Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Chris Bowers Fruit Trees
33 followers -
Specialists in growing fruit.
Specialists in growing fruit.

33 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Here's our new online article about growing fruit on North walls - inspiration and guidance on how to utilize this seemingly most unpromising of situations.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
GROW A MULBERRY TREE IN A POT
The mystical and romantic associations of the Mulberry tree can be enjoyed even in a small garden or a good sized patio pot – with the introduction of our new compact selection, named ‘Black Lady’. Attached is a photo of the ripening fruits of this gorgeous Black Mulberry tree, raken here on the Nursery.
Black Lady is more short-jointed than normal Mulberry Trees which has led to a size reduction of some 20% compared to Morus nigra. The logan-shaped ruby red to black fruits appear in generous clusters, ripening from late July. The flavour is superb – sharp, aromatic, powerful and just made for jams, conserves and serving with vanilla ice cream! 
These are good-looking trees at all stages, densely clad in largedtoothed leaves, a tree of noble character, these leaves turn to all manner of gold and russet shades in Autumn. We shall endeavour to post a further picture then.
Black Lady is entirely hardy and slow growing; grow it in a 24” pot of John Innes no 2 compost and it will be happy for many years and you may even see fruit within 3 seasons. That’s pretty good going for a Mulberry Tree – traditionally they take 10 years or more to fruit!
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Growing Mulberries in containers - and more. 
The mystical and romantic associations of the Mulberry tree can be enjoyed even in a small garden or a good sized patio pot – with the introduction of our new compact selection, named ‘Black Lady’. Attached is a photo of the ripening fruits of this gorgeous Black Mulberry tree, taken here on the Nursery.
Black Lady is more short-jointed than normal Mulberry Trees which has led to a size reduction of some 20% compared to Morus nigra. The logan-shaped ruby red to black fruits appear in generous clusters, ripening from late July. The flavour is superb – sharp, aromatic, powerful and just made for jams, conserves and serving with vanilla ice cream! 
These are good-looking trees at all stages, densely clad in large toothed leaves, a tree of noble character, these leaves turn to all manner of gold and russet shades in Autumn. We shall endeavour to post a further picture then.
Black Lady is entirely hardy and slow growing; grow it in a 24” pot of John Innes no 2 compost and it will be happy for many years and you may even see fruit within 3 seasons. That’s pretty good going for a Mulberry Tree – traditionally  they take 10 years or more to fruit!
You can of course grow any Mulberry in a pot and there are other species and varieties too. Of these, 'King James' [syn Chelsea] is probably the most noteworthy. Propagated from the Black Mulberry Tree growing in the King James Physic Garden, Chelsea, London, it has very good quality black fruits of exceptional flavour.
Mulberries are not just black - white and red forms appear too.
The White Mulberry, Morus alba has a milder, sweeter flavour than the Black kinds, you can eat them straight from the tree which is certainly something you would never do with a Black Mulberry as they are much too sharp. The leaves of the white Mulberry tree are shiny and pale green, turning golden yellow in Autumn. A particularly ornamental form is the weeping white Mulberry, Morus alba pendula. For the most productive white Mulberry I recommend White Wonder, a new selection from Europe.
Lastly there is the 'red' Mulberry, a great speciality from America. Morus rubra has fruits somewhere between the white and black in character, colour and flavour. It's very hard to find and seldom grown but well worth seeking out.
To be continued.....
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Nectarine 'Elruge' - just goes to show these fruits can be grown successfully in the UK. Like all Nectarine and Peaches the flowers are self fertile so you only need to grow one tree. 
Commercial nectarines are picked under-ripe for travelling and the flavour never develops to it's full potential. Growing your own opens your tastebuds to a new experience!
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A strawberry variety enjoying renewed interest is 'Elvira' a variety we have grown for over 30 years. The fruits have a very nice flavour and although for many years the preferred strawberry for greenhouse growing, this is a variety that can do well both indoors and out. The season is naturally second early but this can be encouraged to ripen even earlier with protection. 
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Despite a general lack of rain in this area during the summer so far, some raspberries are producing lovely large berries, notably this late season Glen Magna. 
Remember with main crop varieties such as this to cut all the fruited canes down to ground level in the Autumn. This allows the new canes to develop to carry next years crop. 
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
This is Willingham Greengage, as recommended by the RHS, it is one of the more reliable Gages [some are best only in a warm position]
The flavour is absolutely superb, rich and unmistakably Greengage. It can be enjoyed for dessert as well as for cooking.
Ripening mid August, grow this variety on dwarfing rootstock 'Pixy' if you are short of room; even suitable for a large pot.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
These Honey Peaches are suddenly exploding in popularity and you can grow them in your garden too!
The trees are self fertile [so you only need one] and quite easy to grow.
Grow them in a nice sheltered spot or on the patio in a 24" container - or in your sun lounge or conservatory!
Often thought of as 'new' but we first exhibited them at the Chelsea flower show back in the late 1980's!!
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A QUICK GUIDE TO GROWING…… PEARS
It used to be said that you planted Pears for your heirs! Not anymore; with the advent of dwarfing stocks and improved growing methods you can now have a Pear tree yielding bountifully in your garden within 2/3 seasons. There can be no finer treat than sampling a juicy rich Pear straight from the tree and still warm from the sun.
FIRST CHOOSE YOUR ROOTSTOCK
As with all fruit trees, a Pear is grafted on to a rootstock. This determines how big the tree will grow so it’s important to get the right one.
Quince C Is generally the smallest stock, growing to around 8’ in height and width, it can be controlled to smaller dimensions still. Ideal for a small bush tree and also the preferred choice for cordons and column growing.
Quince A A bit bigger than the above, Quince A may grow 10-12’ or more. Ideal for an orchard setting, paddock, larger lawn etc, and also ideal for fan and espalier growing.
Seedling Pear rootstocks Are very old stocks and generally unused these days. But if you want a super-vigorous stock for a very large area then you may still find them of use. It is also very hardy.
SELF FERTILE VARIETIES
Unless you want to grow 2 or more Pears choose from this list of self compatibile varieties.
Conference
Concorde
Invincible
Improved Fertility
Durondeau
The first 3 are the most satisfactory.
OTHER VARIETIES OF NOTE
Beth is recommended because it’s pretty primrose fruits ripen early and can be enjoyed straight from the tree, often from late August.
Doyenne du Comice is known as the ‘Queen of Pears’ because it is so large and so tenderly juicy. But it needs a warm favourable aspect to yield well and also needs good pollination.
Humbug is a new novelty with charming striped fruits and a lovely taste too.
Williams Bon Chretien is the ultimate Pear eating experience with its super-sweet musky flavour and absolutely dripping with juice.
Make sure the above varieties are planted with another different tree to pollinate.
SITING & SOIL
Pears need a bit more sun and warmth than apples so give them a good aspect. Soil-wise a good deep loam is to be preferred but poorer soils can be improved prior to planting for good results. 
GROWING PEARS AGAINST A WALL
You can fan train or espalier train your Pears against a west or south facing wall. Make sure you have at least 8’ in width and 6-8’ in height to accommodate your tree. 
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
6 GOOD …… CLIMBING FRUITING PLANTS
If you’ve a wall, arch, pergola or fence then what better way to maximize that space than with something deliciously productive?! Hear is our updated top 6 picks for climbing plants that prefer an aerial life!
GRAPE VINE ‘REGENT’ Grapes like all the sun they can get so a warm south or west facing aspect is just perfect. There are lots of varieties you can grow but we chose this one because it rewards on two fronts. First it is very abundantly fruiting with weighty bunches of beautiful red fruits. But almost as importantly, it is attractive too for the autumn foliage turns a rich claret red. ‘Regent’ is mildew resistant too. You could also consider the older variety Brandt which is renowned for the decadence of its purple autumn leaf.
JAPANESE WINEBERRY Probably the most decorative of all the wall plants, the Japanese Wineberry is a unique looking fruiting climber that can also be used to utilize a north or east facing wall. Its fuzzy vermillion-bristled stems and deeply veined lime green leaves are a treat to the eye. The orange-red fruits are a treat to the mouth too and it has been said that they achieve a pinnacle of hedonism when sprinkled with a little red wine! This species looks great in the winter too when it’s red bristled stems can shine in the winter sun. Plant 8’ apart & easy to grow.
BLACKBERRY OBSIDIAN 
A blackberry is a must-have in any fruit collection. Obsidian is one of the top new varieties with smooth-as-silk growth and large jet black fruits. One of the earliest Blackberries to ripen, from late July, the berries are sweet and juicy. Blackberries will grow well even on a shady wall. Other varieties to consider are the parsley leafed Oregon Thornless or, if you want to deter intruders or animals, the prickly Himalayan Giant quickly forms an impenetrable barrier.
GRAPE VINE ‘LAKEMONT SEEDLESS’
If you really would like to plant a seedless Grape Vine then this large pale green fruited Grape is the ideal solution. It’s fruits are sweet and seed-free. It will grow well on a South or West sunny facing aspect and you can either allow it to romp away, or contain it to whatever space you have. 
CHINESE GOOSEBERRY ‘JENNY’ Few people seem to appreciate just how good-looking a Kiwi Vine is, and also that they can actually be grown outside in this country. Given a sunny wall they are hardy and can be very prolific. Harvest the fruits as late as possible and ripen them on a sunny windowsill for enjoyment during November and beyond. The vines are clad in large heart shaped leaves that look as if they have been fashioned from the richest emerald velvet. The stems are densely bristled with pink hairs and the early spring flowers are fragrant! ‘Jenny’ is a self fertile variety so you don’t need a pollinating partner. Also suitable for growing in the greenhouse.
BOYSENBERRY The Boysenberry is a very fine Blackberry-hybrid. It can be grown in just the same way as a Blackberry and it’s thorn free. The fruits have an added dash of rich complexity and make superb jams – but are also well suited to dessert use, served with cream.
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded