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Alan Light
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+Amelior Scout

https://thelibertarianrepublic.com/us-co2-emissions-plummet-under-trump-while-the-rest-of-the-world-emits-more/

Of course the article is rather partisan, but it is interesting that in the face of reduced carbon dioxide emissions, environmentalists want to fight back.
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Voter fraud in Texas. They were being paid by someone.

Very difficult to prove - how extensive is voter fraud?

https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/4-Indicted-in-North-Texas-Voter-Fraud-Scheme-497239441.html
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Good read.

In defense of the social scientists, it must be hard to think straight when the cognitive dissonance is so deafening. They know that their policies are right, and their studies should validate this, yet the data just won’t cooperate. So the claims take on the character of “fake but accurate” reporting, or of the dirty cop who plants a murder weapon on someone he’s sure is guilty. The problem, as these examples indicate, is not just that it’s wrong, but that such behavior tends to catch up with you.

https://www.nationalreview.com/magazine/2018/10/29/climate-change-data-environmentalists-denial/
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I've been saying this for many years.

Conservatives have been saying something like it for years.

Bush 2 ran on privatizing just a portion of social security, and when he failed to get it on his first attempt, by just a couple votes, gave up. That's a chief reason I hold him in low regard. It made it clear that he didn't really give a damn about the principles he espoused.

This account doesn't even take into consideration that the people paying the most in tend to live shorter lives, and therefore collect less in benefits.

And don't think for a moment that people in government don't know all this. They count on it.
The Social Security Administration's own numbers reveal that a private investment pays more than Social Security.

by Tom Eddlem

Back in 2011, investment guru Warren Buffett famously complained in the New York Times that his secretaries were paying higher federal payroll tax rates than he was:

Our leaders have asked for 'shared sacrifice.' But when they did the asking, they spared me.... what I paid was only 17.4 percent of my taxable income – and that’s actually a lower percentage than was paid by any of the other 20 people in our office. Their tax burdens ranged from 33 percent to 41 percent and averaged 36 percent.”

Buffett used some creative accounting for his numbers; he used only “taxable income,” which means he didn't count all the deductions his employees were using to write off their income taxes. For middle-class workers making about $75,000 per year, that's typically a heavy percentage of their income. Moreover, for the tax rates Buffett claimed applied to his assistants, they must have been paid in the range of $200,000 per year or more.

Despite Buffett's accounting trickery, there was a level of truth to his complaint: the burden of Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes does fall almost exclusively upon the poor and middle classes. And Buffett acknowledged this fact in his New York Times op-ed:

The mega-rich pay income taxes at a rate of 15 percent on most of their earnings but pay practically nothing in payroll taxes. It’s a different story for the middle class: typically, they fall into the 15 percent and 25 percent income tax brackets, and then are hit with heavy payroll taxes to boot.”

The Questionable Benefit of Paying Those Heavy Taxes

Buffett was correct to claim the poor and middle class pay heavy payroll taxes for the Social Security program. But do the poor and middle classes receive benefits from Social Security compared to the “investment” the federal government requires they make?

The Social Security Administration's website now allows its “customers” to enter income numbers over a career and pull out a precise benefit level. So it's relatively easy today for anyone to contrast private investments with Social Security benefit levels with an unprecedented level of precision. (This author has run the numbers several times before in the past few decades using the SSA's PIA calculator application.)

In every conceivable scenario, the private fund pays more than Social Security to the minimum wage worker.

While it has long been known that middle class and wealthy people do not profit by “investing” their money in Social Security compared with a private retirement fund, the impact of Social Security upon a worker trapped in a minimum wage job throughout his career has been left uncalculated – until now. Thus, the following question can be answered authoritatively:

Is it possible for a minimum wage worker to do better putting his money into Social Security than if he were allowed to invest his money in a private fund earning interest at the same rate as the S&P 500?

And the answer is this: No, it's not possible. In every conceivable scenario, the private fund pays more than Social Security to the minimum wage worker.
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Whatever one might think about the excessive number of pronouns some demand, no one should lose their job for defending themself from a bully.

However, I'm not sure the Lowe's deserves an employee that is so well-liked by co-workers. Perhaps there is a Home Depot in the area that needs a good employee.

https://www.change.org/p/lowe-s-rehire-catherine-boudreau-and-stand-up-to-bullies
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The Ocean Cleanup - launch of the first system to clean up the Pacific garbage patch. Interview with Boyan Slat.
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A documentary on how China is trying to deal with its waste.

Waste is a huge problem everywhere, but the developing world particularly needs solutions soon.
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Fasting appears to cure diabetes in some patients.
Planned intermittent fasting may help reverse type 2 diabetes, suggest doctors

Planned intermittent fasting may help to reverse type 2 diabetes, suggest doctors after three patients in their care, who did this, were able to cut out the need for insulin treatment altogether.
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Turns out the boxer Muhammad Ali threw away his birth name, as he had been named after a famous abolitionist who persuaded Abraham Lincoln to end slavery, and took the names of two white slave owners who owned black slaves.

https://powr.com/video/how-muhammad-ali-was-deceived-by-islam-3678266
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