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Dave Taht
Works at Bufferbloat.net
Attended University of USENET
Lived in Santa Cruz, Ca
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Dave Taht

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We covered a lot of ground in our discussion here, including the vw scandal, "closed source" vs "open source" vs "public source", the router security problems at epidemic levels across the internet - as well as the solved   #bufferbloat  problem, the abuse of the DMCA by vw and others - and a huge array of other issues that Vint Cerf, Jim Gettys, Linus Torvalds, Eric Raymond, Dave Reed, Sascha Meinrath and 260+ other famous engineers and scientists have attempted to solve in putting a new plan in front of government and the FCC, for solving the problems inherent in IoT and #wifi .

Our press release is here: businesswire.com/news/home/20151014005564/en/Global-Internet-Experts-Reveal-Plan-Secure-Reliable

Our  letter to the FCC: fqcodel.bufferbloat.net/~d/fcc_saner_software_practices.pdf
 
Here's #vuc563  audio recording
The panel discussion with +Dave Taht, +Jim Gettys, +Paul Vixie, +Lauren Weinstein, +Corrado Mella, +Keith Milner, +Loganaden Velvindron (live from Mauritius with not that much latency!) and +Elektra Wagenrad who drifted in to make the most concise statement of the evening!

You can watch the video on http://vuc.me/2015/vuc563-the-fcc-vs-open-firmware/
Very good discussion with people on three continents, reflections on open source, security, code, privacy and so much more. Watch video on Youtube on voipusers channel.
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Nearly forgot to mention +Dan York,  Ray Ramadorai and +Loganaden Velvindron. We must try this again soon, so many interesting points came out of it.
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Dave Taht

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Yesterday's Trouble with the TPP post examined some of the uncertainty created by the surprising e-commerce provision that involves restrictions on source code disclosures. KEI notes that governments have not been shy about requiring source code disclosures in other contexts, such as competition worries. Yet this rule will establish new restrictions, creating concerns about the implications in areas such as privacy. For example, security and Inte...
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A colleague at the GTA Linux User Group last night pointed out that the TPP's Investor-state dispute settlement scheme can also be used by a proprietary software vendor (eg, MS) who is being displaced by open source to sue the companies and government mandating programs meet a standard.  To be fair, the same thing could happen to a proprietary vendor that meets  required standards that MS does not.
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Awesome!
 
This is big.   Google is bringing back end-to-end (now called peer-to-peer) just like we used to have in the good old days before NAT killed it.   I assume IPv6 is the key.   Google has a surprisingly large number of customers that are fully IPv6 capable.
Direct audio and video chats come to Hangouts on Android.
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Well, the original Skype was able to deal just fine with NAT and end to end, even mesh.
 - Until MS bought it and killed the mesh (decentralized) structure
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Dave Taht

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My neighbor in the San Francisco mission district is looking to rent her furnished 3 bedroom 1.5 bath top floor apartment month to month - http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sfc/apa/5432058854.html
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Dave Taht

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Today I went to frys to refresh my hardware. I knew that the tp-link
archer C5 was "good", so I got one... opened the box... only to find
that it was a C5 v2 (only noted on the router itself), which is a
complete swap-out from the well supported-by-openwrt atheros mips
chipset to a broadcom and totally-unsupported by openwrt arm one.

https://wiki.openwrt.org/toh/tp-link/archer-c5-c7-wdr7500

If porshe completely swapped out the engine and all the electronics
from model year to model year, and switched from diesel to gas, they'd
at least somehow, make clear that "stuff had changed under the hood".

Somehow, this awful habit of the home router industry has gotta change.

 While I look forward to benchmarking a "new" product with it's
default firmware, it was not my intent to support in any way yet
another model change of this sort. To add even more insult to
injury... this ostensibly "new" product is running kernel 2.6.36.4
according to their GPL drop.
Dual Band (concurrent) and Gigabit Ethernet. Advertised as 1750 Mbps. It has simultaneous Triple-Stream (3x3) radios on both 2.4GHz and 5 GHz Bands. It supports 802.11n in 2.4GHz for 450Mbps throughput and IEEE 802.11ac (draft) for 1300Mbps throughput in 5GHz. Note: The editing history for this ...
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OK let's think this way: the FCC wants to open the cable box industry, but you +Dave Taht​ spent some time trying to get them to open firmware of routers to end users. Was that effort aas successful? What lobbying do we need to get the FCC to see this in the correct light?
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Dave Taht

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Ahh... #ipv6  . Isn't it great we have 2^64 addresses per subnet to hide our routers in now?

traceroute6 -n www.lwn.net

 3  2001:558:6045:bd::1  14.561 ms  11.815 ms  13.715 ms
 4  2001:558:82:2118::1  31.034 ms  16.677 ms  21.285 ms
 5  2001:558:80:41f::1  36.471 ms  17.139 ms  12.648 ms
 6  2001:558:0:f697::1  13.861 ms  14.855 ms  20.278 ms
 7  2001:558:0:f5e7::2  14.897 ms  16.606 ms  15.079 ms
 8  2001:558:0:f575::2  33.108 ms  13.628 ms  23.005 ms
 9  2001:470:0:31f::1  37.126 ms  35.687 ms  14.584 ms
10  2001:470:0:36d::2  79.434 ms  79.02 ms  78.988 ms
11  2001:470:0:259::2  90.998 ms  95.183 ms  123.785 ms
12  2001:504:1::a506:3949:1  79.323 ms  79.554 ms  78.863 ms
13  2600:3c03:6666:3::2  94.228 ms  95.968 ms  93.747 ms
14  2600:3c03::f03c:91ff:fe61:5c5b  82.273 ms  80.88 ms  80.93 ms
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In my case my ipv6 interior routers generally did not have public ipv6 addresses at all, relying on the fe80 addrs and a routing protocol, and announcing a ra'd slaac-created dns server address. Having some sort of perimeter from a few billion devices for this stuff seemed desirable, even if it was 2^64-2 levels of security via obscurity (same reason for which I am down on dhcpv6 internally)

