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James O'Leary
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James O'Leary

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Brad has been very generous in publishing my comments to his posts of late. I thought I would share this particular comment here. It may yet show up on Sherlock Peoria, but in the meantime it may generate discussion here.

Brad KeefauverApril 5, 2014 at 7:48 PM
Winglock is the product of an enthusiasm for Sherlock Holmes inspired from the heart, the way all things truly Sherlockian are. CBS's Elementary remains a commissioned product created by hirelings by those who sought to mine a vein discovered elsewhere by more creative souls. Give it up, sir, the South has lost the war.

My submitted reply:
Winglock is the product of an enthusiasm for a particular actor in a particular role inspired by a love of Benedict Cumberbatch. Truly Sherlockian has very little to do with it. Created with talent and love, yes, but not for Doyle's creation, but Moffat's. As for CBS, "a commissioned product created by hirelings by those who sought to mine a vein discovered elsewhere by more creative souls" is an opinion of yours not a statement of fact. CBS has had a long interest in creating a contemporary Sherlock Holmes, from 1987's "The Return of Sherlock Holmes" and 1993's "Sherlock Holmes Returns" to 2000's unproduced pilot script called "Elementary" with a present day American Holmes and Watson. Further, "Elementary" is not the first commissioned Sherlock Holmes product and just because a product is commissioned and created by hirelings does not mean it intrinsically lacks worth and is immune from inspiring form the heart, as the young woman you met at last year's 221B Con dressed as Joan Watson demonstrates. 1939's "The Hound of the Baskervilles" may be fairly called "a commissioned product created by hirelings by those who sought to mine a vein" worked elsewhere by a more creative soul. Arthur Conan Doyle. A generation grew up loving the Rathbone/Bruce movies and radio program spinoff. A reasoned and rational debate on the "Sherlockness" of "Elementary" is there to be had; so too with BBC "Sherlock" or any cinematic treatment.

A Sherlockian might collect deerstalkered rubber ducks as part of a wider love of all things Sherlockian, but the duck itself has little to do with Doyle's work. The same with the fanfic created with the images of favorite actors in universes far removed from Doyle's Victorian London or Moffat's contemporary one. Winglock does not exist without Cumberbatch. There is no Gillette Winglock, no Brett Faunlock, no Denis Hoey and Robert Morley Mystrade. As such, Winglock is less "Sherlockian" than "Elementary", alleged origins notwithstanding.

As to giving it up, as the author of "A friendly wager" blog post knows, there is nothing wrong with fighting the good fight even against overwhelming odds and little chance of success. In the long run, I like my odds.
And so it begins. Yes, I knew I was really going to miss going to 221B Con in Atlanta this year, thanks to an unforeseeable combination of events. No big deal, I miss a lot of things. Symposia, Holmes Birthday weekends, vario...
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+Scott Monty I have a feeling the smile is not directed at me.
 
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Recently Bruce Partington-Plans posted a link to a story in the Telegraph about Angela Buckley's book on Jerome Caminada. News of this book with the title "The Real Sherlock Holmes" inspire ire at Sherlock Peoria 
http://sherlockpeoria.blogspot.com/2014/03/pick-your-own-reality-it-may-not-be-mine.html
and at Doyleockian
http://alistaird221b.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-real-sherlock-holmes-give-us-break.html
Ray Wilcockson, as a Sherlockian, has done us the favor of reading the book and letting us know how it reads as a biography of Caminada and the Holmesian connection. The assumption by Allistair Duncan and Brad Keefauver of the publisher exploiting Holmes' fame to sell books is born out by Wilcockson to the detriment of Caminada's story.
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James O'Leary

On the Web  - 
 
This is why I read Sherlock Peoria; thought provoking, oblique-angled musings on Sherlockian-related subjects and issues. In over thirty years of subscribing to the BSJ, there were times I had let my subscription lapse, and not due to a lack of interest, either. I have, and still do, consider the BSJ essential reading. I have, though, lamented on the content of particular issues over the recent years, thinking that there were only one or two good articles and the rest filler. I do realize that some types of articles that don't appeal to me might appeal to others.

There is some great Sherlockian scholarship on the web that would make great content for an issue of the BSJ, but I have thought of online scholarship as an adjunct to the essential, publications-of-record BSJ and SHJ. Is it time to reverse that? Has the internet become "where it's at" and print publications curios for collectors?  

