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Part-Time Scientists
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Awesome Darth Vader ad for bike safety promotes the benefits of wearing helmets! Well played :-)
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Which benefits when it comes to bike helmets? Oh, I forgot the manufacturers income. Right, we need that. All of us.
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A complete lunar cycle. Great post detailing the moon as we can observe it everyday https://plus.google.com/b/107778888097122544837/118052189106432620306/posts/3kUe4Fp6CwJ?cfem=1
A Complete Lunar Cycle The term "moon cycle" (or "lunar cycle") refers to the moon's continuous orbit around the earth. As the moon orbits the earth, its… - Anthony Middleton - Google+
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This MusicMonday we have Peter Hollens and Malukah covering Baba Yetu, the Civilization IV Theme:
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Brad Leclerc's profile photoGerard Goedbloed's profile photoDave Booth's profile photo
 
It was pretty odd finding out the theme to Civ 4 was basically just a translation of the Lord's prayer in Swahili, but it's still pretty damn epic. The music for Civ games is so great.
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More Music [on] Monday. Katastro and Scoreboard:
Katastro
Scoreboard
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Stevie Ray Vaughan is walking a Tightrope for our MusicMonday:
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Just the best.   Any better would be superfluous. 
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Rest in peace Leonard Nimoy. We mark the passing of a great advocate and educator of space exploration!
May his memory live long and prosper.
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In their circles
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MusicMonday with the Part-Time Scientists. Today we have Avicii and "The Nights":
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I like that song 
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For our MusicMonday we have an awesome video about the Monsters of the Cosmos by the Symphony of Science:
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MusicMonday today. The Shins are making a Comet Appear:
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Widdler with Dopamine for this MusicMonday:
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Today we have the visually spectacular, computer-rendered short film Wanderer by Erik Wernquist. Oh, and it has music, too.
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Reminded me of Stargate Universe. Such a shame that that show didn't go on beyond two seasons. Anyway, an epic short film. I hope that I'll live long enough to be able to visit other planets.
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The Rosette Nebula in Hydrogen and Oxygen
Image Credit & Copyright: Arno Rottal (Far-Light-Photography)
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150225.html

The Rosette Nebula is not the only cosmic cloud of gas and dust to evoke the imagery of flowers -- but it is the most famous. At the edge of a large molecular cloud in Monoceros, some 5,000 light years away, the petals of this rose are actually a stellar nursery whose lovely, symmetric shape is sculpted by the winds and radiation from its central cluster of hot young stars. The stars in the energetic cluster, cataloged as NGC 2244, are only a few million years old, while the central cavity in the Rosette Nebula, cataloged as NGC 2237, is about 50 light-years in diameter. The nebula can be seen firsthand with a small telescope toward the constellation of the Unicorn (Monoceros).
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Hell Yeah, it's Rocket Science!
Introduction

Our mission: Challenge the Moon!

We're the Part-Time Scientists, an official team on the Google Lunar X PRIZE. We want to land a rover on the moon and send and receive HD video from this far-away object. For real. Hell yeah, it's rocket science!

Mission



Our Goals:

Safely land a robot on the surface of the Moon
Travel 500 meters over the lunar surface
Send images and data back to Earth

Our Launcher:

To get our mission of the ground we are using a rocket that delivers our payload into low Earth orbit (LEO).
Low Earth orbit is where most satellites are, and we will be using a rocket that normally launches satellites. This may be a Dnepr, a rocket which was initially developed as an ICBM (InterContinental Ballistic Missile - meant to carry nuclear warheads), but currently used as cheap, reliable satellite carriers. It's not the biggest or newest rocket out there, but it should do the job, which is to get our payload from Baikonur Cosmodrome to LEO.

The Dnepr Rocket (Link in German)

The Dnepr Rocket (Link in English)

Our Lander:

The rocket lifts our package, also called a payload, into low Earth orbit. From there it needs to go to the surface of the moon.
The lander is the vehicle that is responsible for this part of the trip. It has rocket engines that take it from LEO into an orbit around the moon, and from there safely down to the lunar surface.
The trip from LEO to lunar orbit is longest part of the journey, maybe two weeks.
The safe landing on the moon surface is the hardest part of the journey. Thousands of little things could go wrong, and each of those little things could mean failure for our mission.

3D Printed model of our Lander

Our Rover:

The lander is the rocket’s payload, but it has a payload of its own, the rover.
We have to send a rover to the moon to win the GLXP competition, but we want it to do a few extra things as well. After all, how many times do you get send a rover to the moon? May as well make the most of it.

After the lander gets safely to the moon’s surface, our rover Asimov will complete the GLXP requirements of driving 500 meters and transmitting HD video back to earth.
We will be driving the rover from Earth like a remote control car, just without being able to see it and with a ~3 second delay between sending a control signal from Earth and receiving the video back from the moon.

Asimov.jr our Rover


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Part-Time-Scientists GmbH Robert Böhme Kaulsdorfer Str. 13A 12621 Berlin