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Clayton Haapala
Works at Dell Compellent
Attended Carleton College, Eastern Michigan U
Lives in Minnetonka, MN
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Clayton Haapala

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I had hit most of these, but this is a good summary. 
Windows 10 is the most cloud-oriented version of Windows to date—yet, while this means you get some nifty new features, it also means some of your personal data is being shared with Microsoft's servers. Don't Miss: 45+ Tips & Tricks You Need to Know for Windows 10 In general, Microsoft has proven to be a fairly trustworthy company when it comes to utilizing your data in order to streamline services like Cortana, but an excerpt from their privacy ...
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Rare bipartisanship, even then.
 
[MN] "That landmark legislation deserves commemoration on its 50th anniversary next week, as do the lawmakers whose votes made it happen. That included all eight Minnesota members of the U.S. House — four Republicans and four Democrats — and both Minnesotans in the U.S. Senate. Their show of bipartisan unanimity was rare, even in that less-polarized era. It’s a point of pride for this state, then and now." #votingrightsact  
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not quite the books I would pick, but ok. sigh, "jonathan strange & mr. norrell" is still in a "to be read soon" pile. all the ones past 1984 never made it into any of the piles.
Science fiction and fantasy offer a rich legacy of great books—but that abundant pile of reading material can also be daunting. So sometimes, it’s easier to fake it. We asked some of our favorite writers, and they told us the 10 books that everyone pretends to have read. And why you should actually read them.
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Clayton Haapala

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Everybody sing it now!
 
Happy Lawsuit To You!
Happy Lawsuit To You!
This Song Is Public Domain,
Happy Lawsuit To You!

(To the tune of Good Morning To You)
—Cowards Anonymous
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Clayton Haapala

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Windows 10: A Potential Privacy Mess, and Worse

http://lauren.vortex.com/archive/001115.html

I had originally been considering accepting Microsoft's offer of a free upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10. After all, reports have suggested that it's a much more usable system than Windows 8/8.1 -- but of course in keeping with the "every other MS release of Windows is a dog" history, that's a pretty low bar.

However, it appears that MS has significantly botched their deployment of Windows 10. I suppose we shouldn't be surprised, even though hope springs eternal.

Since there are so many issues involved, and MS is very aggressively pushing this upgrade, I'm going to run through key points here quickly, and reference other sites' pages that can give you more information right now.

But here's my executive summary: You may want to think twice, or three times, or many more times, about whether or not you wish to accept the Windows 10 free upgrade on your existing Windows 7 or 8/8.1 system.

Microsoft is thrusting out this update via a little white Windows icon that you will probably see soon (if you haven't already) on your task bar. There are some users in some situations who will not receive this notification, but most of us will. This icon leads to MS' colorful spiel for why you want to install the free Win10 upgrade.

First things first. It's obvious from my email today that this icon and MS pitch alone are confusing many users. They've never seen anything like this appear before and many think it's a virus or that their system has been otherwise compromised.

In fact, this notification is triggered by a Windows Update that MS slipped into their update stream some time ago, which the vast majority of users probably accepted without realizing what it was. 

If you decide you do not wish to upgrade to Win10 now, you may want to get rid of that notification. MS doesn't tell you how (surprise!) and the procedure can range from relatively simple to "a real mess" depending on your situation, but a good discussion of the procedures and provisos is at:

http://www.howtogeek.com/218856/how-do-you-disable-the-get-windows-10-icon-shown-in-the-notification-tray/

Many users -- especially on somewhat under-powered systems -- may find Win10 to be a painfully slow experience compared with Win7, irrespective of MS' claims.

Worse, some functionalities important to many users are missing. If you use Windows Media Center -- that's gone from Win10. DVD playback is currently problematic. 

And here's a biggy. If you don't want Microsoft installing updates automatically -- if you're a user who has chosen to take control of this process up to now -- you probably will hate Win10.

Users with Home versions of Win10 will be required to accept automatic updates, including drivers. 

In some environments, this is unacceptable from a support and security standpoint, and reports are already coming in regarding driver related issues.

It's fair to say that in the general case, automatic updates are usually a win from a security and reliability standpoint. But Windows is significantly unique. Because Windows runs on such an enormously wide range of hardware and configurations (compared for example to Chrome OS on Chromebooks) the ways for automatic updates to cause problems for Windows users are dramatically numerous as well. Definitely an important issue to consider.

You may have heard concerns about the sharing of Wi-Fi passwords by Win10. This is largely not a problem in practice, given the details of the implementation.

But Win10 still looks like it could be a privacy quagmire.

The details are buried down in the new Win10 privacy policy/user agreement, but the bottom line is that by default Win10 will be sending a lot of your data from your computer to Microsoft that they never had access to before. 

You can read an analysis of this here:

http://thenextweb.com/microsoft/2015/07/29/wind-nos/

As is the case with automatic updates, there is nothing inherently wrong with cloud data syncing, and it can bring significant service and reliability enhancements to users (keeping in mind how infrequently most people properly backup their systems).

But if you're going to avail yourself of such cloud data services, you really need to trust the firm you're dealing with, across the scope of possible data-related aspects.

