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Colin Wee (Traditional Tae Kwon Do)
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I know I made a mistake calling it a tension press. That's how we perform it, but it's more popularly known as a 'hook block' by Taekwondo practitioners.

Anyway, we are looking at that open palm extension and side kick, then using this as a takedown. This was early days of this application, and I did show the takedown from the inside and the outside of the leg ... but the video only presents it from the outside.
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This is about using the double augmented block and then allowing the front hand to deal with a secondary tool from either left or right. The video does not show the full extent of the lesson but does show enough to allow you to appreciate the gross motor skills.
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This is the opening sequence of dosan applied against a mid height centreline punch in order to work both hands to brush and deflect the oncoming punch, trap it using the forearm and elbow, and then counter strike using a very subversive centreline punch of your own.
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We were working on a technique sequence from Bassai that starts with a Yamatsuki or mountain strike, turn into a scoop block - and using it as a limb destruction followed by a takedown. To either arm. Then Josh asks me what happens if the technique fails, this started a discussion regarding continuing or flowing from a failed technique, and still responding to the opponent. These follow up solutions I've drawn from our Tekki/Chulgi applications but the gist of the discussion is about using what works for us and returning to what we are comfortable with. This approach does not reflect material only from that form or from those form sequences immediately before or after the initial technique. But it surely celebrates the form because it's making that tactical skill work for our group.
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This is from a recent 'SuperLight(TM)' sparring session.

SuperLight sparring is a great opportunity to bring it all together. You can practice technique, you can work with distancing and timing, and you can do it safely with a partner who is still providing you with a good challenge.

SuperLight gets better when you do have a goal in mind and you are testing out specific techniques against a live opponent. This is not shown in this session, but after Josh and Colin had their fun, we had a more 'structured' SuperLight session with Niaal and Josh to prompt them to include or consider tactical skills the weren't using in earlier sessions. This raised the bar and made it a very good learning opportunity for both these black belts.
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I see loads of sparring exchanges where it's all kicks and punches, and lots of boxing skills. Or kickboxing skills. Yet, there are many tactics within the patterns that cater towards exchanges and yet do not look like they were pulled out of a boxing ring.

This particular sequence from Gaebaek or from Chulgi can be applied as a close quarter set that ties up the opponent, or can be used against a flurry of strikes coming your way.
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This drill as shown in this video is from Bassai. It is a simple application of the opening sequence of the pattern to develop tactical close quarter hand skills. We chose it to honour and celebrate Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee's memory.
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We were practising the double pressing blocks from Kwanggae as close quarter tactics. And we just happened to encounter an arm control which featured a fairly 'strange' takedown sequence - using more soft style skills to drop the opponent. The down up and down however looked so much like the sine wave I thought I would get this recorded for my friend Soo Shin Kwan - who has posited that the sine wave motion is excellent for throws and takedowns. So this is for his entertainment.
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This is a wedging block technique from Dosan used as a gap closing tactic - dealing with lead hand or secondary tool strikes. The more an application is able to handle such common strikes, the less adaptation is required from the practitioner, and the easier it is to apply skill in order to counter the opponent.
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