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Ann Markström Ⓟ
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ROBODRINK: THE AUTOMATIC BARTENDER FROM TECHNION:

Technion students have developed ROBODRINK – a bartender that serves a variety of cocktails at the press of a button

"Three students from the Technion Faculty of Computer Sciences have developed ROBODRINK, a robot for mixing alcoholic beverages. The robot was designed by Michal Friedman, Yoav Mizrahi and Zorik Gechman as part of an Arduino systems programming course, under the guidance of Prof. Yossi Gil, tutorial teachers Boris van Sosin and Marina Minkin, and Dr. Nir Levy, academic relations director at Microsoft.

R-L: Michal Friedman, Yoav Mizrahi and Zorik Gechman
R-L: Michal Friedman, Yoav Mizrahi and Zorik Gechman
This is essentially an automatic bartender, explains Michal Friedman. “It can mix drinks from a built-in list and prepare cocktails based on personal preferences. We built a machine that has brackets for holding eight bottles. We programmed it to mix drinks using combinations from three bottles of juice and five alcoholic beverages. Users choose a cocktail from the menu in the application we developed. When a glass is put on the platform at the edge of the track, the robot prepares the drink within seconds, based on a precise recipe.”

“We built everything from scratch,” says Zorik Gechman. “This is a project that combines both hardware and software. We assembled the electronic components and built the electrical circuits. We wrote the software for an Arduino processor and developed and app that communicates with the robot via Bluetooth, based on recipes located on the cloud.”

“We very intensively worked on this project for three months,” adds Yoav Mizrahi. “We are software people, but in order to complete our project we taught ourselves how to build the robot. We read a lot on the Internet and overcame a great many challenges.”

During the process of building the robot the students consulted with experienced bartenders who advised them regarding the most common cocktails. “The bartenders we consulted were very enthusiastic and loved the robot idea,” says Michal. “They said they’d be very happy to install one in their bars.”

The Arduino systems programming course his held in conjunction with Microsoft R&D, and provides students with the opportunity to use innovative technologies and software during their studies, including smartphones and tablets for running their applications during the development stage. The course, which was designed to challenge the students in the independent construction of products, included the planning of smart systems that combine hardware and software on the Arduino platform."
Technion students have developed ROBODRINK – a bartender that serves a variety of cocktails at the press of a button. Three students from the Technion Faculty of Computer Sciences have developed ROBODRINK, a robot for mixing alcoholic beverages. The robot was designed by Michal Friedman, ...
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Ann Markström Ⓟ

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Panoramafriheten är hotad, vilket i praktiken innebär att dina privata semesterbilder inte får läggas ut i sociala medier. Det innebär även att Wikipedia inte får publicera bilder på offentliga platser. Läs mer här: http://www.svt.se/opinion/article3066972.svt

På onsdag kommer Nico Trinkhaus att överräcka en namninsamling i protest mot förslaget att inskränka panoramafriheten: https://www.change.org/p/european-parliament-save-the-freedom-of-photography-savefop-europarl-en/u/11276795 190000 namn har inkommit, och Nico skriver att du kan även påverka genom att maila dina EU-parlamentariker och säga att du inte vill se att den här förändringen genomförs.

Hjälp till och sprid detta vidare!
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From The Telegraph?????? Britain may not be a member of the Eurogroup, but it IS a member of the EU!!! This article reflects the opinions and the feelings of the ordinary British PEOPLE who THEMSELVES are demanding a BREXIT!!!!

Greece is a tiny little country fighting for DEMOCRACY, not just for ourselves, not just for Spain, Italy, Portugal! This fight is for the ENTIRE International Community. Our nations are being taken over by FASCIST Puppet governments!

We don't want your money or your financial support! But we desperately need your moral and ethical support! We need ALL your voices to be heard! DO SOMETHING! Petition your governments! Protest your EU branches and US embassies! DON'T JUST STAND BY AND WATCH, YOUR TURN IS COMING!!!!
The democracy that was born in Greece more than two millennia ago no longer applies when control over the currency and economic policy is handed to a supranational body
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IBM’s cognitive computing platform, which will give a “secure and open platform for physicians, researchers, insurers and companies focused on health and wellness solutions,” recently graduated from a research project for studying medicine holistically at its R&D lab in Haifa.

