Profile

Cover photo
Verified local business
Smart Language Solutions
Language School
Today Open 24 hours
6 followers|17,515 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

 
Four Top Number Tips.

The English language is full of small rules that most people, including many native speakers are not aware of.

One area that many people (including natives) make mistakes is the correct way to write and say numbers.

In our latest blog we will share with you 4 easy to remember rules that will help you write and speak your numbers correctly.
The full post, including the podcast and a fun quiz is on our website http://buff.ly/2hUVgO5

Remember after you have finished reading the blog, listening to the audio file and have completed the quiz you can practice what you have learnt with native speakers on our free to use Language Exchange Website.

buff.ly/2hUZeGd

#English #Grammar #Slang #Numbers #Podcast #Blog #Learn #Online #Language #Exchange #LanguageExchange
1
Add a comment...
 
We hope you are enjoying our free English lessons.

In this post will help you power up your knowledge of the FIVE uses of the Past Continuous.

Remember we are a Language Exchange website, a place where you can practice your second language for FREE in real time with our chat and video apps with native speakers from all over the world!

Go to our site smart language solutions (click on the SLS logo) and sign up today.

Now for the free lesson

English Grammar, The Past Continuous Tense

Improve your use and understanding of the past continuous tense with this free lesson from the language exchange website – Smart Language Solutions.

No matter how well you speak any language it is always a good idea to review the grammar rules to make sure that you are not making any errors.
That is why here at SmartLanguageSolution.com – The Language Exchange website – we have many posts to help you review your grammar skills.

What is the past continuous tense?
Like all continuous tenses, the past continuous (also called the past progressive in American English) is used to express the idea of an action in progress.
The past continuous has five distinct uses.

What is the first use of the past continuous?

The past continuous is used to describe an interrupted past action.

I was watching Netflix when my mother called.

John – “What were you doing when you broke your arm?”
Mary – “I was skiing in Italy”

When we use the past continuous to express an interrupted past action we have to use two actions and we must use two different tenses, the past continuous and the past simple.

For the rest of this lesson included the audio and free quiz click here: goo.gl/jiUehQ
English Grammar, The Past Continuous Tense | Language Exchange. Improve your use and understanding of the past continuous tense for FREE
1
Add a comment...
 
This week we continue to help you refresh your grammar knowledge, with a look at the present continuous tense.

Remember, after you have read this post you can improve your English for FREE on our language exchange website Smart Language Solutions.
Go to SmartLanguageSolutions.com to create an account and offer to help someone improve your native language for their English.

Now to our Present Continuous post.

No matter how well you speak any language it is always a good idea to review the grammar rules to make sure that you are not making any errors, that is why here at SmartLanguageSolutions.com, the language exchange website, we have many posts to help you review your grammar skills.

Remember when you have read this post you can practice what you have learnt with English speakers who want to exchange their language for your native language on our safe, secure and FREE language exchange website.

What is the present continuous tense?
Like all continuous tenses, the present continuous (also called the present progressive in American English) tense, is used to express the idea of action.
It is an easy tense to construct and it has six different uses.

What is the first use of the present continuous?
The present continuous is used to express an action happening at this moment in time.

• You are reading this text.
• I am writing this text at the moment.

What is the second use of present continuous?
The present continuous is used to express an action happening around now, but not at this moment in time.

Usually something that takes some time to complete.
• At the moment I am writing this blog, but I am also reading a great book! – I read the book each night before I go to sleep, but now I am in my office working.
• She is training to become a professional cyclist. – Every day she trains hard, but now it is the late at night and he is asleep.
When we use the present simple to express an action happening around now, our focus is on the activity not the fact.

What is the third use of present continuous?

Read the rest of this blog on our website and you will see the info graphics and can take the quiz to test what you have learnt.
Follow this link for more
http://smartlanguagesolutions.com/blog/2016/11/23/english-grammar-present-continuous-tense-language-exchange/
Improve your use of the English grammar present continuous tense, on the best language exchange website - Smart Language Solutions.
1
Add a comment...
 
