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HORTICULTURE
Dr. Tina Marie Waliczek from the department of agriculture from Texas State University has done a fascinating study showing that live plants have an effect of people's attitude in their workplace and also purifies the air. Dr. Waliczek has conducted many studies based off of NASA's study on plants that purify the air. Unlike NASA's study, Dr. Waliczek was actually able to focus on the idea that live plants create better moods for people while at work. Waliczek conducted research and surveys of people's attitude toward their workplace. She found that there were dramatic results between people who had offices with outdoor viewing such as windows and those that are set in cubicles with absolutely no view of the outside. To this, she decided to see how people's work place changed with live plants in the cubicles. Of course there were positive results. This article interested me because I have taken a plant science class where we had a guest speaker present on this very subject, but instead, on the effects of healing sick people. The whole article can be found below. I believe this can be a great article to use in an agricultural classroom because it is really relevant and students will find it very interesting. The fact that plants can serve as an aesthetic is quite amazing.

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1. NPR -- "Alabama farmers are facing a labor crisis because of the state's new immigration law as both legal and undocumented migrant workers have fled the state since the strict new rules went into effect last month.

In Baldwin County on the Gulf Coast, strawberry planting season is just a few weeks away. Farmers are wondering if they'll have the crews to get the plants in the ground.

Alabama Agriculture Commissioner John McMillan says there's no doubt the immigration law has left farmers in a lurch. He says they're concerned about where the labor is going to come from since legal immigrants are leaving along with the illegal ones."

2. SEATTLE TIMES - "One after another, at a recent emergency meeting called by the Governor's Office, Washington fruit growers talked about how hard it's been to find workers as the harvest hits its sweet spot. Apples alone are a $1.5 billion-a-year business in the state.

And two weeks ago Gov. Chris Gregoire amped up what now has become an almost annual harvest-time refrain by growers when she declared the state's farm-labor shortage a crisis.

Growers mostly blame rising tensions around illegal immigration that have spooked migrant farmworkers, the majority of whom are here illegally, while worker advocates say there'd be no shortage if growers were willing to pay workers more."

3. ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION -- "State officials have set their sights on another potential pool of workers to help bridge Georgia’s severe farm labor gap: prisoners."

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