“Watson went to medical school, and now it’s set to graduate,” Dr Aya Soffer, director of big data and cognitive analytics at the Israel unit, told Times Of Israel. “We’ve had it study the medical literature, and now it’s ready to apply its natural language processing skills to real-life applications.”
IBM and partners use Israeli technology to transform personal health with Watson and open cloud.
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'We need to talk about this: If we are to live in a mass surveillance society (like it or not), it must be a somewhat relaxed, liberal and tolerant society.'

"Laws are the tools politicians (and bureaucrats) use to force the people to behave in a certain way. And they have the police to enforce these laws.

In a democratic society it is essential that the laws are the same for all citizens, and applied in the same way for all. Regardless what these laws stipulate, regardless if they are “good” or “bad”. All people should have the same rights (and obligations).

This does not imply that all laws are good. There are plenty of really bad laws. Some are unfair, some are in conflict with fundamental human and civil rights, some are silly, some creates “crimes” without victims and some are plain stupid.

Most people break some laws, most of the time. There are simply too many laws for anyone to have a reasonable grasp of most of them. Some laws we break because we find them unimportant, silly or patronising. And some laws we should break, as they infringe on our fundamental rights.

Laws are always the footprint of the ruling political forces. We have all seen the Internet meme “Never forget that everything Hitler did in Germany was legal” (Martin Luther King, Jr.). The fact that something is legal is no guarantee that it is right or reasonable.

In a democratic system, the laws can even be used to undermine or nullify democracy itself. In a democratic, orderly way.

Enter: mass surveillance.

Mass surveillance gives the authorities a way to control that the people obey the laws. All the people. All the laws. All the time. Even really bad laws.

This will create a society where everyone must be looking over the shoulder. A society where you must be careful before you talk. An anxious society.

This might be a classic case of an unstoppable force meeting an immovable object.

We need to talk about this: If we are to live in a mass surveillance society (like it or not), it must be a somewhat relaxed, liberal and tolerant society.

To put it in different words: The ruling classes need to give the people some slack. If not, pressure and tensions will build in a dangerous way – when authorities can control almost everything we do.

But politicians do not abide by any live and let live principles. And they certainly do not plan ro roll back mass surveillance."

/ HAX
Laws are the tools politicians (and bureaucrats) use to force the people to behave in a certain way. And they have the police to enforce these laws. In a democratic society it is essential that the laws are the same for all citizens, and applied in the same way for all. Regardless what these laws stipulate, regardless if they are "good" or "bad". All people should have the same rights (and ...
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~'Musik i sommarkväll' i Norra Ny kyrka~

#ÖvreÄlvdal #KdStiftsInfo #svenskakyrkan #Värmland

"Jazziga toner"

Konsert med Johan Gund, piano, dragspel, gitarr, och Magnus Dölerud, saxofon, flöjt, klarinett, i Norra Ny kyrka tisdagen den 7 juli 2015 kl. 19:00.
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Museum of Greek Musical Instruments: A Worthy Stop for Music Lovers:

"If you’re looking for a different type of museum in Athens and enjoy music, look no further than the Museum of Greek Musical Instruments in Plaka. The museum and study center opened in 1991 and is devoted to the history of popular Greek music and folk instruments. It features more than 1200 instruments that were donated by Musicologist Roivos Anogianakis from his impressive private collection to the Greek State in 1978. It’s a Public Entity supervised by the Ministry of Culture and housed in an old mansion that was built in 1840.

Visitors can see and hear the influences on Greek music and how Greeks transformed Middle Eastern and European influences into something of their own. The museum traces the development of different styles of island music. Instruments dating from the 18th century including flutes, clarinets, bagpipes, drums, fiddles, violins, mandolins, bells, and water whistles are displayed on the 3 floors of the building. Recordings and headphones are available at every exhibit to hear the sounds that the instruments make. The displays also include costumes of the great masters of Greek music.

The basement level consists of a selection of church and livestock bells, water whistles, wooden clappers, and flutes. The ground floor displays wind instruments like the tsampouna, bagpipes made from goatskin. The first floor is a selection of string instruments such as the bouzouki, the santouri and the Cretan Iyra.