But the world moves towards memorable addresses externally (which I'm ok with). 
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I keep hoping that with higher levels of awareness of how badly #wifi can suck that perhaps we'll see more focus on fixing it and #bufferbloat  . http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2499016,00.asp
Don't feel bad if the Wi-Fi at your house sucks: Even the President deals with a spotty connection.
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Are you talking about network internals here, like too many devices in a GSM/UMTS/LTE cell? Or are you talking about wired-internet? In the latter case the lines are not over-booked*) in any meaningful sense, but DTAG uses congested "peerings" to subtly convince content providers to buy direkt connections to the DTAG eye-balls. This is a somewhat tricky balancing act, as peerings need to be good enough for current customers to not change ISPs in droves while also congested enough that content providers feel inclined to improve the quality of their offerings to their customers inside of DTAG's network.

*) In some oder ATM-based access networks there seems to be congestion already between DSLAM and further aggregation network, so there the lines are certainly over-booked, but with ATM going the way of the dodo (or Raphus cucullatus for the ornithologically inclined) soon that specific issue should solve itself...
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Dave Taht

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Among other things, like compromised routers - the criminals used the dastardly CRON scheduler to make their heists. 

https://threatpost.com/spree-of-bank-robberies-show-cybercriminals-borrowing-from-apt-attacks/116173/
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+Paul Vixie, yeah, spam would also be hard to send without nameservers. Such dedicated criminal activity should not go unacknowledged!
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Dave Taht

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Gihub appears to be jumping the shark. Ah, well, it was good while it lasted. http://www.businessinsider.com/github-the-full-inside-story-2016-2
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It's the potential private key leakage that concerned me. http://www.computerworld.com/article/3023298/security/openssh-patches-leak-that-could-expose-private-ssh-keys.html

In contrast to erik, I did use several keys (now recycled), that were multi-use, on sites like github. 
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remarkable man
 
#BAMF for #BlackHistoryMonth  Now THIS is a cat I'd love to see a biopic about!

From Wikipedia: As a politician, Smalls authored state legislation providing for South Carolina to have the first free and compulsory public school system in the United States, and founded the Republican Party of South Carolina.
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Dave Taht

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Over the last month I have gradually got off of all the mailing lists I was on, in the hope that I would find concentration and inspiration on the one big project (make-wifi-fast) I have in front of me.  I did splurge and get back on one list that was always interesting and always inspirational to me - the arocket mailing list - where enthusiasts talk about space stuff all the time. This afternoon, the immortal Henry Spencer wrote this:
 
"I have a talk I sometimes give, "Computing Before Computers".  The last substantive slide is what I introduce as "the tombstone of pre-computer computing":  the HP-35.

In 1970, Bill Hewlett of Hewlett-Packard decided he wanted a pocket scientific calculator.  A few small outfits had built such things before; they hadn't sold well (partly because their math functions often were inaccurate).  Hewlett's previous personal project had been a scientific desk calculator, which had sold much better than his marketing department had predicted.  Now he wanted the same thing, pocket-sized.  The marketing department studied the potential market carefully and decided it would lose money.  Hewlett again overruled them; what's more, he rammed it through as a crash project under his personal control.

It came out in 1972.  It did everything a slide rule did, and a lot more. Its math functions were exemplary, better than the ones on most computers then.  It was built like a tank, almost indestructible.  And it sold for a price individuals could afford, with a bit of effort.  Altogether, it was much better than it rationally had to be, because Hewlett insisted.

Sales started out brisk, and then went exponential -- literally.  HP couldn't add new production lines fast enough.  They had the market to themselves for about a year, before stunned competitors managed to come out with equivalents.  HP was a big company, making hefty computers and expensive test equipment.  By the end of that year, the HP-35 -- one of the cheapest things they sold -- was 25% of their total revenue.  It was mostly profit, because expanding volume had driven costs down rapidly. And all the major slide-rule manufacturers were abandoning the business, because suddenly nobody was buying their products any more.

That's what can happen when the boss gets it right, and as John said, "builds what other people didn't know they were going to want".'
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Cheerleader. Gimme an I! Gimmie a n! Gimmie a T! Gimmie a E! Gimmie an R! Gimmie a N! Gimmie a E! Gimmie a T! What's that spell?
Employment
  • Bufferbloat.net
    Fugi Chef, 2011 - present
  • Teklibre.com
    CEO, 2007 - 2010
  • MontaVista
    Member, Visionary Staff, 2000 - 2003
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
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Santa Cruz, Ca - San Juan Del Sur, Nicaragua - Denver, CO - Ft Lauderdale, FL - Ft Myers, FL - Ocean City, NJ - Paris, France
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singer, pianist, guitarist, writer, experimenter, theorist, hacker, maker, faker - in no particular order, on any given day. And I also write code.
Introduction
I used to be just a geek. Then I sold my house, left my cubicle, and travelled around the world, trying never to touch a computer, but observe how they were used, and how much better we could use them... now I'm still travelling, and still without a home - but trying once again to help hold up the sky, and finish what I helped start, so long ago.
Bragging rights
can surf big waves and fix big problems, and when I can't do either, can 'tom sawyer' others into thinking that they can do the same, and exceed their own limits.
Education
  • University of USENET
    Study of Everything, 1983 - 1993
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"md"