And to be completely honest about this, I personally simply do not trust Microsoft to the degree that would seem necessary to use the default data sharing settings that Microsoft really, really, really wants you to use -- and of course that the vast majority of users will blithely accept. To put it another way, in this context I trust Microsoft about as far as I could throw a heavy old steel-cased 1980s PC.

Being careful with your data isn't just a Microsoft thing. My views of Microsoft and Google are pretty much diametrically opposed -- I have enormous faith in Google and Googlers doing the right thing with respect to protecting the data I share with them, but even in the case of Google -- with whom I share a great deal of data -- I'm selective about what I do share.

That's just common sense no matter whom you're dealing with, whether individuals, corporations, or other organizations.

The upshot of all this is that while we can all agree that "free" is often good, there's a lot to think about before accepting Microsoft's heavily promoted upgrade to Windows 10, and we all need to approach this decision with our eyes very wide open, indeed.

Be seeing you.

-- Lauren --
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Tom Brusehaver's profile photo
 
Why do people still use windows. It has been a mere for decades
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Clayton Haapala

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Up North, here, we emphasize the first syllable of Imp-ala and refer to it as a "Finnish Cadillac". 
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Clayton Haapala

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Words don't even...
 
When the moon kisses the sea. I wish I knew who took this shot. It's glorious. Google Image Search didn't help this time.
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Good timing.
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A fundamental principle of good engineering is that you design the whole system to function well, not just the part you're concentrating on. Most systems include humans as components -- as operators, maintainers, passengers, or even obstacles. And when you fail to take that seriously into account in your design, you make a fundamental design error which can have lethal consequences.

It appears that the cause of the SpaceShipTwo crash was precisely of this sort: the designers never considered the possibility that a particular switch might be flipped at an incorrect time. In this case, it was flipped only a few seconds too soon, at a speed of Mach 0.8 instead of Mach 1.4. (This under rocket power, where acceleration is fast) That caused the tail system to unlock too soon, be ripped free by acceleration, and destroy the spacecraft, killing the co-pilot and severely injuring the pilot.

Scaled Composites' design philosophy of "relying on human skill instead of computers" here reeks of test pilots' overconfidence: the pilots are so good that they would never make a mistake. But at these speeds, under these g-forces, under these stresses, and tested repeatedly, it's never hard for an error to happen.

There are a few design principles which apply here.

(1) It should not be easy to do something catastrophic. There are only a few circumstances under which it is safe for the feathers to unlock, for example, and those are easy to detect based on the flight profile; at any other time, the system should refuse to unlock them unless the operator gives a confirmatory "yes, I really mean that" signal.

(2) Mechanical tasks that can lead to disaster are a bad idea. Humans have limited bandwidth to process things: while our brain's vision center is enormously powerful, our conscious mind's ability to think through things works at language speed, a few ideas per second. Here, time was wasted with a human having to perform a basically mechanical task of unlocking a switch at a particular, precise time. This requires the human to pay attention, time something accurately, and flip a switch, at a time that they should be simply watching out for emergencies. Since the time of unlock is already known long before takeoff, a better design would be for the unlock to happen automatically at the right time -- unless the risks from having an automatic unlocker (perhaps due to a reliability issue, or having a complex part prone to failure) exceed the benefits of removing it.

What's important to learn from this accident is that this error isn't specific to that one mechanism: this is an approach which needs to be taken across the entire design of the system. Every single potential or scheduled human action needs to be reviewed in this way.

An excellent perspective on this comes from James Mahaffey's book Atomic Accidents, a catalogue of things that have gone horribly wrong. In the analysis, you see repeatedly that once designs progressed beyond the initial experimental "you're doing WHAT?!" stage, almost all accidents come from humans pushing the wrong button at the wrong time. 

Generally, good practice looks like:

(A) Have clear status indicators so that a human can tell, at a glance, the current status of the system, and if anything is in an anomalous state.

(B) Have "deep status" indicators that let a human understand the full state of some part of the system, so that if something is registering an anomaly, they can figure out what it is.

(C) Have a system of manual controls for the components. Then look at the flows of operation, and when there is a sequence which can be automated, build an automation system on top of those manual controls. (So that if automation fails or is incorrect for any reason, you can switch back to manual behavior) 

(D) The system's general behavior should be "run yourself on an autonomous schedule. When it looks like the situation may be going beyond the system's abilities to deal with on its own -- e.g., an anomaly whose mitigation isn't something that's been automated -- alert a human."

The job of humans is then to sit there and pay attention, both for any time when the system calls for help, and for any sign that the system may need to call for help and not realize it.

This wasn't about a lack of a backup system: this was about a fundamentally improper view of humans as a component of a crtiical system.
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Clayton Haapala

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Windows 10 upgrade successful. Buh-bye, Win 8.

If you upgrade, have an ethernet connection handy. It wants to finish with some on-line stuff, and your wifi may not be available.

