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Our fantastic new branding, courtesy of Littlefish Creative! 
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CHARITY SPRING FAYRE ON THE COMYN THIS SATURDAY

A FREE charity spring fayre is being held on Leamington’s Newbold Comyn to raise money for a Coventry hospice which provides care for terminally ill babies.

Staff at The Newbold Comyn Arms are hosting the event, which has been organised by Media Beard, a digital marketing and social media agency from Warwick, on Saturday May 17 to raise money for Zoe’s Place Baby Hospice, which was started by John Scarisbrick, father of the pub’s owner Sarah Miller.

The event runs from 11am until 3pm and there will be approximately 20 stalls, including five selling vintage clothing, one giving away free comic books, and others concentrating on balloon art, face-painting, bespoke jewellery, caricature art, cards and crafts, decorated glassware, candles, perfumes and cosmetics, free art classes for children, delicious cakes and more. The Newbold Comyn Arms will be putting on a BBQ and selling pulled pork batches, sharing platters, tea, coffee and drinks as well as offering free giveaways.

“It’s obviously a charity very close to my heart, and we’ve raised thousands of pounds for them in the past,” said Sarah. “We would do anything we can to support these little babies and their families.”
Stallholders can still purchase a table for £15 to display and sell their items, email info@newboldcomynarms.co.uk for more information. Stallholders keep their profits but all monies raised for the table cost will be donated to the hospice.

CAPTION: All the fun of the fayre with (left to right) Newbold Comyn Arms’ Sarah Miller, Edward Ellis from Elysium Comics and Jessica Mallorie from Art Group Studios.
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Merry Christmas from all of us at Newsline! x
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Little Chloe Buckland has lived up to her ‘young buck’ name by becoming the winner of Hatton Christmas Facebook competition to name the new reindeer born at the adventure farm earlier this year. As a result, the five-year-old who came up with the name Rodney for the young buck, was the first to meet Father Christmas at the Hatton Adventure Farm last weekend.

She, and hundreds of other children met up with Rodney – who will be helping out at the real life nativity this year – as well as receiving this year’s first gift from Santa on Saturday.

This is one of the busiest times of the year at the farm near Warwick and the new-look Hatton Shopping Village is also launching its Christmas Shopping Festival after the destination attraction underwent an extensive makeover by a team of architects earlier in the year. (Read more:
http://www.edgemagazine.org/move-rudolph-rodney-reindeer-come-hatton.html) #christmas #hattoncountryworld #warwickshire #shopping #competition #pr #publicrelations  
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How a Woman's Movement Influenced 'The Woman's Movement'-

Coventry’s bicycle industry was as influential to women’s emancipation as the mini-skirt. New Herbert fashion exhibition – Keeping Up Appearances – highlights what women wore throughout the two world wars.

It was not just the upward mobility of hem lines that defined the women’s movement – Coventry’s 19th Century bicycle industry was possibly as influential in female emancipation as the mini-skirt, according to a new exhibition opening at the city’s Herbert Museum next week.

As Downton Abbey graces our screens next weekend, visitors can discover the historic link between women’s clothing and their roles in society at the Herbert Art Gallery & Museum’s new exhibition, Keeping Up Appearances: Fashion Through Two World Wars.
From garments with restrictive corsets to free-flowing fabrics and higher hems, the event defines the wardrobes of Coventry women – across the classes and the decades.

Although no bicycles are present in the exhibition, its iconic influence on the City through manufacturers including Hillman is conspicious leading to greater mobility and more liberating clothing that got women out of the home and into the saddle.

From glamorous gowns to practical overalls, this exhibition showcases what women wore from the 1900s to the 1950s, and why they wore these garments.

During this time, the roles and status of women changed more rapidly than in any other period in history. Before the First World War, middle class women were expected to run the home, often with the help of a servant. Many women worked until they married, as domestic servants, teachers, nurses and in emerging roles such as typists and telephonists. However by 1917 many British women were contributing to the war effort by working in munitions factories or as bus or tram conductors, farm labourers, nurses and secretaries.

Between the wars women tried to free themselves from the horrors of war, escaping to lively dance halls and the glamour of Hollywood films. Alongside the beautiful and daring dresses worn by some in the 1920s and 30s however, many other women had to dress much more practically, as they continued to work and run the home.

By the Second World War, many women in Coventry were called up to National Service. Some worked in the British Motor Industry as it started to mass produce aircraft engines, military vehicles and weapons. Other women’s roles included air raid wardens and joining the Women’s Royal Air Force where they worked as aircraft mechanics – themes picked up in the parallel exhibition: The War Effort, running at Coventry Transport Museum, which is also free to visit.

These dramatic changes from housewife to the Home Front are reflected in the original garments that will be on display in the Keeping Up Appearances exhibition, most of which are part of the Herbert’s collection. Follow the story of women’s history through evening gowns, day-dresses, work-wear, underwear and accessories, and see period photographs of real women wearing clothes from the period. The exhibition includes a sash which belonged to a Coventry born Suffragette, and a local woman’s air raid warden’s outfit.
Ali Wells, Keeper of Collections at the Herbert and curater of the exhibition, said:

“We are very pleased to be mounting this very special display, especially as our last clothing exhibition proved to be extremely popular. Many people are fascinated both by the history of women’s fashions and the changes in styles, but also what this tells us about how women lived their lives. Partly thanks to TV dramas such as Downton Abbey and Call the Midwife, interest in historical clothing is enjoying a resurgence. At the Herbert we are really fortunate to have a large collection of period costume, including outfits worn and loved by Coventry women through the ages. Using items from this collection, as well as key loans from local museums, we’ve put together a truly unique and compelling exhibition. We are confident that people will enjoy ‘Keeping Up Appearances’ as much as we have enjoyed putting it together!”

A range of inspiring events related to the Keeping Up Appearances exhibition have also been planned, including a Swinging Belles life drawing workshop, curator talks, and ‘Wartime Sundays’.

Keeping Up Appearances: Fashion Through Two World Wars at the Herbert Art Gallery & Museum runs from Saturday 21 September 2013 to Sunday 5 January 2014.

For more information about the exhibition and related events, please visit www.theherbert.org


#blog #coventry #woman #women #womensfashion   #fashion #events #news #pr #downtonabbey #herbertmuseum
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