Speak Slang Like a Native
"Ah here" an Irish Slang phrase.
Learn how to use, Ah here an Irish Slang phrase on the online language exchange website Smart Language Solutions.

Blog Reading Time: 10 minutes
Blog Level: Intermediate

Remember you can get the full interactive version of this blog on our website, including the free quiz to test what you have learnt at goo.gl/R5znU5

Here at Smart Language Solutions we love the way language evolves, and we think slang is the most interesting example of language evolution.

Is slang rude and/or vulgar?
Yes and no.
Of course some slang terms can be rude and vulgar, and some slang terms can be “clean”.

In fact even the rude and vulgar terms can be used in a manner that does not cause offense; a typical example is the “f” word.

In Britain this word is considered offensive by most people no matter the context.
However, just across the Irish Sea in Ireland the “f” word can be used in a non-vulgar manner, to the extent that you might hear it on talk radio at any time of the day.

Top Tip
If you want to improve your English we suggest the two following options, one choose an online language exchange site like ours.
On our site you can find online language exchange partners to practice your second language.
Two listen to online English language talk radio.
Before you tune into English language talk radio, you should note that some channels broadcast their content based on the political ideology (left or right) of the station owner.
Here are some stations you could listen to online:
RTE (Ireland)
Newstalk (Ireland)
Radio 5 Live (UK)
Radio 4 (UK)
LBC (UK)
NPR (USA)
ABC (Australia)
CBC (Canada)
You will find the links to these radio stations on our blog
goo.gl/R5znU5

Can slang can cause both native and non-native speakers problems?
Yes and here are some reasons slang terms can cause problems.
Some slang phrases are only used in one English speaking country and not others.
Some slang phrases are only used in limited parts of some countries and are so local they might be completely incomprehensible to anyone from outside the area.
And some slang phrases have different meanings in different counties, for example the slang word “pissed” means angry in American English and drunk in British English.

In American they say:
Speaker one: “John was so pissed last night”
Speaker two: “Yes, I have never seen him so angry”

In Britain and Ireland they say:
Speaker one: “John was so pissed last night”
Speaker two: “Yes, I have never seen him drink so much beer; he must have a big hangover today”

One thing we love at Smart Language Solutions is learning new slang phrases especially local slang phrases.

That’s why we want to help you to better understand the non-vulgar Irish slang phrase “ah here”.

What is the correct pronunciation of "Ah" in the phrase?
The correct way to pronounce the “Ah” is to use the same “a” sound from the following words “Alphabet” and “Addiction”.

What is the meaning of here?
Here can be used as an adverb, a noun, an adjective, an interjection and in many idioms.
As an adverb it is used to suggest a place, “put your coat here”.
As a noun it is used to suggest a locality, “I live a short distance from here”.
As an adjective it is used to suggest emphasis, "Look at this book, here"
As an interjection it is used to get attention, "Here! Listen to me"
However, we think you should check all 18 meanings/uses of here by clicking here to go to our website goo.gl/R5znU5

In Ireland when they put ah + here together in the same sentence they could mean a number of different things.
It is slang after all!

The slang term, ah here is used to express a strong disagreement with another person’s statement.

For example, two people are having an argument and one person makes a statement that the other person disagrees with the first person can use ah here to emphasis their disagreement.

Example
Speaker One – “I know Brexit will be great for Ireland”
Speaker Two – “Ah here, that’s complete nonsense”

Ah here can also be used to express frustration, especially when one person thinks the other is lying.

Example
Speaker one – “I did not fight with your brother last night!”
Speaker two – “Ah here that’s a lie; I have mobile phone video of you and my brother fighting.”

When ah here is combined with “leave it out” it is used to make a very strong suggestion to stop doing something.

Example
Speaker one – “Just look at how fast I can accelerate my car from 100KM to 150KM”
Speaker two – “Ah here leave it out, we are in 50KM zone”

Before you read on, remember after you have read this blog you will find a fun quiz on our website,
goo.gl/R5znU5

The Irish slang phrase, ah here, is used to express disagreement, frustration, or a desire for someone to stop doing something.

