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Whitestone Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery - Arian Sadeghi, DDS & Dorothy Rose Lorenzo, DMD
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Amazing Reviews from Amazing Patients!!!!
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We love hearing what your experience with us was like... we value our patients and value your thoughts =)
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Don't make the mistake by getting your implants done in a General Dentist setting. Please read the attached article to find out more information on how Implants being done in a General Dentist setting have a low success rate as to getting it done by an Oral Surgeon.
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Dental Implant Surgery:

More and more people are getting dental implants to replace missing teeth. They're a long-term solution that is imbedded in your jawbone, just like your natural teeth. They even go your natural teeth one better, since they can't develop cavities. Plus, unlike fixed bridges or removable dentures, dental implants will not affect neighboring healthy teeth or lead to bone loss in the jaw. If properly cared for, dental implants can last a lifetime.

Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best done by a trained surgeon. Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) has the specialized education and training in the complexities of the bone, skin, muscles and nerves involved, to ensure you get the best possible results. A 2014 study suggests greater implant success rates when performed by a dental specialist.​

http://myoms.org/assets/uploads/documents/Ebook_dental_implant_R.pdf
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Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery:

Tooth Extractions

You may need to have a tooth extracted for a number of reasons such as decay, injury, or as part of orthodontic treatment. Whatever the reason, you will most likely be referred to an oral and facial surgeon who will remove your tooth in the office using an anesthetic that is appropriate for your procedure.

Apicoectomy

While most root canals are successful, there are times when a root canal alone isn’t sufficient. If the infection from the dead nerve inside a tooth spreads beyond the tooth root and into the surrounding bone, your dentist may refer you to an oral and facial surgeon for an apicoectomy. During an apicoectomy, the surgeon removes the infected portion of the tooth’s root in order to clean the infection from the tooth and surrounding bone and then fills the root to prevent future infections.

Exposing Impacted Teeth as Part of Orthodontic Treatment
It is not uncommon for teeth other than wisdom teeth to be impacted, or blocked from entering the mouth. Fortunately, your orthodontist and oral and facial surgeon can bring the impacted tooth through the gum and into the correct position – giving you a beautiful healthy smile.

Frenectomy

Frena are small folds of tissue located in the mouth: under the tongue, inside the upper lip, inside the lower lip, and connecting the cheeks to the gums.

A frenectomy is a simple procedure performed in the oral and facial surgeon’s office to loosen the frenum’s connection and extend the range of motion in that part of the body.

Dental Hemisection and Root Amputation

If, even after a root canal, one or more of the tooth’s roots should become infected or there is significant bone loss around the tooth, your dentist may refer you to an oral and facial surgeon for a hemisection or root amputation. During a hemisection, your surgeon removes one-half of the tooth, leaving a serviceable one-rooted tooth. The term “root amputation” refers to the surgical removal of one root of a multi-rooted tooth. 

Other Soft Tissue Surgeries

Soft tissue grafts

Soft-tissue grafts in the mouth can be important to maintaining oral health. Soft tissue grafts are used to add more tissue in a certain area and may be used to:

-Prevent further gum recession;
-Cover an exposed root;
-Stop sensitivity in the affected area; 
-Improve the look of the tooth; and/or
-Prevent problems in the future.

Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADS)

Temporary anchorage devices (TADS) are occasionally used for a short time during orthodontic treatment. TADS are small titanium screws that orthodontists use to help reposition teeth. TADS are usually placed by the oral and facial surgeon in their office. When the TADS are no longer needed, they are removed and the site is usually fully healed in a couple of days.

Gingivectomy and Gingivoplasty

Gingivitis, an inflammation of the gum tissue surrounding the teeth, is caused by bacteria that, if left unchecked, may lead to periodontitis.  A gingivectomy surgically removes diseased or excess gum tissue and the bacteria that can cause periodontitis. 
Gingivoplasty, which is the surgical reshaping of the gum tissue, is often performed in combination with a gingivectomy for cosmetic or functional purposes.  

Crown Lengthening Procedures

Before placing a crown on a tooth that has been weakened by decay, is cracked or broken, or severely worn down, your dentist may refer you to an oral and facial surgeon for a crown lengthening procedure to ensure that enough of the tooth’s structure is available to securely hold a crown.

http://myoms.org/assets/uploads/documents/Ebook_Dental_and_Soft_Tissue_Surgery.pdf
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Head, Neck and Oral Cancer:

Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) is the expert for diagnosing and surgically treating cancer of the head, neck and mouth.