According to the Museum of Greek Musical Instruments website ( http://www.instruments-museum.gr/ ), the objectives of the Museum and Research Center, as mentioned in the founding law are:

1. The collection, conservation and exhibition of folk musical instruments and generally any material useful for research, study and promotion of Greek folk music tradition.

2. The promotion of research and study on ethnomusicology, and as documentation and dissemination of traditional music.

3. The rescue, study, promotion and dissemination of Greek folk and Byzantine music tradition, both in Greek and in the international arena by any appropriate means.

4. Creating special ethnomusicological library and audiovisual library.

The museum offers school tours and educational programs, seminars, lectures, and lessons. Programs are tailored to the age and interests of students. Occasionally, there are courtyard concert performances for visitors to enjoy in the summer. Admission to the museum is free."
The Museum of Greek Musical Instruments is devoted to the history of popular Greek music and folk instruments.
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Gästkolumn Anna E Nachman: 'Israel blev mitt andra hem'
  
"För judar i diasporan är Israel en försäkring, en fristad ifall hoten och våldet tilltar.

Men flera av mina lärare i skolan, till exempel min snälle SO-lärare, jämställde Israel med Nazi-Tyskland. Hans negativa bild bekräftas alltför ofta i media och av folk jag annars litar på. "Apartheidstaten Israel" har upprepats så ihärdigt att många tar det för sanning.

För drygt tre år sedan gick jag på samma tillställning som den israeliske man jag idag är gift med. Vi blev blixtförälskade och snart flyttade han in i min lilla tvåa med sina två kostymer och fyrahundra böcker. Jag hade två barn, han tre. Snabbt utökade vi skaran med två gemensamma. Så gick det till när Israel blev mitt andra hem och bilden jag serverats definitivt kom på skam.

Nu sitter jag här och dricker kaffe på svärmors balkong, en bit norr om Haifa. Hon som kom hit som barn på 30-talet och alltså blev palestinier innan hon blev israel, som gjorde lumpen 1948 och under kriget var en duktig krypskytt.

De yngsta barnbarnen tultar runt i huset, om en stund går vi till den arabiske bagaren på hörnet. Norr om oss närmar sig IS och i söder skjuter Hamas nästan dagligen raketer från Gaza rakt in i Israel. Vi är på en plats och i en tid där ingenting får tas för givet.

Jag älskar Israel, det är öststat och hi-tech i ett. Allt spirar grönt trots hettan och alla samsas så gott de kan: ryssar, etiopier, sekulära och ultraortodoxa, muslimer, kristna, beduiner, druser. Skyltarna är både på hebreiska, arabiska och engelska. Nyss avlöpte Pridefestivalen i Tel Aviv i glädje, inga vattenkanoner och gummikulor som i Turkiet. Det här är ett demokratiskt land med odemokratiska grannar.

En svensk nationalsport är att tycka synd om dem som man uppfattar som svagast. Men medlidande är en försåtlig form av förakt: man utser en grupp till offer (och därmed underställd en själv) och en annan till förövare. Det får svensken att känna godhet och engagemang medan han i verkligheten avhumaniserar båda grupperna. Israeler är onda, palestinier goda och Hamas är terrorister bara på grund av långvarigt förtryck.

Jag besökte Betlehem förra veckan, dit äger min man med sitt israeliska pass icke tillträde. I Palestina får judar inte bli medborgare, men det kallas ändå inte apartheid. En snabb summering av förra veckans terrordåd: en död i Frankrike, 25 i Kuwait, 38 i Tunisien, 146 i Kobane, Pride attackerat i Turkiet och en FN-byggnad bombad i Jemen. Och svenska utrikesdepartement protesterar mot - Israel. Detta för att någon gammal skorv med förnödenheter som man hade tillstånd att ta in landvägen tvingades vända utanför Gazas kust.

När IS för ett år sedan började såga av huvuden som inte tänkte exakt som deras fick många i väst en aha-upplevelse: Israels existens var inte Mellanösterns enda bekymmer. Några förstod att Israel, trots att det är ett ungt land med många problem, ändå förmedlar en skärv av sans i en sanslös omgivning, och måste försvaras.