My wifi connection could not be established until I finished the setup with a wired connection and then retried the wifi.
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worked great for me 
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Clayton Haapala

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The Dems blame Bush, the Repubs blame Obama. The both are wrong.
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291 people
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Work
Occupation
Software Developer
Employment
  • Dell Compellent
    Storage Development Principal Engineer, 2012 - present
  • Symantec Corporation
    Software Developer, 2004 - 2012
  • Cisco, WAM!NET, Network Systems, LaserMaster
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Minnetonka, MN
Previously
Babbitt, MN - Ann Arbor, MI - New Richmond, WI
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Tagline
Software development, IPv6, bass (guitar and vocals), Lutheran. Enjoys the road less traveled, on foot or bicycle.
Introduction
I am from Babbitt, MN (near Ely and the Boundary Waters). Since de-Ranged, and living in the Twin Cities.
I've worked in the computer field, usually networking, for 30+ years, currently with Dell Compellent.
I sing bass in my church choir and have sung with Exultate Chamber Choir and Orchestra.  I also play bass guitar when I get a chance.

Bragging rights
I have getaddrinfo() and I'm not afraid to use it.
Collections Clayton is following
Education
  • Carleton College, Eastern Michigan U
    History
  • J.F. K High School, Babbitt, MN
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Clayton Haapala's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Stephen Colbert schooled Fox News hard: Comedy, Bill O’Reilly and the ex...
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The comedian's hyper-patriotic persona was the key to parodying blathering know-nothings like Fox's Bill O'Reilly

When an extremist Christian fundamentalist got to run a whole state
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Kansas is the new battleground for the soul of the GOP. Sam Brownback's term as senator should be a cautionary tale

SwiftKey Keyboard
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SWIFTKEY - THE MIND-READING KEYBOARD No.1 best-selling app in 58 Google Play countries, over 300,000 ***** reviews “Shockingly accurate, mak

Tim Cook Soundly Rejects Politics of the NCPPR, Suggests Group Sell Appl...
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In an emotional response to the National Center for Public Policy Research (NCPPR), Apple CEO Tim Cook soundly rejected the politics of the

Economist Mark Zandi on Default: "we will be dooming our economy and the...
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In response to a Sarah Palin comment, the prominent economist who advised John McCain's 2008 campaign makes a dire prediction.

Full Remote Device Lockdown Is Now Live In The Android Device Manager, I...
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In our recent APK/website teardown, we unearthed Android's upcoming remote device lock functionality through Google Play Services, and now i

The $200K lesson I learned from getting shot
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How a health insurance check sent 6 hours before being shot saved my life. And what it means for you (and America)

Diane Ravitch: School privatization is a hoax, “reformers” aim to destro...
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Our public schools aren't in decline. And "reformers" with wild promises don't care about education — just profits

Detaining my partner: a failed attempt at intimidation
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The detention of my partner, David Miranda, by UK authorities will have the opposite effect of the one intended

Lauren Weinstein's Blog: "How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the NSA"
lauren.vortex.com

Once upon a time, I knew a spy. He died long ago, and honestly I don't even remember his name -- or at least the name by which I knew him. H

HammerHeart Brewing Opens - Minnesota Beer Activists
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The HammerHeart Brewing opens Friday, August 2nd, at 4pm.

Minnesota Beer Activists
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Raise Your Glass & Raise Your Voice!

The unlikely hero: Thank you, James Sensenbrenner
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Wisconsin Republican becomes unlikely champion of voting rights, stepping up to his own party's shameful leadership

From the mouths of babes: Toddlers' speech is far more advanced than pre...
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The sound of small children chattering away as they learn to talk has always been considered cute -- but not particularly sophisticated. How

Patrick Stewart Gives Passionate Response to Question At Comicpalooza 2013
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This was my question to Sir Patrick Stewart at Comicpalooza 2013. I wanted to thank Patrick Stewart for his speech at Amnesty International

George Takei Responds To "Traditional" Marriage Fans
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The legendary George Takei responds in the best way possible to the protesters who gathered during March Prop 8/DOMA hearings outside the Su

Flow Frenzy
market.android.com

Connect your way through 150 levels in this delicious and addictive puzzle. This is the beta of our new free game Flow Frenzy - feedback is

Real Piano
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★★★★★ Real Piano ★★★★★Real Piano - Finger Piano to AndroidThe most fun experience in finger piano to Android! Digital Piano with Grand Piano

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Surprise twofer on beer! Fish tacos and steak quesadilla were good. Nice waiter.
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Really wanted to like this place, and I would try it again if I lived here. Couldn't taste the hazelnut in our cappuccinos, which also were very "wet".
Food: GoodDecor: GoodService: Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Sadly, it closed in August.
Quality: Very GoodAppeal: Very GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
We just ordered spring rolls and wok, yellow curry, and pad Thai dishes for take out. All excellent! Why haven't we tried Thai Table, before now? This location has turned over several times in the past decade, but I wish this owner continued success. We'll be back. I requested medium spicy, and found that quite tasty.
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
8 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Look no further. Great coffees and sandwiches. Fills that great empty spot between Eau Claire and Madison.
Quality: ExcellentAppeal: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Largest airline in the world, or close to it, and all it's gates are at the end of Concourses. #delta
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Nice place, but almost $50 for two burgers and three short beers?
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago