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1080 Science
The Science behind 1080 poison
The Science behind 1080 poison
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by Dr Jo Pollard (BSc (Hons, PhD))

Back in the 1990s, in at least one institution, rigorous government science was alive and well.

At Invermay Agricultural Research Centre, “Lab” meetings were being held where the scientist (or trembling student) presented his or her proposed experiment: the background, hypotheses to be tested and methods. From these proposals were hammered out, with the critical input of all to be involved (particularly sharp, insightful comments were usual from some of the technical staff). Biometric approval was required to ensure the results from the research would be meaningful.

Read the full article: http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/SC1705/S00020/loss-of-science-quality-in-nz-is-having-dire-consequences.htm
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Monofluoroacetate (know as Compound 1080) was originally developed and marketed as an insecticide. It functions primarily by interfering with the citrate step in the Krebs cycle [5].
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For more than 15 years, the New Zealand Department of Conservation (DoC), the Animal Health Board (AHB), a society formed by the government to eradicate bovine Tb in NZ cattle and several regional and district councils have been widely distributing from the air large amounts of food laced with an extremely toxic chemical, monofluoroacetate (1080), in an effort to kill possums and rats.

The purpose stated by DoC is to protect native birds. The AHB believes possums to be a wild animal vector for bovine Tb. This practice has been extended across the length and breadth of New Zealand, concentrating on its forest systems.
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In June 2011 New Zealand’s Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment (PCE), Dr Jan Wright, announced that there should be more 1080 poison spread by air across NZ’s wilderness areas.

Furthermore that the use of aerial 1080 and other poisons to control pests should be subject to fewer regulations (PCE, 2011).
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Each year, New Zealand aerially distributes massive quantities of acutely lethal, poison-laced foodstuffs into its wilderness ecosystems. The toxin most commonly used is sodium monofluoroacetate (compound 1080), an acutely toxic, oxygen metabolism-disrupting agent with very high toxicity to most air-breathing organisms.

New Zealand ecological conservation officials claim that aerial poison operations are an essential strategy to protect vulnerable indigenous flora and fauna from exotic mammalian pests, and that the benefits of aerial poison operations outweigh their risks.
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Annually, the New Zealand Department of Conservation (DoC) and the New Zealand Animal Health Board (AHB) drop from the air food laced with enough of an “extremely hazardous” (17) poison (sodium monofluoroacetate, also called compound 1080) into New Zealand’s unique forest ecosystems to kill every person in New Zealand 8 times over.
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Reasons to be concerned about the widespread use of aerially distributed food baits containing 1080 poison (sodium monofluoroacetate) for pest control in New Zealand are evident in scientific publications and government reviews and reports.
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A recent review highlighting several reasons for concern regarding the New Zealand Government’s policy of widespread aerial poisoning with sodium monofluoroacetate (1080), was sent to several Government ministers and staff (in August 2016).
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