The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is hard to detect or diagnose, but because the cancer is often discovered late in its development. Your family dentist or OMS is in the best position to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. 

Perform a Self-Exam Monthly

Everyone should perform an oral cancer self-exam each month. An oral examination is performed using a bright light and a mirror:

-Remove any dentures
-Look and feel inside the lips and the front of gums
-Tilt head back to inspect and feel the roof of your mouth
-Pull the cheek out to see its inside surface as well as the back of the gums
-Pull out your tongue and look at all of its surfaces
-Feel for lumps or enlarged lymph nodes (glands) in both sides of the neck including under the lower jaw

When performing a self-examination, look for the following:

-White patches of the oral tissues — leukoplakia
-Red patches — erythroplakia
-Red and white patches — erythroleukoplakia
-A sore that fails to heal and bleeds easily
-An abnormal lump or thickening of the tissues of the mouth
-Chronic sore throat or hoarseness
-Difficulty in chewing or swallowing
-A mass or lump in the neck

Your mouth is one of your body's most important early warning systems. Don't ignore any suspicious lumps or sores. Should you discover something, make an appointment for a prompt examination. Early treatment may well be the key to complete recovery.

http://myoms.org/assets/uploads/documents/Ebook_Head_Neck_Oral_Cancer_R.pdf
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Obstructive Sleep Apnea:

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious and even life-threatening condition. The risks of undiagnosed OSA include heart attack, stroke, irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure, heart disease and decreased libido. In addition, OSA causes daytime drowsiness that can result in accidents, lost productivity and relationship problems. 

The National Sleep Foundation estimates that 18 million adults have obstructive sleep apnea and it is likely that OSA also affects 2% to 3% of children. Yet, people who have OSA may not be aware they have a problem. If someone close to you has spoken of your loud snoring and has noticed that you often wake up abruptly, gasping for air, you should consult your Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon (OMS). 

http://myoms.org/assets/uploads/documents/Ebook_Obstructive_Sleep_Apnea_R.pdf
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Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery:

A cleft palate often requires multiple surgeries. The initial surgery is usually performed by the time a baby is three months old.

Repair of a cleft palate often requires multiple surgeries over the course of 18 years. The first surgery to repair the palate usually occurs when the baby is between six and 12 months old. The initial surgery creates a functional palate, reduces the chances that fluid will develop in the middle ears, and aids in the proper development of the teeth and facial bones.

As a member of a team of healthcare specialists, your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) plays an important role in the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the jaw and facial structures, leading to normal function and appearance. Care and treatment must consider function, appearance, nutrition, speech, hearing, and emotional and psychological development.

Repairing your child's cleft lip or cleft palate is a serious commitment. We urge you to download the ebook on this page for further information.

http://myoms.org/assets/uploads/documents/Ebook_Cleft_Lip_Palate.pdf
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TMJ:

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small joint located in front of the ear where the skull and lower jaw meet. It permits the lower jaw to move and function.

Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) disorders are not uncommon. Individuals with a TMJ disorder may experience a variety of symptoms, such as earaches, headaches and limited ability to open their mouth.

When symptoms of TMJ trouble appear, consult an oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS). A specialist in the areas of the mouth, teeth and jaws, your OMS is in a good position to correctly diagnose the problem. Diagnosing TMJ disorders can be complex and may require different diagnostic procedures. Special imaging studies of the joints may be ordered and appropriate referral to other dental or medical specialists or a physical therapist may be made.

Treatment

Treatment may range from conservative dental and medical care to complex surgery. Depending on the diagnosis, treatment may include short-term non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain and muscle relaxation, bite plate or splint therapy, and even stress management counseling. If non-surgical treatment is unsuccessful or if there is clear joint damage, surgery may be indicated. Surgery can involve either arthroscopy (the method identical to the orthopaedic procedures used to inspect and treat larger joints such as the knee) or repair of damaged tissue by a direct surgical approach.

Once TMJ disorders are correctly diagnosed, your OMS can provide appropriate treatment to relieve the problem.

http://myoms.org/assets/uploads/documents/Ebook_TMJ_R.pdf
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