(The ephemeral nature of digital information dependent on advanced and omnipresent technology has me fearing its loss when the inevitable disaster strikes--an EMP detonated in the atmosphere, hacker attach, or the effects of human stupidity and greed. All those irreplaceable ones and zeros lost forever. In fact, it can happen for no reason at all. When a 90's band, who had recorded all their music digitally licensed  a song for a video game soundtrack, it was discovered that the drum track no longer existed; it had winked into limbo like Schrodinger's cat. Print, on the other hand, can and has lasted for a thousand years.)

What's your thoughts? And please go to the comment section at Sherlock Peoria and tell Brad what they are. Tell him James sent you.
Last night I had a dream that I wrote an article for a Sherlockian print publication. I printed it out in the san-serif font and paragraph format requested by said publication, a smaller but esteemed journal of the sort I use...
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James O'Leary

General Discussion  - 
 
In a bid to keep Scotland part of Great Britain, Prime Minister Cameron cites Sherlock Holmes:

 He cited the virtues of North Sea oil, Scottish shipyards and the hit television show Sherlock - which, as Mr Cameron pointed out, was "written by a Scot a hundred years ago, played by an Englishman today - and created for TV by a Scotsman".
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James O'Leary

TV: Elementary (CBS)  - 
 
The "Elementary" writing staff does its research.
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In his circles
12 people
Have him in circles
47 people
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James O'Leary

On the Web  - 
 
+Pamela Bower You know, I still feel bad about my negative remarks when you discussed "Hands of a Murderer" months ago. I hope you enjoy Alistair Duncan's musings.
In my last post I talked about my Holmes and Moriarty galleries and this in turn reminded me that I needed to add a Moriarty. The film Hands of a Murderer, which starred Edward Woodward as Sherlock Holmes, is generally mocked...
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As I occasionally do, I deleted them.
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http://sherlockpeoria.blogspot.com/2014/03/he-hath-made-us-his-cumberbitch.html
"...if an article is about Benedict Cumberbatch, it's about Sherlock Holmes." Sad, but true.
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No thespian is Sherlock Holmes. Cumberbatch isn't. Brett isn't. Rathbone isn't. Gillette isn't. Etc. That's no knock on the actors or their fans. But Brad's point is well taken. I'm afraid we live in a world where Doyle's source material is a footnote on a Wikipedia page.
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James O'Leary

TV: Elementary (CBS)  - 
 
With "Sherlock" Series Three and "Elementary" mid-season two, I am trying to keep happy thoughts. Both have been, shall we say, underwhelming in execution from a Sherlockian standpoint.
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James O'Leary

On the Web  - 
 
I recently had a good run of having my comments posted on Sherlock Peoria and I am most grateful. +Matt Laffey mentioned this wonderful piece in the latest Always 1895 and I'm including my response here. Agree with Brad or not, Sherlock Peoria should be on a Sherlockians list of favorite websites.

"What a too-apt metaphor: the "sleepy little hamlet" of the Sherlock Holmes hobby and the "bigger-than-the-town-itself modern housing development, complete with big-box stores" of BBC "Sherlock". When Anderson's Empty Hearse Emporium dropped down beside the pool on McCarthy's farm you can be sure no environmental impact assessment was run first nor a thought given to the economic result it would have on Morley's General Store downtown. When the statues of Rathbone and Bruce and Brett and Burke/Hardwicke when up in the town square, the town council made sure they were smaller than the Doyle statue that was the heart and focus of our little burg. They were just actors, after all, wonderful but only interpreters of what we really held dear. When we went to the library for some light reading, we knew that Mary Russell, Shadwell Rafferty, Sigmund Freud, Count Dracula and a slew of others were not part of the Canon, but at the new development with its lure of shiny new buildings lit in bright neon people are told there are many canons, some just as good or even better than the original. The Moffat Mall offers Sherlock Burberry Coats, John jumpers, Jim crowns and Molly lab jackets that are now all the rage. Yes, our Sherlockian town will never be the same, but as long as we remember and cherish what made our town unique and special, those 60 stories, our town will survive and thrive.

"On a personal note, I want to say I appreciate this recent run I've had returning to the Peoria comment section. I don't know what mercurial whims run through Culverton Smith's head, but when he commands Staples to let my comments cross his threshold, I do value them."
The irony of a three-day Sherlock convention called "Elementary" being held over in the UK this weekend makes me smile a bit. It also makes me smile for a lot of other reasons. It's a strange new Sherlockian world now, thanks...
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