Now you know the meaning of ah here, the question has to be:

How can I safely practice using this and other slang phrases?
There are many ways to practice using your language skills, for example you could travel to the country where they speak your second language and immerse yourself in the environment.
However this is not always practical, or cheap.

You could attend your local language school and take some language lessons.
This is a great option, but you are limited to following the curriculum of the language school, and may never get a chance for free speaking during lesson time.

Here at Smart Language Solutions we suggest the best way to improve your second language is to use our language exchange website.

What is language exchange?
Language exchange is where two or more people with different native languages meet to practice each other’s languages in a safe, fun and non-judgmental environment.

However a big problem with traditional language exchange is it can be difficult to find people in your town or city who are happy to meet you and exchange languages.

That is why we created Smart Language Solutions, the online language exchange website.

What is an online language exchange website?
An online language exchange website is a place for people who want to improve their second or third language by speaking with native speakers and virtually immersing themselves in the culture without ever leaving home!

Example
Elena lives in Moscow and is an executive at a large international accounting company; she wants to improve her English and French for work.
Isabel lives in Montpelier and wants to practice Russian for fun.
Mark lives in Dublin and will be transferred by his company to Moscow in 6 months for a year, and he wants to improve his Russian.

Elena, Isabel and Mark all have accounts on the Smart Language Solutions language exchange website, where they use the search function to find each other.
Elena asks Isabel to help her improve her intermediate level French and Isabel gets Elena to help her with her Russian pronunciation.
Elena improves her business English with Mark, and then helps Mark improve his Russian language and understanding of Moscow culture.

Why should I use Smart Language Solutions for my language exchange?
We offer safe and secure video, voice and text chat.
This means our users do not have to share any personal details, such as email, Skype or Facetime id with other users.
Using our search filters our clients can find chat partners with the same interests, and age ranges.

The Smart Language Solutions language exchange website is not a teaching method or school; it is way to immerse yourself in the second or third language you want to improve without ever leaving the comfort of your home, office or local coffee shop!

I am sure I can now here you say “ah here, I understand why I should use Smart Language Solutions for my language exchange, but where is the quiz you promised?”

It is on our website, goo.gl/R5znU5

#Language #Slang #Exchange #Ah #Here #English #School #Free #Words #Terms #Phrases #Skype #App
Text and Meme by Tutor Feargal
© 2016 Smart Language Solutions

Ah here an Irish Slang phrase on the online language exchange website. Learn to understand the Irish slang phrase Ah Here on our langauge exchange blog.
1
Add a comment...
 
Do you know the meaning of the idiom October Surprise?

In this blog we will try to answer the question what is the October surprise?
I decided to write this blog on Monday morning October 3rd 2016, the idea popped into my head while I was listening to the news on BBC Radio 4.
During the news, the BBC reported that WikiLeaks and its founder Julian Assange had decided not release a set of documents on Tuesday 4th October.
During the new bulletin the newsreader used the phrase “October Surprise” and that, gave me the idea for this article.

The news report did not give any reason why WikiLeaks would not release the documents on Tuesday 4th.

If you want to get the full version of this blog, then go to our website and read it there:

http://smartlanguagesolutions.es/meaning-idiom-october-surprise/

The English idiom October Surprise is a new idiom in the English language, it first appeared in 1972 during the United States election campaign between Richard Nixon and George McGovern.
Nixon was the president of the United States at the time and McGovern was his challenger.

During his previous four years as president Nixon had promised to end the war in Vietnam, but had not done so.

Many people in American though if they elected McGovern he would end the war, and it looked like he would win the election.

However on 26th October, just 12 days before Election Day, Nixon and his National Security advisor, Henry Kissinger, had a surprise press conference and announced that the end of the war was very near. This announcement allowed Nixon to win the election.
The war in Vietnam ended in 1975.

The next time the idiom October Surprise was used was in 1980 in the election between President Jimmy Carter and challenger Ronald Regan.
One of the main election issues at that time was what would happen to the Americans who were held hostage in Iran.

Regan was worried that if Carter managed to get the hostages released before the election then Carter would be re-elected.
However in the last days of October the Iranian government announced that the hostages would not be released until after the election.
Regan was elected president, and on the day he took office the hostages were released by Iran.

This October Surprise is also known as the October Conspiracy, because many people think that Regan agreed with the Iranians to keep the hostages so that Carter would lose the election.

In more recent times, October surprises have been;

During the 2000 election campaign the announcement that George W Bush had been arrested for drunk driving in 1976, this was supposed to harm Bush’s changes, its seems it didn’t.

During the 2004 election campaign the announcement by Saudi Arabia in October that oil prices were to be cut, this was supposed to help Bush, and it seems it did.

During the 2008 election the announcement in late October the Barak Obama’s aunt was living in the United States as an illegal immigrant, was supposed to harm Obama’s chances, but it seems it didn’t.

During the 2016 election campaign, Donal Trumps tax return was released showing he legally paid no tax for 20 years, at the time of writing this blog it
is unclear if this will have an effect on the election.

As you can see from the pattern of events listed above an October Surprise is an announcement deliberately created to influence the outcome of the American presidential election.

It is called the October Surprise because the United States Presidential election is always held in early November.

So by releasing the surprise in October it is hoped that the event will persuade people make up their mind one way or the other.

The surprise can be used both negatively against one candidate and positively for another candidate.

The idiom October Surprise is now used in the English speaking world to describe any surprise announcement shortly before an election, regardless of when the election is.

For example:
“Ahead of next week’s general election on May 15th the Prime Minister has today announced that income tax will be cut to 0.5% for all workers, the leader of the opposition called this announcement an October Surprise in early May”

Now you know what the Idiom October Surprise means you should practice it with others on our language exchange website.

What is language exchange?
Language exchange is where two or more people with different native languages come together to chat and practice their second language.
For example an English speaker, who wants to practice Spanish, can meet a Spanish speaker who wants to practice English.
They agree a time, topics and which language to start in, they then have a chat, correcting each other’s mistakes as they go along.

What is an online language exchange?
If you are not in city where you can easily find native speakers of the second language you want to improve, then the best thing is to meet online.
There are many language exchange apps that hook you up with just about anybody regardless of your learning preferences; you can even look for random strangers to practice your language exchange with on skype or facetime.

Here at Smart Language Solutions we don’t think that is the best way to improve.
That is why when you create your profile on our website you will fill out details that will allow you to find chat matches that like the same things as you, who are in your age range as you, and who are not looking for inappropriate contact.
Remember when you language exchange with Smart Language Solutions, your personal details remain private, and you can block anyone you don’t want to chat to, allowing you to focus on improving your second language the way you want too.

Smart Language Solutions, the language exchange site where hopefully you won’t find any nasty October Surprises!
#English #Idiom #Language #Exchange #October #Surprise #Learn #Online #Skype
Text and meme Tutor Feargal
© Smart Language Solutions 2016

1
Add a comment...
 
Do you blow hot and cold? Find out in this blog from Smart Language Solutions

English Idiom to Blow Hot and Cold - Language Exchange Blog

Take a look at this example sentence:

“John is blowing hot and cold about buying a new car”.

Can you guess the meaning of to blow hot and cold from that sentence?

Read the full interactive version of this blog on our website:
smartlanguagesolutions.es/english-idiom-to-blow-hot-and-cold-language-exchange-blog/

If not let me give you a little more information, read this sentence:

“John is blowing hot and cold about buying a new car, I wish he would make up his mind”.

Does that sentence help?

As you can see in the second sentence the speaker is frustrated because John has not made the decision if he will buy a new car or not.

We use the expression to blow hot and cold when we want to describe a situation where the answer to a particular question is a choice between two options, and the person making the decision is uncertain which decision to make.

Here is another example:

“Joan is always blowing hot and cold, it really is difficult to work with her.”

As is often the case in English, to blow hot and cold has another meaning and can also be used to describe someone who is enthusiastic one moment and uninterested the next.

“My friend blows hot and cold about the TV show Lost one week she wants to watch it and the next she doesn’t”.