Min "på plats-insyn" i Mellanösterns problematik har medfört en vaksammare blick. Vilken information sväljer jag själv med hull och hår? Jag tänker då och då på min SO-lärare. Hade han sett det jag ser och druckit några koppar kaffe med svärmor så tror jag att hans undervisning hade sett annorlunda ut."
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För judar i diasporan är Israel en försäkring, en fristad ifall hoten och våldet tilltar.
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Grexit fears may be taking a toll on stock and bond prices this month, but it has been a boon for virtual currency Bitcoin
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This Londoner is crowdfunding a Greek bailout fund: #CrowdfundGreece #Greek #Austerity #Solidarity #Bailout #Greece
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A big day for Dubray: ‘A bookshop in Bray? This is never going to work!’

As Dubray Books holds a literary evening to celebrate its rise from a small shop opened in 1972 to become Ireland’s largest dedicated bookseller, MD Maria Dickenson tells its story

Helen Clear, right, founded the business at 55 after rearing seven children. She and her husband Kevin sold the family home to finance it. She retired in 2005, aged 86. In 1988 the company was bought by her daughter Gemma Barry, left, and her husband Kevin, an economist with the Central Bank and NCB Stockbrokers:

'Book loving staff, enthusiastic customers, monthly recommendations, staff choices, bookclubs, and author signings and events: Dubray Books has grown over the last 40 years from a small bookshop in Bray to a group of eight dedicated stores for booklovers to escape to.

“A bookshop in Bray? This is never going to work!” Not encouraging words to owner Helen Clear from one of the first visitors to what became the first Dubray Books store. Originally named The Bray Bookshop, it opened in 1972 in a small premises on the Quinsboro Road and local customers still regularly regale us with their memories of that tiny shop. Helen, who founded the business at 55 after rearing seven children, came from a long line of strong business women and continued undeterred. Such was her enthusiasm for her new project that she and her husband Kevin sold the family home to finance it, and relocated to the Wicklow area.

Despite the doubts of the customer in question, the people of Bray have been good to Dubray Books. In speaking of that day, Helen wrote: “I was absolutely frightened out of my wits . . . on the morning we opened I got a great lift – Mrs Harvey, from the fish and vegetable shop, determined to be the first customer, arrived early and presented me with a bunch of flowers, wishing me success. It warmed my heart and lessened the terror.” Takings on day one were a princely £40.

The company has now served the Bray area for over 40 years, and expanded to seven other locations around the country. We are very proud of the strong links forged with our local communities and authors over the years. Early supporters included Marie and Seamus Heaney, Éamon de Buitléar, Diarmaid Ó Muirithe and Kate Cruise O’Brien. Helen is credited with introducing Joanna Trollope to the Irish market, enthusiastically hand-selling the author’s books to such a degree that the publisher was moved to bring her to Ireland for the first time.

Over the years, innumerable writers have enjoyed a warm welcome in various Dubray stores: Irish authors such as Edna O’Brien, Colum McCann, Colm Tóibín, Maeve Binchy and Derek Landy; as well as more international stars such as Michael Palin, David Attenborough, Nigella Lawson, Anita Roddick, Julia Donaldson and Stephenie Meyer, to name but a few. Last Christmas, both astronaut Chris Hadfield and Panti Bliss brought Grafton Street to a standstill, and tonight we will celebrate the talent of our Wicklow-based authors with a special evening at the Bray Main Street store, featuring Sebastian Barry, Paul Howard, Cathy Kelly, Audrey Magee, Emma Hannigan and many more.

To say that Dubray Books is a family business would be an understatement. In 1988 the company was bought by daughter Gemma and her husband Kevin, a highly respected economist with the Central Bank and NCB Stockbrokers. Gemma’s passion and flair for retail and Kevin’s financial acumen were the perfect complement to Helen’s book knowledge and the three built a strong business based on a shared love of books and exceptional customer service. The group became well known for its positive relationships with the wider trade, particularly with Irish publishers and representatives, who have provided great support to the business over the years. Helen continued to work in the business until 2005, quietly withdrawing from the shop floor that Christmas aged 86.

All of Helen’s six daughters have worked in the company at some stage. Maria managed the Grafton Street bookshop and still works in the Bray head office, while Olivia, former manager in Stillorgan, continues to have active input into the store. Since Kevin’s death in 2014, a loss which his colleagues and the trade feel very deeply, his sons Cormac and Eoghan have taken an active role in the business at board level. Helen’s granddaughter Emma has joined the team to buy book-related toys and gifts, and it is not unusual to find other relatives taking a short stint behind the counter at busy times of year.

