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"Contrary to suggestions that sleepy surgeons might make more mistakes in the middle of the night, a large study finds no differences in patient deaths after trauma surgeries done at night or during the day," reports Reuters. "The studies here add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that surgeons, particularly experienced surgeons, can devise techniques to compensate for sleep disruption," said Carlos A. Pellegrini, MD, FACS, FRCSI (Hon.), immediate Past-President of the ACS.
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Happy New Year from the American College of Surgeons!
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Our new verification program for pediatric surgical centers is the focus of an article by Laura Landro in the Wall Street Journal. "The goal is to see that every child in the United States receives care in a surgical environment matched to their individual medical, emotional and social needs," said Keith Oldham [MD,FACS], chairman of the task force that developed the new standards and surgeon in chief at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
Surgeons have developed a new classification system for pediatric surgical centers according to the level of care they provide and hospitals are offering new programs to help demystify the risks and benefits of pediatric surgery
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"The creation of Iowa’s trauma system in 2001 has decreased the gap between what’s being taught in educational courses and what is needed in rural communities, the panelists said...[David Hoyt, MD, FACS] said since the system started, there has been a 49 percent decrease in traumatic brain injury and a 20 percent decrease in mortality," reports The Gazette.
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"Surgeons will drain their blood and replace it with freezing saltwater. Without heartbeat and brain activity, the patients will be clinically dead. And then the surgeons will try to save their lives," reports The New York Times.
Doctors at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center plan to treat trauma patients with an experimental procedure that induces hypothermia in dying patients to buy them more time.
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"I have found that artists and surgeons appreciate human anatomy with equal passion." ~ James Chang, MD, FACS
For many years, Stanford University surgeon James Chang has been fascinated by Rodin's hands, sculptures made by the French artist in the 19th century.
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Have them in circles
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"Surgery chose me. I know this because I tried hard to like other specialties—afraid of those things that made me want to quit. But because surgery chose me, I feel a duty to fulfill my destiny—to persevere because maybe I, like all of us in this most difficult of professions, was chosen for a reason." ~ Rebecca L. Hoffman, MD
This can't be happening, I thought. We are 30 years old. I am a surgical resident interested in oncology, for God's sake. But somehow there I was, staring at our new reality—a magnetic resonance imaging test result showing a large mass lesion in the right temporal lobe of my husband's brain, ...
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In a world first, a paralyzed man is able to walk again after Polish surgeons, with the help of London scientists, transplanted cells from his nasal cavity into his spinal cord.
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"Dr. Ernest Amory Codman was in his mid-40s when his golden career as a sought-after Harvard surgeon began to unravel. He had quit in exasperation from Massachusetts General Hospital, and when he took his dispute with hospital leaders public, colleagues turned against him...A century later, many of Codman’s ideas are the bedrock of modern medicine. And a group of doctors, including a former Mass. General surgery chief, plans to make sure he gets the wider appreciation he deserves this week," reports the Boston Globe.
Dr. Ernest Amory Codman was in his mid-40s when his golden career as a sought-after Harvard surgeon began to unravel. A century later, many of Codman’s ideas are the bedrock of modern medicine. And a group of doctors wants to make sure he gets the wider appreciation he deserves.
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"The difference between Google Glass and other forms of telemedicine is that the wearable computer gives the expert the same perspective as that of the clinical officer in the field," reports the ACS Bulletin.
Google Glass—a Web-connected, wearable computer—could change the way you provide surgical care in the operating room (OR), according to Glass Explorers, a group of beta testers who initially numbered approximately 8000 across the U.S., including members of the American College of Surgeons ...
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"Expanding Medicaid opens patient access to surgical-subspecialty procedures, according to University of Michigan researchers who studied how the proportion of Medicaid patients having certain operations increased 7.2% in New York after Medicaid coverage was expanded there in 2001," reports Modern Healthcare on a study from the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.
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What do you think Ronin's take is? all pro I'm sure
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How to reform the Medicare physician payment system—an opinion piece from ACS President-Elect Andrew L. Warshaw, MD, FACS, in the Boston Globe.
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Have them in circles
346 people
Santa Rosa & Rohnert Park Oral Surgery's profile photo
Amigos do Hospital de Barcelos's profile photo
István Madár's profile photo
JW MacArthur's profile photo
mdsandbox's profile photo
Carlo Contreras, MD's profile photo
HospitalRecruiting.com's profile photo
Staff Care's profile photo
Dr. Armando Caldas - M.D. Orthopaedic Surgeon's profile photo
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Advancing quality surgical care through research, education, accreditation, and advocacy.
Introduction
The American College of Surgeons is a scientific and educational association of surgeons that was founded in 1913 to improve the quality of care for the surgical patient by setting high standards for surgical education and practice.

Members of the American College of Surgeons are referred to as "Fellows." The letters FACS (Fellow, American College of Surgeons) after a surgeon's name mean that the surgeon's education and training, professional qualifications, surgical competence, and ethical conduct have passed a rigorous evaluation, and have been found to be consistent with the high standards established and demanded by the College.

There is also another category of membership known as "Associate Fellow." This category was established to provide an opportunity for surgeons who are beginning surgical practice and who meet specific requirements to assume an active role in the College at an early stage in their careers.

In addition, there are categories of membership for surgical residents, medical students, and members of the surgical team.

The College currently has approximately 77,000 members, including more than 4,000 Fellows in other countries, making it the largest organization of surgeons in the world. There are presently more than 2,600 Associate Fellows.

The American College of Surgeons has created this Google+ page for the purpose of posting and exchanging information that is of interest to those who share our mission of improving the care of surgical patients and safeguarding standards of care in an optimal and ethical practice environment. If you wish to add a comment, contributors must comply with Google's terms of use.

Unless specifically stated otherwise, the opinions expressed and statements made by various authors on this Google+ page reflect the authors' personal observations and do not imply endorsement by--nor official policy of--the American College of Surgeons.

The American College of Surgeons reserves the right to remove objectionable messages from this page at its discretion. Examples include posts that are obscene, libelous, defamatory, threatening, hateful, or embarrassing to others. Repeat offenders may be removed from future use as well.

You may not sell, promote, or advertise any products or contractor services on American College of Surgeons Google+ page. If you can offer expertise, guidance, or information on given subjects, please do so, but do not offer this advice as an attempt to sell your own products or services. Any attempt to solicit customers may result in removal of such messages from this page.

We may include links to other websites, but these links are not an endorsement of those sites, and we are not responsible for the content of any website that is not the property of the American College of Surgeons.

The seal of the American College of Surgeons is a registered trademark and may not be copied, reproduced, or redistributed without prior consent from the American College of Surgeons.

The information provided on this page should not be considered medical advice and cannot replace consultation with a qualified health professional. Your physician or other licensed health care provider is in the best position to assess and address your individual health care needs.

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