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Carlos Batara
Immigration Attorney, Blogger, Educator, Public Speaker, Community Organizer, And Non-Profit Consultant.
Immigration Attorney, Blogger, Educator, Public Speaker, Community Organizer, And Non-Profit Consultant.
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With all the negative news surrounding possible immigration policies under the Trump Administration, it is likely that fraud con artists will arise to dupe unsuspecting immigrants.  Thus, I have put together this Infographic on the most common schemes used by scammers. You can download directly a copy by clicking here >>> http://www.carlosbatara.com/services/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/5-Common-Immigration-Scams-Infographic.pdf     
 

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For a country that once boasted the '100,000 welcomes' to visitors, Ireland has become the least welcoming country in western Europe for refugees.

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President-elect Trump may want to quickly deport millions of immigrants. The reality, however, is not quite that simple.
 
Currently, immigration courts are struggling with a case backlog at an all-time high of 521,676. With only 300 judges, this creates a caseload of over 1,730 per judge. That's not including the refugees and migrants arriving at American ports of entry on a daily basis.
 
While it remains unclear what Trump will or won’t do, there is no doubt that his announced plans - to apprehend, detain, and deport three million immigrants - would not work in the already drowning immigration court system.

http://www.scoop.it/t/immigration-court-and-deportation-defense/p/4071847719/2016/11/20/how-the-immigration-court-would-crash-under-donald-trump-s-plan?utm_medium=social&utm_source=googleplus
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Over the past week, I've been frequently asked what do I think will happen with immigration under a Trump administration.
 
The Forbes article here is one perspective.
 
On a personal level, I think folks who have benefitted from temporary measures like DACA, Stateside I-601 Waiver Applications, Prosecutorial Discretion at Immigration Court [including Administrative Closure] could be in a rough ride.
 
Even TPS beneficiaries may face the same problem.
 
The Trump term has the potential to be the nightmare I have feared with all temporary programs implemented by the Obama Administration.
 
Consider this: if you applied for DACA, what does the government know about your family? Most likely your parents and some of your siblings are also here without legal permission. In short, as I have warned, there is a long-term danger when you file these applications. By coming out of the shadow, the government has gained a fair amount of insight about other members of your family. 
 
They could now also be in the direct line of fire.
 
You have come out of the shadow and you may ha
http://www.scoop.it/t/riverside-immigration-attorney-news/p/4071731786/2016/11/16/what-will-donald-trump-mean-for-immigration?utm_medium=social&utm_source=googleplus
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Oddly, when I go to USCIS interviews with my clients, I notice that the majority of folks there for their interviews do not appear ready for their big moment.
 
They hardly dress up.  In my view, they should dress as if they are going to a job interview, or a special event with a special person in their lives.
 
I see a lot of individuals with no files, no materials, no documents.
 
Anyway, these reflections led me to create this video about six practical, common sense tips for anyone going to a permanent residence interview with immigration officers.
http://www.scoop.it/t/san-bernardino-immigration-attorney-news/p/4071729616/2016/11/16/six-success-tips-for-your-marriage-based-green-card-interview?utm_medium=social&utm_source=googleplus
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The concept of anchor babies is either deliberate, designed to alarm the public against immigrants, or ignorant.  To the extent such information is ignorant is based on the reality of filing a family-based immigrant petition for a parent who entered the U.S. without permission.
 
First, the child must be 21 years old.
 
Second, once the child files for the parent, the process will take 2-3 years to complete.
 
Third, the illegal entrant has to return to their home country for the permanent residency interview.  As a result, under existing law, the immigrant parent could be barred from ever returning to the United States.  In many cases, the immigrant is barred for at least 10 years.
 
In sum, that means the process will take 21 + 2 + 10 years to complete.  That’s 33 years, at minimum.
 
So what happens if the parent doesn’t remain in the United States after the child’s birth?
 
Well, then, we’re not talking about anchor babies, are we?
http://www.scoop.it/t/immigration-grassroots-curation/p/4071732534/2016/11/16/birthright-citizenship-and-the-anchor-babies-myth?utm_medium=social&utm_source=googleplus
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