To blow hot and cold, is used to describe someone who has difficulty making a decision and to describe a person who is enthusiastic one moment and uninterested the next.

Now you know how to use this idiom log into our language exchange website and practice it with native English speakers who are looking to exchange English for your native language on our language exchange website Smart Language Solutions.

#English #Idiom #Blow #Hot #Cold #Language #Exchange

Text: Tutor Feargal
Meme: Tutor Feargal
(c) Smart Language Solutions 2016

English Idiom to Blow Hot and Cold - Language Exchange Blog. In this blog post we will explain how to correctly use the English Idiom blow hot and cold.
1
Add a comment...
 
We hope you are enjoying our free English lessons.

Our next post will help you remember how to use all FOUR uses of Future WIll Continuous.

Remember we are a Language Exchange website, a place where you can practice your second language for FREE in real time with our chat and video apps with native speakers from all over the world.

Go to our site www.smartlanguagesolutions.com and sign up today.

Now for the free lesson

English Grammar, The Future Will Continuous Tense – Learn with Language Exchange.

Improve your use and understanding of the future will continuous tense with this free lesson from the language exchange website – Smart Language Solutions.

No matter how well you speak any language it is always a good idea to review the grammar rules to make sure that you are not making any errors.

That is why here at SmartLanguageSolution.com – The Language Exchange website – we have many posts to help you review your grammar skills.

When you have finished reading this post you can practice what you have learnt with English speakers who want to exchange their English for your native language on our safe, secure and FREE language exchange website.

What is the future will continuous tense?
Like all continuous tenses, the future will continuous (also called the future progressive in American English) is used to express the idea of an action in progress.
The future will continuous has four distinct uses.

What is the first use of future will continuous?
Future will continuous is used to describe a predicted interruption to a future action.

I am sure I will be eating dinner when you call.

John – “What will you be doing while I am in work tomorrow?”
Mary – “I will be skiing in Italy”

When we use future will continuous to express an interrupted future action we have to use two actions and we must use two different tenses, future will continuous and the present simple.

Future will continuous is used to express the main action, the action that will be in progress, and the present simple is used to express the short action, that will interrupt the main action.

I will be eating – The main action, the action in progress - expressed in future will continuous.

When you call – The short action, the interrupting action - expressed in present simple.

The main action is always the first action in chronological order and the interrupting action is always second action in chronological order.

When we use future will continuous to express an interrupted action we can change the word order without changing the chronological order.

I will be eating dinner when you call. – The first action in chronological order is, eating dinner and the second action in chronological order is, your call.

When you call I will be eating dinner. – The first action in chronological order is, eating dinner and the second action in chronological order is, your call.

Top Tip

When do I use when, and when do I use while in future will continuous?
For the rest of this lesson included the audio and free quiz click here:
http://smartlanguagesolutions.com/blog/2016/12/13/english-grammar-the-future-will-continuous-tense-learn-with-language-exchange/

1
Add a comment...
 
Thank you for reading our posts.

In this post we will explain how to correctly use will as a future tense.

Remember you can practice what you have learnt with native speakers on our free to use language exchange website Smart Language Solutions (click on the logo to create an account).

What is the future will tense?
The future will tense is used to describe four different future possibilities.

Sometimes this tense is called future will or future simple.

What is the first use of future will?
Future will is used to describe a spontaneous decision made at the moment of speaking.

Speaker One – “I am going to the cinema tonight”
Speaker Two – “Good idea, I will go with you”

When we make a decision about the future at the moment of speaking then we use will to tell others this decision.

If we have already made a decision about the future we use going to.

What is the second use of future will?
Click here goo.gl/G5x5PA to read the rest of this post for FREE on our website, you can listen to the audio and you can take our fun quiz to test your understanding.

#English #Grammar #Future #Tense #Will #Simple #Language #Exchange
English Grammar Future Will (Simple) | Learn with language Exchange. Improve your understanding of the future will tense with this free English lesson.
1
Add a comment...
 
English grammar past simple tense – language exchange.

Improve your use of the English grammar tense Past Simple on the best language exchange website.

No matter how well you speak any language it is always a good idea to review the grammar rules to make sure that you are not making any errors, that is why here at SmartLanguageSolutions.com the language exchange website, we have many posts to help you review your grammar skills.

English grammar past simple tense – language exchange website

Remember when you have read this post you can practice what you have learnt with native English speakers who want to exchange English for your native language on our safe, secure and FREE language exchange website.


What is the past simple tense?
The past simple tense, sometimes called the simple past, is an English grammar tense that has 4 different uses.

The past simple tense may cause many students to worry, not because it is difficult to understand but because of the long list of irregular verbs that students must learn.

Top Tip
The most important rule to remember when using the past simple is the action happened at a specific time in the past*, is finished, and has no connection to now.

What is the first use of the past simple?
The past simple is used to express a past action that is finished.

I woke up at 10am yesterday.
He walked to my house last night.
They finished work on the new website last week.

What is the second use of the past simple?
Click on the image to go to our website to read the rest of this blog, take the quiz and listen to the audio!
1
Add a comment...
 
English grammar present simple tense

No matter how well we speak any language it is always a good idea to review the grammar rules to make sure that you are not making any errors, that is why here at Smart Language Solutions, the language exchange website, have many posts to help you review your grammar skills.

Remember when you have read this post you can practice what you have learnt with native English speakers who want to exchange English for your native language on our safe, secure and FREE language exchange website.
You can also listen to the audio and take the free quiz.

What is the present simple tense?
The present simple tense (also called the simple present tense) is the first tense most people learn in English, and it has four different uses.

Depending on how we use the present simple there are a number of different ways of constructing the tense.

Before we look at the different ways to construct the present simple let’s look at the four different uses of present simple in English.

What is the first use of present simple?

To read the rest of this post, take the quiz and hear the audio, go to our website
Click Here to go to our website

English grammar present simple tense – language exchange. Improve your use of the English grammar tense present simple on the best language exchange website
1
Add a comment...
 
Improve your knowledge of so, neither, either, too in this English Grammar Blog

Improve your knowledge of so, neither, either, & too in this English Grammar blog post from Smart Language Solutions.

Reading time of this article is about 6 minutes; the level of this article is intermediate.

In English, as in any language, we can use short answers to questions or statements.
But sometimes short answers can sound angry or offensive, for example the other day on the tube here in London I overheard the following short and angry conversation:

Tube Traveller One: “Are you going to stay late in work today?”
Tube Traveller Two: “Yes”

It was clear from the conversation that the second tube traveller was angry about something.

Of course we can use short answers and not be angry or rude, but if you give some more information when you answer it always sounds politer, for example the conversation on the tube could have been:

Tube Traveller One:” Are you going to stay late in work today?”
Tube Traveller Two: “Yes, I need to catch up on my hours”

However when we use so, neither, either and too in short answers we can sound nice and friendly.

Before we look at how to use so, neither, either and too, let’s ask and answer the following important question.

What are the meanings of the words so, neither, either and too?

All the following definitions are taken from dictionary.com, and are shortened for this blog.

If you are reading this blog on our website you can click through to the full meaning of each word on dictionary.com, if you are reading this post elsewhere there are no links.

So – This is an adverb with at least seven different meanings.

Either – This can be an adjective, pronoun, conjunction or adverb.

Neither – This can be an adjective, conjunction or pronoun.

Too – This is an adverb with at least five different meanings.

Top Tip:
When you come across a new word in English use your English – English dictionary to check how many different meanings it has, and in what context to use it.
Please do not rely on just your translation dictionary.

When do I use so, either, neither and too?

We use these so, either, neither and too when we want to agree or disagree with someone else’s statements.

So

We use “so” when we agree with a positive statement however we must combine “so” with the auxiliary verb in the original statement.

Example one:

“I am thinking of going to Spain on holidays next year”

In that sentence the auxiliary verb is “am”.

To agree with that statement we say “so am I”

Example two:

“I can play the piano”

In that sentence the auxiliary verb is “can”.

