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J Tang
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J Tang

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There's never been a year even close to 2016 since we've been keeping track. Record warm by far. Embedded image. 9:04 am - 16 Jun 2016. 17 Retweets6 likes. Reply to @EricHolthaus. Home · Sign up · Log in · Search · About. More like this; Less like this; Cancel. Not on Twitter?
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J Tang

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Boss.
 
High-Speed Camera at Florida Tech Captures Amazing Lightning Flashes

Scientists at Florida Institute of Technology used a high-speed camera to capture amazing lighting flashes from a May thunderstorm about six miles from the university’s Melbourne campus.

The flashes were recorded at 7,000 frames per second, and the video was captured using a high-speed camera purchased with a $456,000 grant from the National Science Foundation obtained by Dr. Ningyu Liu, an associate professor in Florida Tech’s Geospace Physics Lab and the principal investigator for the project, and Dr. Hamid Rassoul, dean of Florida Tech’s College of Science and the project’s co-principal investigator. The work also involves graduate students Levi Boggs, Julia Tilles, and Alan Bozarth.

More information here>>
http://newsroom.fit.edu/2016/06/02/high-speed-camera-florida-tech-captures-amazing-lightning-flash/

► Credit: Geospace Physics Laboratory

► Gif via http://gizmodo.com

► Watch the video "Lightning Storm Recorded at 7000 Frames Per Second">> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUIpltFo_fg

Further reading

► SEVERE WEATHER 101: Lightning>>
http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/education/svrwx101/lightning/types/

► Lightning flashes and strokes>> http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/lightning2.html

► Where lightning flashes most>>
http://earthsky.org/earth/where-on-earth-does-lightning-flash-most

#naturalphenomena, #physics, #GeospacePhysics, #tech, #LightningFlashes, #spaceSciences
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"never follow your passion, but always bring it with you."

Because you may suck at your passion!!!
 
So true.
"Follow your passion" is a piece of life advice that's commonly thrown around. It's heard in the photography industry, and especially in graduation commenc
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This is great news!
 
Citizen Maths: free, open mathematical literacy for everyone.
Citizen Maths: free, open mathematical literacy for everyone
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Awesome!!
 
A University College Dublin garden project visualises the evolution of plant life on Earth.
A UCD garden project that represents the evolution of plant life on Earth will go on show at the June festival
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What's up, hotties (as measured in degrees K)!!!
 
This is my new favorite meme.
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Substitute in any country and the hypocrisy is the same throughout. I don't want to be a Leo...How do I make sure I don't become another Leo?
The Indian elite's armchair concern for the country.
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Ali things in moderation, even TED talks!
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Free JPL web series
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Y'all know that China's internet bans the search word "8964", right? Well I guess I've gotta do my part to preserve history as I know it. Thank you +Sean Cowen for the original post!
 
Crackdown at Tiananmen Square Begins on 3 June 1989

This is arguably one of the most famous photographs of the 20th Century, as seen in LIFE Magazine and was one of four similar versions that was taken by Jeff Widener of the Associated Press. The incident, colloquially in China, is known as June Fourth (Chinese: 六四; pinyin: Liù-Sì.) By the way, "Tank Man" has never been identified...

With protests for democratic reforms entering their seventh week, the Chinese government authorizes its soldiers and tanks to reclaim Beijing’s Tiananmen Square at all costs. By nightfall on June 4, Chinese troops had forcibly cleared the square, killing hundreds and arresting thousands of demonstrators and suspected dissidents.

On April 15, the death of Hu Yaobang, a former Communist Party head who supported democratic reforms, roused some 100,000 students to gather at Beijing’s Tiananmen Square to commemorate the leader and voice their discontent with China’s authoritative government. On April 22, an official memorial service for Hu Yaobang was held in Tiananmen’s Great Hall of the People, and student representatives carried a petition to the steps of the Great Hall, demanding to meet with Premier Li Peng. The Chinese government refused the meeting, leading to a general boycott of Chinese universities across the country and widespread calls for democratic reforms.

Ignoring government warnings of suppression of any mass demonstration, students from more than 40 universities began a march to Tiananmen on April 27. The students were joined by workers, intellectuals, and civil servants, and by mid-May more than a million people filled the square, the site of Mao Zedong’s proclamation of the People’s Republic of China in 1949.

On May 20, the government formally declared martial law in Beijing, and troops and tanks were called in to disperse the dissidents. However, large numbers of students and citizens blocked the army’s advance, and by May 23 government forces had pulled back to the outskirts of Beijing. On June 3, with negotiations to end the protests stalled and calls for democratic reforms escalating, the troops received orders from the Chinese government to seize control of Tiananmen Square and the streets of Beijing. Hundreds were killed and thousands arrested.

In the weeks after the government crackdown, an unknown number of dissidents were executed, and hard-liners in the government took firm control of the country. The international community was outraged by the incident, and economic sanctions imposed by the United States and other countries sent China’s economy into decline. By late 1990, however, international trade had resumed, thanks in part to China’s release of several hundred imprisoned dissidents.

Or in other words, business as usual with the Chinese...

#china   #tiananmensquare   #worldhistory   #manvstanks   #history   #democracy   #thisdayinhistory   #tankman  

via/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiananmen_Square_protests_of_1989

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history

1989 Raw Video: Man vs. Chinese tank Tiananmen square
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YeFzeNAHEhU

A CNN crew covering the June 5, 1989, protests in Beijing recorded a man stopping a Chinese tank in Tiananmen Square. Then he climed up on it!
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