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Karim Qaiser
Lives in Karachi
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Karim Qaiser

Music d(-_-)b  - 
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The game tron 2.0 was better. 
The OST of tron legacy is good but it lacks the original movie spirit. 
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Pakistan needs more power. What it doesn't need is having Karachi (a city which houses a tenth of the Pakistan's population, and equal to 1/3rd of the whole population of the UK) fall under an exclusion zone. Considering more than 55% of Pakistan's taxes come from Karachi, any nuclear disaster on a scale which leaves a large part of the city uninhabitable could result in the country going kaput. Besides, I live here :|
ACP-1000 reacto­rs will stand less than 20 miles from Karach­i's densel­y popula­ted metrop­olis of 20 millio­n reside­nts
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I wish the world would start to go far away from nuclear reactors, you do know what happened in Japan after the tsunami disaster? They didn't know how to contain the reactors and it has now leaked into the ocean.
What will be the result of this? I guess we will find out but many people live off the sea life for food and income, not good in my mind. Ok about some alternatives that are safe for humans. We have a unlimited free source of solar energy we can harvest from the sun. We can use dames and do this already, we could also use wind mills more as that is another free source of energy and I forgot the name of it but we are using the breakdown of human waste and trash for energy also.
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Tears in rain
 
I spoke with my friend about saddest moments in films. Of course Lion King came up .. but for me ... Tears in Rain
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War monger and a liar Bibi needs a lesson in history as well as reality!
.....“If we wanted to annihilate Jews, we have a large number of Jewish population in Iran who not only live in the country in peace, but, in fact, have a representative in Iranian parliament allocated to them, disproportionately to their number,” Zarif said.
Iranian Foreign Minister Zarif tells NBC his country `doesn’t support blind terrorism’ and `we will never have a bomb.’
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Karim Qaiser

Astronomy  - 
 
Discovered: Black Hole 12 Billion Times The Size Of The Sun

AsianScientist (Mar. 2, 2015) - Scientists have discovered the brightest quasar in the early universe, powered by the most massive black hole yet known at that time. The international team led by astronomers from Peking University in China and from the University of Arizona (UA) announce their findings in the scientific journal Nature.

The discovery of this quasar, named SDSS J0100+2802, marks an important step in understanding how quasars have evolved from the earliest epoch 900 million years after the Big Bang, thought to have happened 13.7 billion years ago. The quasar, with its central black hole mass of 12 billion solar masses and the luminosity of 420 trillion suns, is at a distance of 12.8 billion light-years from Earth.

The discovery of this ultraluminous quasar also presents a major puzzle to the theory of black hole growth at early universe, according to Fan Xiaohui, Regents' Professor of Astronomy at the UA's Steward Observatory, who co-authored the study.

"How can a quasar so luminous, and a black hole so massive, form so early in the history of the universe, at an era soon after the earliest stars and galaxies have just emerged?" Fan said. "And what is the relationship between this monster black hole and its surrounding environment, including its host galaxy?" 

"This ultraluminous quasar with its supermassive black hole provides a unique laboratory to the study of the mass assembly and galaxy formation around the most massive black holes in the early universe." 

The quasar dates from a time close to the end of an important cosmic event that astronomers referred to as the "epoch of reionization”: the cosmic dawn when light from the earliest generations of galaxies and quasars is thought to have ended the "cosmic dark ages" and transformed the universe into how we see it today. 

Discovered in 1963, quasars are the most powerful objects beyond our Milky Way galaxy, beaming vast amounts of energy across space as the supermassive black hole in their center sucks in matter from its surroundings. Thanks to the new generation of digital sky surveys, astronomers have discovered more than 200,000 quasars, with ages ranging from 0.7 billion years after the Big Bang to today. 

Shining with the equivalent of 420 trillion suns, the new quasar is seven times brighter than the most distant quasar known which is 13 billion years away. It harbors a black hole with mass of 12 billion solar masses, proving it to be the most luminous quasar with the most massive black hole among all the known high redshift (very distant) quasars. 

"By comparison, our own Milky Way galaxy has a black hole with a mass of only four million solar masses at its center; the black hole that powers this new quasar is 3,000 timea heavier," Fan said.

The study's lead author, Wang Feige, a doctoral student from Peking University who is supervised jointly by Fan and Professor Wu Xue-Bing at Peking University, initially spotted this quasar for further study.

"This quasar was first discovered by our 2.4-meter Lijiang Telescope in Yunnan, China, making it the only quasar ever discovered by a two-meter telescope at such distance, and we're very proud of it," Wang said. "The ultraluminous nature of this quasar will allow us to make unprecedented measurements of the temperature, ionization state and metal content of the intergalactic medium at the epoch of reionization."

Following the initial discovery, two telescopes in southern Arizona did the heavy lifting in determining the distance and mass of the black hole: the 8.4-meter Large Binocular Telescope, or LBT, on Mount Graham and the 6.5-meter Multiple Mirror Telescope, or MMT, on Mount Hopkins. Additional observations with the 6.5-meter Magellan Telescope in Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and the 8.2-meter Gemini North Telescope in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, confirmed the results. 

To further unveil the nature of this remarkable quasar and to shed light on the physical processes that led to the formation of the earliest supermassive black holes, the research team will carry out further investigations on this quasar with more international telescopes, including the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Telescope. 
The massive black hole powers a quasar 420 trillion times brighter than the Sun.
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And we all thank evolution for not putting any dangerous quazars near us.
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Karim Qaiser

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So wonderful. I'm still totally betting that those methane plumes are vestigial subarean methanogens doing their funky thing. It would be lovely to find evidence of multicellular life on Mars - and I guess so much depends on how long that ocean persisted. 1.5 billion years is a very respectable chunk of time - way longer than the Cambrian explosion is old, and almost as long as multicellular life has existed on Earth - and plenty of time for single-celled life to emerge and maybe even more complex forms. I'd love to know if there was even an oxygenation. :)

So much more to be revealed. :)
A huge primitive ocean covered one-fifth of the red planet’s surface, making it warm, wet and ideal for alien life to gain a foothold, scientists say
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The government does not actually know how many people in Pakistan pay their taxes, but it estimates that the number of taxpayers is anywhere between 770,000 and 1.4 million. Of the 200 million people in Pakistan, only about 4.5 million make more than the Rs400,000 per year minimum that would render them eligible to pay income taxes. The system is so bad that the FBR is actually under instructions not to question even blatantly falsified tax returns if they include a payment because the government is so desperate for revenue that it does not want to discourage even gross underpayments.

So how do we fix a system so badly broken? I could give you some theoretical examples of how things could be improved, but here is the harsh reality: we will not fix this system unless we are absolutely forced to fix it, until we are left with no choice but to confront this monumental challenge. And the only way that will happen is if the United States stops giving us money, both directly and through multilateral agencies. Only when the financial pain gets unbearably bad — when Islamabad starts to resemble Tehran — will we wake up and fix this gigantic mess nearly seven decades in the making. Could we come to our senses before that point? Yes, but I highly doubt it.
Only when the financ­ial pain gets unbear­ably bad — when Islama­bad starts to resemb­le Tehran — will we wake up
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You need to start taxing agricultural income, but the feudal landlords control the state so agricultural income is not taxed at all
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Maybe they'll blame this on Putin too
 
A letter from a New England pilot has prompted the National Transportation Safety Board to consider reopening... http://trib.al/sBkpfwQ
A letter from a New England pilot has prompted the National Transportation Safety Board to consider reopening the investigation of a plane crash that killed musicians Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J.P. 'The Big Bopper' Richardson in 1959.
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"The AFL-CIO’s Lane Kirkland once suggested, half-heartedly, that things would be easier if Congress repealed all labor laws, and let labor and management go at it 'mano a mano.' It’s time to take this proposal seriously. So here it is – a free market proposal to employers:

"We give you the repeal of Wagner, of the anti-yellow dog provisions of Norris-LaGuardia, of legal protections against punitive firing of union or- ganizers, and of all the workplace safety, overtime, and fair practices legislation. You give us the repeal of Taft-Hartley, of the Railway Labor Relations Act and its counterparts in other industries, of all state right-to-work laws, and of SLAPP lawsuits. All we’ll leave in place, out of the whole labor law regime, is the provisions of Norris-LaGuardia taking intrusion by federal troops and court injunctions out of the equation.

"And we’ll mop the floor with your asses."

~ Kevin Carson
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Have him in circles
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