To agree with the that sentence we say “so can I”

Neither

We use “neither” when we agree with a negative statement however we must combine “neither” with the auxiliary verb in the original statement.

Example three:

“I am not thinking of going to Spain on holiday next year”

In that negative statement the auxiliary verb is “am”.

To agree with the negative statement we say “neither am I”

Example four:

“I can’t play the piano”

In that negative statement the auxiliary verb is “can”.

To agree with that negative statement we say “neither can I”

Remember “so” is used to agree with positive statements and “neither” is used to agree with negative statements.

Too

We use the word “too” when we want to agree with a positive statement.
It is grammatically correct to repeat the auxiliary verb from the original statement, and if there is no auxiliary verb we use do/does/did.
However, it is very common in spoken English not to repeat the auxiliary verb.

Example Five:

“I have a piano”

In that statement the auxiliary verb is “have”.

To agree with that sentence we can say “I have too” or “me too”

Example six:

“I like cake”

In that statement there is no auxiliary verb.

To agree with that stamen we can say “I do too” or “me too”.

Either and Neither

We use either and neither to agree with negative statements.
Either is used with the pronoun “I” and neither is used with the pronoun “me”.
When we use either we repeat the auxiliary verb and when we use neither we don’t repeat the auxiliary verb.

Example seven:

“I don’t like beer”

In that statement the negative auxiliary verb is “don’t”.

To agree with that statement we can say “I don’t either” or “me neither”.


Example eight:

“I can’t sing”

In that statement the negative auxiliary verb is “can’t”.

To agree with that negative statement we can say “I can’t either” or “me neither”.

So, too, either and neither are words that can be used to reply to positive and negative sentences in a short and polite manner.

Now that you know the difference, the next question is:

How can I test the English grammar I have learnt?

There are many different ways to test your English grammar, you can use books like English Grammar in use, you can ask your teacher, or you can immerse yourself in English.

Immersing yourself in English (or any language) is considered the best way to improve your language skills.

To immerse yourself in English you can go to one of the many English speaking countries, such as America, Canada, Ireland, The United Kingdom, Australia or New Zealand.

When you get to one these countries you then have find people to talk too, and hope that they will be happy to engage with you.

Another way to immerse yourself in English, is using an online Language Exchange website.

Language Exchange is when you swap your native language with a native speaker of the language you want to practice.
For example, a Spanish person. Isabel wants to improve her English, and an American person, Bill wants to improve his Spanish.
Isabel and Bill can meet on a language exchange website and spend some time talking in English and some time talking in Spanish.

What is the best language exchange website?

We say that the best language exchange website is Smart Language Solutions.

When you sign up for free language exchange on the Smart Language Solutions website you will be asked to enter the subjects that are interesting to you.

This will allow you to find language exchange chat partners who are interested in talking about the things you want to talk about.

Happy chatting!

Text & Meme: Tutor Feargal.
© Smart Language Solutions 2016

http://smartlanguagesolutions.eu/blog/2016/10/12/easy-english-grammar-blog-neither-either/
Improve your knowledge of so, neither, either, too, in this Grammar blog. In this blog we explain how to agree & disagree using so, neither, either, & too
1
Add a comment...
 
What is the difference between jam and jelly in British & American English?

In this blog post on the world’s best free language exchange website we will try to explain the difference.
It is important to know the difference, because if you don’t know it, you could ruin your meals on next visit to either country.

Read the full version of this post on our website go to this link at Smart Language Solutions, where you can exchange your native Language for the second langue you are learning for free.
goo.gl/qlp4EJ

Before we explain when to use jam or jelly we need to ask ourselves;
is there a difference between British and American English?

Yes there is!
In fact there are many differences between American and British English; the most obvious differences is accent.

However it does not matter what your accent is, American, British, Irish, Spanish, Russian, Chinese or any other. If your English pronunciation is clear, people will understand you.
Later in this post I will give you three easy steps that will help to improve your English pronunciation.

Another difference between British and American English is the use of nouns.
For example the most obvious difference is the name of things we drive around in, in British English they are called cars and in American English they are called automobiles!

