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Karim Qaiser
Lives in Karachi
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The singer thanks his fans for making this possible in his unique style, ”My worldwide fans are me real soul as they appreciates, admires, my creative inventive work and its proved the epic success as my written song Eye to Eye debut music video received so many rewards just because of fans true love towards for my work hence the song entire rewards belongs to all fans as its their success always feels great that my fans are my real soul”.
#pakistan   #eyetoeye  
Find out about Taher Shah's latest accolade
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The Sunni Muslim states’ decision at the Arab League summit in Egypt to craft an alliance to confront Shiite Muslim Houthi advances in Yemen is dangerous and risks undesirable American involvement.

As Americans, who have armed Sunni Arab states to the teeth over the years, it might be satisfying to see them accepting responsibility for outbreaks of trouble in their region, in particular the Shiite Houthis, supported to a degree by Iran. The Arab League met in Egypt over the weekend and pledged to put together a force, including air and ground troops, to fight the Houthis in Yemen to the death and put Yemeni President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi back in power. He has fled the country.

However, Americans should also bear in mind two crucial facts about the forces of the Arab states. First, they tend to fight effectively only with U.S. intelligence and logistics support. They have lots of high-tech equipment, most of it bought from the United States, but tend not to do that well unsupported in actual fighting. Bombing will anger but not turn back the Houthis.

Second, the track record of other Arab armies fighting Yemenis in Yemen is poor. The Egyptians were soundly trounced in South Yemen when they put troops there in the 1960s. Border skirmishes between the Saudis and Yemenis have favored the Yemenis.

So, if the other Arabs, led by the Saudis, figure out that bombing the Houthis won’t work and they try a land invasion, either from Saudi Arabia from the north or by sea from the south, they are likely to get cut up. The result will then be, either they implore the United States for more military help, or, worse, and potentially at the same time, the Houthi Yemenis invade Saudi Arabia.

The border is 1,100 miles long and basically indefensible. Saudi Arabia, a backward, thinly populated monarchy, is fragile to say the least. America and its oil companies are deeply involved in it.

The United States should be strongly urging the Arabs, first, to lay off the bombing, and, second, to talk to the Yemeni Houthis and their patron, Iran. The course they are on now is potentially catastrophic for them, and seriously troublesome for America.

#yemen  #saudiarabia
The Sunni Muslim states’ decision at the Arab League summit in Egypt to craft an alliance to confront Shiite Muslim Houthi advances in Yemen is dangerous and risks undesirable American involvement. As Americans, who have armed Sunni Arab states to the teeth over the years, it might be satisfying to see them accepting responsibility for outbreaks of trouble in their region, in particular the Shiite Houthis, supported to a degree by Iran. The Arab ...
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Am not an expert in war but as a layman from Kenya, the solution is both dialogue and political, guns n' bombs don't bring solutions but they result in extremism and cycle of violence, may God in heaven help us.
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There is an adage in economics known as ‘the lump of labor fallacy’. It is that technological change is destroying jobs and generating rising unemployment. It rests on an image of a finite number of jobs. In 1809, the Luddites destroyed machines seen to be putting them out of work. Ever since, their action has been cited as disproving the unemployment effects of technological progress.

To be fair to the Luddites, their actions should rather be interpreted as a protest against the destruction of a way of life that had generated social stability and community respect for traditional forms of workmanship.

Today, we have something similar. Technological innovation is more rapid and broad-based than in any previous industrial revolution, much of it linked to Silicon Valley and the entrepreneurial dynamism of its denizens.

Jobs are indeed being destroyed. The jeremiahs are out in force. “The end of work,” they shout. “Jobless growth!”

This is nonsense. What is happening is more subtle and potentially liberating, but also potentially generating a dystopia of socially unsustainable inequality, in which a growing share of the population will be mired in chronic insecurity, through no fault of their own.

This is not a time for smug libertarian mantras about meritocracy and the bracing effects of competitiveness. If what is happening is allowed to continue without imaginative new social policies, our society will be blighted by millions of people living wretchedly insecure lives and reacting accordingly.

Globalisation, technological change, and government policies have produced a class structure with a tiny plutocracy of billionaires coexisting with a dwindling salariat, with employment security, pensions and paid vacations, and a rapidly growing precariat, living bits-and-pieces lives, without occupational careers and experiencing declining real wages. Telling the precariat that they must obtain more schooling and training is disingenuous. Millions are currently over-qualified for the labor and work they can expect to be doing
There is an adage in economics known as ‘the lump of labor fallacy’. It is that technological change is destroying jobs and generating rising
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Australia are world champions once again 
This should have gone to New Zealand. They've never won a world cup :(
In cricket and in life, the golden rule is to be the best on the day it matters the most and Australia did just that.
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Karim Qaiser

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The butterfly is one of nature's most graceful creations, but with upgrades from Festo, this robotic doppleganger is better equipped to navigate large spaces. It might flap and flutter like the real thing, but this butterfly is 100 percent artificial--although the branding on the wings probably gave that away.
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#yemen   #israel   #saudiarabia   #iran  

Funny how the article doesn't mention ISIS at all. Why was there no Sunni Arab alliance against ISIS or al Qaida?
The new Saudi leadership role in the region could provide a counter-force to Iran absent a US force doing so.
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+Remo Gutierrez I'm doing well Remo :)
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Karim Qaiser

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#Houthi rebels defy #Saudi air raids to advance on Aden

Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels pushed hard into the southern city of Aden. The move showed that the Shia group had no plans to back down in the face of air strikes by a coalition of Sunni states led by Saudi Arabia.