As determined and ground-breaking as her mother before her, Gemma was the first woman (and the first Irish person) to chair the Council of the Booksellers Association of Great Britain & Ireland, and she and Helen were joint recipients of that same organisation’s Bookseller of the Year award in 1997, to be followed by our Grafton Street manager Lynn Crampton in 2012 and Susan Walsh, our marketing manager.

The chain grew in scope, first moving to larger premises on Bray’s Main Street, a development which doubled sales. In 1990, we opened The Dublin Bookshop on Grafton Street to great excitement and, with the launch of shops in Rathmines and Kilkenny in 1994, the group adopted the name Dubray Books – a word derived from the founding locations of Dublin and Bray. Further stores in Stillorgan, Galway’s Shop Street, Blackrock and Dún Laoghaire grew the business to become Ireland’s largest dedicated bookseller and, despite the recent challenges of the recession and the e-book phenomenon, it still retains that position.

A strong visual aesthetic is part of the Dubray history: Helen’s daughters having both talent and a good eye for matters artistic. Paula Clear ensured that Dubray Books was one of the first to introduce a collection of art cards to the stores, while Olivia made bookmarks to sell in the store.

Sharing our love of books:

Despite the growth of the group, our local ethos and core principles have remained unchanged. We work hard to develop our staff knowledge and we consciously recruit book lovers, who will take pleasure in sharing their enthusiasm with customers. Every bookseller undertakes an eighteen month training program and each is responsible for buying books for the store - the latter an unusual and time-consuming practice by current book retailing standards, but one that we feel is invaluable when it comes to providing a broad selection of books and allowing us to engage in a genuine way with our customers. A monthly recommendations leaflet packed with our buyers’ latest passions is an important part of the Dubray Books offer, and in the coming weeks we will be sharing our booksellers’ favourite books of all time – an impressive and much loved collection led by Harper Lee’s classic, To Kill a Mockingbird. Needless to say we can’t wait for the release of her new book, Go Set a Watchman.

The book trade has gone through many changes over the years. The removal of VAT from books in the 1980s provided a massive boost to the industry and made it viable, and the Celtic Tiger years saw major expansion. Recent years have brought challenges which still linger: the recession hit book sales just as Amazon grew in strength, and the growth of e-books, mercifully now abating, provided a very real threat to bricks and mortar retail. Legacy rental agreements led to the demise of a number of dedicated Irish independent bookstores and continue to cause difficulties for many.

Book buyers seek an enriched experience:

Looking to the future, we are working with customers and trade contacts to explore what motivates book buyers now that the rise of e-books has halted. The findings are rich: modern Irish book lovers increasingly seek personal recommendation and communication – having exhausted the novelty of auto-recommends from online retailers - and look forward to indulging in the pleasure and serendipity that a bookshop visit can bring. Book lovers are also keen to seek depth in their reading experiences: access to authors is ever more important, as evinced by the growth of book clubs literary festivals such as the upcoming Hay Festival Kells and Dalkey Book Festival. Range is making a comeback: the fiesta of celebrity autobiographies that characterised the boom years has subsided and readers now seek to discover something unusual, something special, something that reflects, affirms and extends their personal world view.

Hearteningly, our research has uncovered an undaunted appetite for reading, browsing and discovery among tech-savvy twentysomething “millenials”: the challenge for the trade is to provide an environment that provides them with the stimulation that they seek. Growth in the children’s market continues unabated and Dubray’s booksellers take particular pleasure in recommending books to younger customers and those who encourage them. Author Emma Hannigan, a Bray regular, remembers her sibling harbouring a childhood suspicion that Mrs Clear was in fact Enid Blyton, and customers frequently tell us that their reading lives began with a recommendation from Helen in those early days. If there is one sincere hope that springs from the company’s heritage it is that we can continue to inspire and encourage the reading experiences of customers new and old.

Dubray Books Bray’s local author evening takes place on Thursday June 11th, at 6.30pm, at 10 Main St, Bray, with Wicklow-based authors Sebastian Barry, Paul Howard, Cathy Kelly, Audrey Magee, Emma Hannigan and many more.'

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/a-big-day-for-dubray-a-bookshop-in-bray-this-is-never-going-to-work-1.2245785
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