However, in this blog we will explain how the British and the Americans use the nouns jam and jelly.

You might not think it is important to know the difference between jam and jelly in British & American English, but we say it is!
Because if you don’t it could ruin your next meal.

In English the first meal of the day is called breakfast, and it is traditionally eaten between 6 am and 9 am, this is followed by lunch and then by dinner (or tea).

A popular breakfast meal is sliced bread or toast with a fruit spread on top.


The collective name for all fruit spreads is “preserve”, and a preserve is made by boiling chopped fruit with sugar and water and letting it cool.

There are many types of preserve and they all have different names for example marmalade, which is made from oranges, is very popular in England and the British English speaking world.

Also popular in England and the British English speaking world is jam.
Jam is used to describe most fruit preserves, and we normally put the name of the fruit before jam, for example:
Strawberry Jam
Raspberry Jam
Apple Jam
And so on.

In British English jam, is the fruit preserve spread on bread or toast at breakfast time.

Sometimes after lunch or dinner we can have a desert, maybe ice-cream or cake, or even a gelatine (gelatin) fruit flavoured desert.

In British English, gelatine fruit flacoured deserts are called jelly.

Jelly and cream is a very popular desert for children.

Jelly is made by dissolving gelatine, sugar, and fruit flavouring in boiling water and then letting it cool.

You will notice that I have spelt the word gelatine with and “e” at the end, this is because my English is British English.
In American English gelatine is spelt without “e”, gelatin.

In the same way as English people, American people like to have fruit preserve on the bread and toast in the morning.
However in American English fruit preserve is called jelly, not jam.

But what if you want to have a fruit flavoured gelatine desert after lunch or dinner in America, what do you ask for?

You ask for jello, not jelly.

Remember when you are having breakfast with British English speakers and you want some fruit preserve for your bread or toast ask your host for jam, example:

“Do you have any raspberry jam?”

But when you are at breakfast with America English speakers ask your host for jelly, example:

“Do you have any raspberry jelly?”

If you are at lunch with British English speakers and want some fruit flavoured gelatine desert and you have to ask for jelly, example:

“Do you mind if I have some jelly and cream?”

But if you are at lunch with American English speakers and want some fruit flavoured gelatine desert you have to ask for jello, example:

“Do you mind if my child has some jello?”

One final extra, the verb “to jam” is used to describe when a group of musicians come together to perform unrehearsed music.

Earlier in this blog I told you I would give you three easy steps to answer the question:

How can I improve my English pronunciation?
Well you can buy professional elocution lessons, but if you don’t have much time or money then here are my three easy steps to improve your pronunciation.

1. Immerse yourself in English talk radio.
Go online and find the websites for BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 5, LBC, RTE Radio 1, and so on.
When you listen to the talk enjoy the sound of what you are listening too, and try to copy what you hear.

2. Watch your favourite English language TV show and movies in English!

3. Create an account on our online language exchange website or app, Smart Language Solutions.
Find native English speakers who are practising your language.
Make new friends with other language exchange partners, and chat for free.
Remember on our language exchange website your privacy is protected and you don’t have to share your email, Skype, Facebook or any other personal details if you don’t want to.

#English #British #American #Jelly #Jam #Lesson #Blog #Slang #Language #Exchange

Text and meme by Tutor Feargal
© Smart Language Solutions 2016

1
Add a comment...
Contact Information
Map of the business location
Suite 3a Oriental Road Woking GU22 7AH UK
Suite 3a Oriental RoadGBSurreyWokingGU22 7AH
Language School, Courses and Training
Language School
Courses and Training
Educational Consultant
Institute
Training Courses
Today Open 24 hours
Wednesday Open 24 hoursThursday Open 24 hoursFriday Open 24 hoursSaturday 12AM–11:59PMSunday Open 24 hoursMonday Open 24 hoursTuesday Open 24 hours
Google+ URL

Street View

Panorama
Write a review
Review Summary
Be the first to review
Photos
Scrapbook photo 2
Scrapbook photo 3
Scrapbook photo 4
Upload public photo
Your Activity