Fierce fighting rocked the port city as Houthi forces pounded it with artillery, according to residents. Al Jazeera, the pan-Arab news broadcaster, reported that up to 60 people had been killed in Aden.

Mohammad al-Bukhaiti, a council member of the Houthi militia Ansar Allah, said his forces were braced for a Saudi-led regional intervention, though observers believe such a move is not imminent.
It is becoming clear that a ground invasion will probably be required if the coalition wants to achieve its military aims in the Arab world’s poorest country.

The Arab League voted this weekend to create a “joint force” for Yemen, a plan unlikely ever to materialise but which gives Riyadh regional legitimacy to lead a campaign with its allies.

Mr Bukhaiti said: “The goals of this intervention will not succeed.”
Yemen is being dragged into a regional proxy war between Iran, a Shia Muslim country, and Sunni Arab Saudi Arabia. Yemen has for years been fighting an al-Qaeda insurgency and a southern separatist movement.

However, the air strikes, which continued on Monday, appear to have failed to curb Houthi rebels and their allies.

Ibrahim Sharqieh, deputy director of the Brookings Doha Centre think-tank, said Saudi Arabia was unlikely to launch a ground campaign until it had degraded Houthi forces or was able to organise Yemeni forces to work with it on the ground.

“I do not expect to see [a ground intervention] for another two to three weeks, maybe a month,” Mr Sharqieh said. “The Houthis are still in a strong position. The forces loyal to [former president Ali Abdullah] Saleh are still very strong. In these circumstances we are unlikely to see ground operations.”

One of the Saudi coalition air strikes hit a UN-run camp for displaced people in the northern city of Haradh, wounding and killing dozens of people. Johannes van der Klaauw, a representative of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in the capital Sana’a, said at least 30 people were killed and 25 others wounded.

“We are outraged by this attack,” Mr van der Klaauw said. “Whoever committed this attack did not respect humanitarian law.”


Gulf air strikes also battered Aden’s airport, which doubles as an air force base. But Houthi rebels and allied forces continued to push into the southern provinces surrounding Aden, as forces loyal to ousted president Abd-Rabbu Hadi appeared to unravel.

Mr Hadi’s “popular committees” largely returned to their home provinces and left the fighting in Aden to secessionist militias and armed locals, said a person close to the southern separatist movement.

Forces loyal to Mr Saleh, forced out in a 2011 transition deal, were also on Aden’s outskirts as part of the Houthi advance. Mr Saleh, who once fought a war with the Houthis, has joined forces with them in an attempt to remove Mr Hadi from power. He still wields influence over tens of thousands of soldiers.
One Aden resident, who asked not to be named for her safety, said Houthi forces would struggle to hold the city as the fighting became increasingly bloody.

“They [Houthis and Saleh supporters] are attempting to make ground but getting killed . . . Saleh’s men have been shooting with tanks in a reckless way. They are shooting so much that I believe they are hitting homes.”
Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels pushed hard into the southern city of Aden. The move showed that the Shia group had no plans to back down in the face of air strikes by a coalition of Sunni states led by Saudi Arabia. Fierce fighting rocked the
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Karim Qaiser

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War on the Rocks is expanding, and we need your help! Please support us on Indiegogo! The Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) –...
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Karim Qaiser

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It is good that many millions of farmers in India have ownership in the production of food... imagine if farming too was done by the big companies, such as the ones which produce cigarettes and alcohol, then there would be no farmers at all, poor or otherwise.

If you have the ability to do so, you should apply your intelligence and vet messages before resharing... I am just not able to understand how a person such as yourself, who is competent enough to use the web and the social net, ends up forwarding stupid messages such as this one. 
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This comment just hit it out of the park; "Seven monarchies and a military dictatorship are bombing Yemen, threatening ground invasion, to protect its democracy."

#Yemen   #SaudiArabia  
Saudi government is using public statements and media leaks to put pressure on Pakistan.
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democracy? Election has only 1 choice and the civil war is between  between two corrupt idiots:   Saleh and Hadi. Now Hadi is calling on foreign powers to keep bombing Yemen until his opposition is defeated.

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2015/03/whats-really-going-yemen.html
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Karim Qaiser

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Im guilty
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I flip the channel and lay remote down. My hands are than stuck on the keyboard!.. There are FIVE types of internet addiction. 
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