is about circulating air to keep it fresh and to reduce moisture levels. The American Institute of Architects estimates that 90 percent of homes in the U.S. have unacceptably high levels of moisture. Understanding whether your home could benefit from some form of attic ventilation might just be, if not a life-saver, a roof-saver. 

Attic ventilation is an important tool in the creation of optimal environmental conditions in any residence or structure. Properly venting the attic space helps ensure a healthier environment as well as conserve energy. Attic ventilation may also play an important role in prolonging the life of your roof.

Ventilation requires the free flow of air, which may be achieved through the use of different methods and products. A proper roof ventilation system encourages superior air movement by exhausting air from the upper eave vents (exhaust) causing a natural vacuum effect that draws air in through the lower vents (intake).

Having roof vents doesn’t necessarily have to take away from the looks of your roof. Products such as O’Hagin Roof Vents (www.ohagin.com) offer a highly functional product line that makes no or very little noticeable change to the appearance of your roof.

When it comes time to determine the number of roof vents needed for your house, there is an online calculator available at http://www.ohagin.com/calculator.asp . The two formulas used to determine the number of vents needed are referred to as either the 1/150 (tile 24 compliant) or 1/300 (California Building Code compliant). These methods dictate that one (1) square foot of ventilation is provided for every 150 or 300 square feet of attic floor space. Compliance with attic ventilation code requirements should always be verified at the local governing level before performing the calculations.

To find out more about properly ventilating your existing or new roof, please contact us at http://www.sandiegocountyroofing.com/Contact_Us.html .
Wait while more posts are being loaded